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Help the Fight Against COVID-19

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jon

Fractal Fanatic
This is great evidence to show what I've been telling people here all the time - it's not 'airborne' like say measles or something but it's spread via air - a cough or sneeze will have particles lingering for roughly 3-4 hrs. Just normal breathing is likely to exhale moisture containing the virus, coughing or sneezing will contain much larger droplets with more virii concentration, allowing a faster spread or more likely infection.

I work in the iron and steel industry. Particles of visible steel or iron dust have an obviously much greater weight than that of an invisible virus just about 125nm wide

Just stirring up some dust leaves the particles in the air for quite some time. Transfer points and anywhere the dust can be disturbed leaves the dust in the air for sometimes hours if the air is still.

Make your own conclusions
 

Donnie B.

Experienced
Report on possible aerosol spread at a choir practice.
There's a lot of confusion about this.
  • aerosol is the propellant. In the case of the virus your lungs exploding air out of your nose or mouth
  • the mucous that gets expelled is what carries the germs
While the spray is in the air it's transmissible. When it falls to a surface that surface is now contaminated.
From my understanding, the longer the surface stays moist the easier the virus can be transmitted.

Covid-19 is not airborne. As soon as the mucous falls, the germs fall along with it.
If it was airborne, it would tell your snot to take a hike and then fly around on its own for a while.

Measles germs can be in the air for upwards of 3 hours after a sneeze! :oops:

EDIT: @jon beat me to it!

EDIT2: Chris Cuomo now has it.
 
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creativespiral

Inspired
We're gonna see a sudden spike as soon as the 64,000 pending tests in the California bottleneck are analyzed in the lab... there's probably other states with the same sort of situation too. Also, testing capacity continues to ramp up across the USA. Again, I'll say, Total Cases data provides very poor data quality if analyzing the slope to glean information.

The data set that doesn't lie as much is the critical/serious cases or deaths. I've sent multiple messages to the admins at the WorldOMeters.info site to add the critical/serious chart to their individual country pages... they currently have worldwide critical/serious chart, and they are collecting data on a country by country basis for critical/serious, but for some inexplicable reason, they are not exposing the critical/serious country data in charts... it is so frustrating to me!!.. it's the most valuable data set to evaluate the virus trajectory and how our actions are effecting it.

If anyone else feels up to it, please go to the WorldOMeters.info site, and click contact at the bottom, and request that "Serious/Critical" data and charts be added to their individual country by country pages. They're collecting the data, they're just not exposing it currently on a country-by-country basis.

https://www.worldometers.info/contact/

I'm considering using the web.archive.org site to do it manually, but will be several hours of tedious data entry work.

Here's the worldwide serious/critical curve as of today:

covid19-serious-critical-cases-2020-03-31.jpg
 

AlbertA

Fractal Fanatic
Here's some great simulations that give you a sense of why combining social distancing, limiting the amount of visits to a central location (like super market, etc) and why testing is really important.

Once you can get the numbers down enough, you should use that opportunity to test and contact trace to isolate cases (what should have been done since the beginning) so there's limited spread.

 

Dr. Dipwad

Experienced
Amazing that so many people still need to be convinced when it was already
proven back in 1918 that social distancing works.
Well, to be fair,
I'm sure that all the people who were alive in 1918 to witness that lesson firsthand,
and old enough to grasp its significance,
and who are still with us today,
with that memory still vivid,
are completely convinced.

;)
 
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toneseeker911

Inspired
There's a lot of confusion about this.
  • aerosol is the propellant. In the case of the virus your lungs exploding air out of your nose or mouth
  • the mucous that gets expelled is what carries the germs
While the spray is in the air it's transmissible. When it falls to a surface that surface is now contaminated.
From my understanding, the longer the surface stays moist the easier the virus can be transmitted.

Covid-19 is not airborne. As soon as the mucous falls, the germs fall along with it.
If it was airborne, it would tell your snot to take a hike and then fly around on its own for a while.

Measles germs can be in the air for upwards of 3 hours after a sneeze! :oops:

EDIT: @jon beat me to it!

EDIT2: Chris Cuomo now has it.
I wouldn’t be so sure if that. They are still studying it and tomorrow they could tell you, oops, looks like it stays in the air for a bit, maybe not like the measles but still something to watch out for.
Those people in choir practice were not showing any symptoms, not coughing and getting saliva and mucus everywhere. Additionally, they were trying to maintain distance between themselves. I don’t think they fully understand how that spread happened.
 

Donnie B.

Experienced
They are still studying it and tomorrow they could tell you, oops, looks like it stays in the air for a bit.
If there was even a 1% chance that the virus was airborne (able to fly fully on its own) you would not see daily WH briefings.
Let alone with both the #1 and #2 guys in the same room.

Those people in choir practice were not showing any symptoms, not coughing and getting saliva and mucus everywhere. Additionally, they were trying to maintain distance between themselves. I don’t think they fully understand how that spread happened.
#1 Everyone involved in that choir practice fiasco was dumb in the first place for even attending.
#2 Washing your hands before entering and staying 6 feet apart doesn't guarantee anything.
#3 They were all SINGING! Talking while 6 feet apart is bad enough if someone is infected.
 
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BaronVonGrim

Experienced
Would be a good idea if they created Covid19 superteam. If your in the medical community, been exposed to the virus and wont get it again?, could follow the epicenter.
 

jon

Fractal Fanatic
Well, that should have been an obvious (albeit small) upside to all this... with all the social distancing, the flu is going to be less impactful right now. huh.
Yeah, this is something I've been hoping will happen as well - all the social distancing could likely mean a VERY significant reduction in all seasonal illness, or easily communicable ones and that makes me happy :)
 

Donnie B.

Experienced
Yeah, this is something I've been hoping will happen as well - all the social distancing could likely mean a VERY significant reduction in all seasonal illness, or easily communicable ones and that makes me happy :)

My wife and I were just talking about this. Self-distancing is going to become the norm
for many. Especially us older folk.
 

BaronVonGrim

Experienced
My wife and I were just talking about this. Self-distancing is going to become the norm
for many. Especially us older folk.
I been social distancing my whole life.
Like the child of a famous person.
My favorite show growing up was Grizzly Adams.
In this new world... I am already strong.
I'm a social distancing kind of musician.
I'm not a musical exhibitionist, or sharer.
 
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