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Speaker Drive vs Motor Drive...

Wolfenstein98k

Power User
Two quick questions here.

1) Why is Speaker Drive in the Amp parameters, while Motor Drive is in the Cab parameters?
Both pertain to speaker modeling as far as I can see - "speaker overdrive" for Speaker Drive, and "effect of high power levels on the tone of the speaker" for Motor Drive.

2) What's the real difference between the two?
The Wiki suggests that Motor Drive = driver compression rather than EQ, but it also suggests that Speaker Drive = overdrive of a speaker, which I can only imagine is more compression than EQ anyway.
 

edo

Power User
I might be completely wrong, but the way I think of it is: speaker drive = the mileage of the speaker (in other words from new at 0 to almost blown at 10), motor drive = the natural compression of a guitar speaker - although up to 7.1 I always felt it sounded more like a maximizer than natural compression, so I never really cared for it too much.
Looking forward to try the new algo later today!
 

Wolfenstein98k

Power User
I don't follow... Speaker Drive is unrelated to Speaker Resonance though. The reasoning for Motor Drive being in the Cab block should still apply to Speaker Drive - and further, it being in the Amp block means that we can't use a real cab & FRFR and have it only apply to the latter, in a live scenario. That's a major benefit of putting Motor Drive in the Cab block.

Unless I'm missing something guys, everyone's given good reason why the Motor Drive is in the Cab block but no reason why Speaker Drive isn't also?

[EDIT: the difference is described in as much detail as we'll get, in the post above this]
 
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FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
So what I've done for the final release is put Motor Drive in BOTH the Amp block and the Cab block. If you're strictly FRFR then you can use the Amp block. If you are using a conventional guitar cab or a hybrid configuration (convention cab for monitoring and direct to FOH) then you can use the Cab block.

Doing it in the Amp block also has the advantage that the speaker resonance information in the Amp block is used to calculate the frequency dependent heating whereas the Cab block uses a fixed set of data that is representative of a typical speaker.

Finally I've made the time constant adjustable. I did some more calculations and measurements and found that a typical guitar speaker is actually lower than what I had previously calculated because thinner wire is used than I was assuming. Regardless you can now set the thermal time constant to get whatever response rate feels best.
 

solo-act

Fractal Fanatic
Brilliant +1
Cliff - the new optical + motor drive is a game-changer for performing with backing tracks, which also makes it much more plug/play in the studio. I've hunted the dynamics I have now for 19 years. I'm actually having a hard time accepting it's as good as it is. Thanks a million!
 
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NeoSound

Fractal Fanatic
So what I've done for the final release is put Motor Drive in BOTH the Amp block and the Cab block. If you're strictly FRFR then you can use the Amp block. If you are using a conventional guitar cab or a hybrid configuration (convention cab for monitoring and direct to FOH) then you can use the Cab block.

Doing it in the Amp block also has the advantage that the speaker resonance information in the Amp block is used to calculate the frequency dependent heating whereas the Cab block uses a fixed set of data that is representative of a typical speaker.

Finally I've made the time constant adjustable. I did some more calculations and measurements and found that a typical guitar speaker is actually lower than what I had previously calculated because thinner wire is used than I was assuming. Regardless you can now set the thermal time constant to get whatever response rate feels best.
Can hardly wait!
 

NeoSound

Fractal Fanatic
As far as speaker drive and motor drive, I assume speaker drive adds the distortion character of a hard pushed speaker to the mix, and motor drive adds the compression character of a hard pushed speaker to the mix. ?
 
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