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yek

Moderator
Moderator
The delay types are great, much easier to dial in delays now.

Be careful when selecting the "tape" and "ambient" types, these use a lot more CPU cycles than the other types.
 
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dbarrow

Member
When did you order your Axe-Fx II? I sent in the email to "add to list" on June 21st and have not received a response yet.
 

steverosburg

Experienced
Yek,

Doesn't look like it's quite finished yet--there's still 5 more cells in the top row you could fill before the Send... :lol
 

gittarzann

Power User
How does the return work with the shunt attached to the input?

There is no input other than the send I assume?
 

yek

Moderator
Moderator
How does the return work with the shunt attached to the input?

There is no input other than the send I assume?
That's correct.

Often there is confusion about Send/Return versus FXL. Send and Return can be placed in the last and first column. The cables to Input and Output connection have no consequences, depending on the param settings (see below).

Send has new params. You can now adjust the signal sent to Return (Send Level) as well as the signal that passes through Send to the following block (Output Level). In my layout Output Level is all the way down because I only want to feed Return.

In the Return block the Mix param. is set to 100%, because only the Send signal should be processed.
 

yek

Moderator
Moderator
- Testing the headphones : check. Fine sound through my Sony MDR 7506 phones.

- Running through advanced amp params : check. Seriously,I don't think I'll touch anything other than Low Cut (occasionally).
I saw Cliff post that Speaker Resonance was still around, but the parameter is not in the list.

- TBH, the myriad of input/gain parameters is a bit confusing. Apart from the familiar Input Level (I/O) and amp Drive (like on the G1), there also are now:

-- Amp Gain (Global):
This control provides +/- 12 dB of relative gain for all amp blocks and can be used to adjust the gain of all presets to compensate for the differences in output between guitars (manual)
and
-- Input Trim (amp block):
Allows you to adjust the relative gain of the preamp. Increasing the value will cause the amp to have more gain than designed and vice versa. It is simply a linear gain applied at the input to the block. You can use it to give a typically clean amp a bit more oomph or decrease the gain of a very high-gain amp. Note that this is different than the Drive control because the Drive control interacts with the surrounding circuitry and changes the frequency response as it is varied (manual).

And Input Impedance (Layout) but that's something else that I'll probably always leave on auto.
 
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javajunkie

Moderator
Moderator
- Testing the headphones : check. Fine sound through my Sony MDR 7506 phones.

- Running through advanced amp params : check. Seriously,I don't think I'll touch anything other than Low Cut (occasionally).
I saw Cliff post that Speaker Resonance was still around, but the parameter is not in the list.

- TBH, the myriad of input/gain parameters is a bit confusing. Apart from the familiar Input Level (I/O) and amp Drive (like on the G1), there also are now:

-- Amp Gain (Global):
This control provides +/- 12 dB of relative gain for all amp blocks and can be used to adjust the gain of all presets to compensate for the differences in output between guitars (manual)
and
-- Input Trim (amp block):
Allows you to adjust the relative gain of the preamp. Increasing the value will cause the amp to have more gain than designed and vice versa. It is simply a linear gain applied at the input to the block. You can use it to give a typically clean amp a bit more oomph or decrease the gain of a very high-gain amp. Note that this is different than the Drive control because the Drive control interacts with the surrounding circuitry and changes the frequency response as it is varied (manual).

And Input Impedance (Layout) but that's something else that I'll probably always leave on auto.

Input trim and amp gain global are the same. Input trim is per preset. Global amp gain is global. Input trim is modifiable.

Input impedance is used to give your guitar the same same load as some pedals (like fuzzes and vibes) give. Usually best as you state to keep on auto.

Speaker Resonance has been broken out to Low and High Freq Res
 
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yek

Moderator
Moderator
Input trim and amp gain global are the same. Input trim is per preset. Global amp gain is global. Input trim is modifiable.

Speaker Resonance has been broken out to Low and High Freq Res
Ah, that clears things really up, thanks.
Will add this to wiki.
 

javajunkie

Moderator
Moderator
Ah, that clears things really up, thanks.
Will add this to wiki.
The global Amp Gain is for people who use different guitars and want the input gain to be the same even though the guitars have different outputs. The unity gain feature in the II doesn't allow for this. It makes sure the signal your guitar puts out is what the input to the grid sees while still making sure the A/D converters get a good signal.
 

yek

Moderator
Moderator
Okay, Boost/Pad in I/O is also new.

Manual:
"OUTPUT 1 BOOST/PAD (0-18 dB)
Firstly, this is NOT a boost intended for use during musical performance, as you might find on an amp or pedal. Rather, this parameter is designed to boost signals to the OUT1 D/A converters so they can operate as close to full-scale as possible, while simultaneously padding converter outputs to lower the noise floor. To set this control, increase the boost/pad amount until hard playing on a loud preset causes the front panel OUT1 CLIP LED to light. Then reduce the Boost/Pad setting a few dBs to prevent further clipping. Note that the BOOST amount is also applied to outgoing DIGITAL or USB signals.
"

I'm a bit confused about configuring this. I guess this is only neccesary when all user presets are set way below clipping level? And doesn't this impact headroom?
 

hammeron56

Inspired
Okay, Boost/Pad in I/O is also new.

Manual:
"OUTPUT 1 BOOST/PAD (0-18 dB)
Firstly, this is NOT a boost intended for use during musical performance, as you might find on an amp or pedal. Rather, this parameter is designed to boost signals to the OUT1 D/A converters so they can operate as close to full-scale as possible, while simultaneously padding converter outputs to lower the noise floor. To set this control, increase the boost/pad amount until hard playing on a loud preset causes the front panel OUT1 CLIP LED to light. Then reduce the Boost/Pad setting a few dBs to prevent further clipping. Note that the BOOST amount is also applied to outgoing DIGITAL or USB signals.
"

I'm a bit confused about configuring this. I guess this is only neccesary when all user presets are set way below clipping level? And doesn't this impact headroom?
I use this to increase the signal level to my DAW when recording over USB.
 
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