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Low Cut, High Cut

joegold

Fractal Fanatic
It can process stereo IRs. See the manual for details.

Wow.
I did not know that.
Guess I'll be looking at the manual when I get a chance.
I've never seen a stereo .syx file for the Axe.
Are there any links to any .syx files like this (formatted for Axe-II Original please) out there?
[Note: I just re-dl'd the Axe-II manual, to make sure I had the latest version, and I don't see any mention of this feature anywhere.
What page should I be looking on?]

And can Cab Lab 3 also create stereo IRs?
Sure doesn't look like it.
 
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joegold

Fractal Fanatic
Follow the link to the other thread I posted. Watch all the Youtube videos (the three ones) and you'll understand.

And for those who can be interested in mixing close mic and room mics :



I think I already understand a lot of what I need to understand about this for right now.
I had a head (paper mache´?) with headphone mics like this at one point (JVC?) when I was in my 20s.

Please save me some time, I don't want to wade through that other thread which I have glanced at before as well.
All I'd like right now is a link to some of these binaurally acquired IRs please, so I can try them briefly in my DAW.
 

joegold

Fractal Fanatic
I use 7kHz but have gone as low as 5kHz (dirty tones).

Likewise, I start high-passing at 120 Hz but regularly increase to 150 or 200 Hz.

I find I need to go above 8ohz on the lo cut too with several IRs that have too much bottom on their own.
And for some overdriven tones hi-cutting below 7500hz is also often called for.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
Wow.
I did not know that.
Guess I'll be looking at the manual when I get a chance.
I've never seen a stereo .syx file for the Axe.
Are there any links to any .syx files like this (formatted for Axe-II Original please) out there?
[Note: I just re-dl'd the Axe-II manual, to make sure I had the latest version, and I don't see any mention of this feature anywhere.
What page should I be looking on?]

And can Cab Lab 3 also create stereo IRs?
Sure doesn't look like it.

Semantics. Put an IR on the left and a different IR on the right. Stereo. By definition.
 

Coby

Inspired
I remember of a post in which Cliff said that he was thinking of making a direct correlation between the chosen cab and the parameters Low Res Freq, Low Res Q, Low Resonance...in other words, when you change the cab, the parameters will automatically adjust at the correct value. Is this idea still in the air?
 

B:ASSMASTER

Experienced
There's not a lot of useful information above 8k, it's just fizzy harmonic nonsense that fights with the "sparkle" of cymbals.
Not always the case. High-end boosting on clean guitars can breathe some air into them. I find that a high-shelf boost somewhere between 8kHz to 10kHz works great. If you have an EQ plugin that is pleasing and mellow, that's the one to use. You can dial in a sizable high-end boost. Don't be afraid. If things a getting slightly edgy from the high-shelf, this is where low-passing can come in handy to bring back some of that warmness. I keep the low-pass filter real gentle at a 6dB octave. And, the frequency where you set it is entirely up to the mix. You want them cooperative with the cymbals. Adjust the filter by ear with the drums going. Now, you may have some offending peaks from 5kHz to 10kHz. Just notch them out with your EQ plugin to get your guitar under control.

TL;DR - High-shelf boosting on clean guitars is wonderful.
 

B:ASSMASTER

Experienced
I use 7kHz but have gone as low as 5kHz (dirty tones).

Likewise, I start high-passing at 120 Hz but regularly increase to 150 or 200 Hz.
Yup. Sometimes you got to get a little aggressive (or extreme) with the filters. It's all about getting the guitars to sound the best in connection with the mix.
 
I just tried the recommendation stated at the beginning of this thread. I just have to say Thank You! This is big deal, I have been running IR's full out, without any high or low cut, trying to manage the low end and nasty high end (FRFR) in the amp block. I have been unsuccessful and have become frustrated with the whole thing, but this is really a great improvement. Massive actually. Great info. Thanks a million.
 

antcarrier

Power User
Since we've been talking about far field IRs... I'm in the process of putting together a far field IR collection. I have been capturing far field IRs in my spare time for a few years now, pretty much for my own use. It has been an expensive and time consuming process so I'm thinking I may have a go selling some just to help pay for some of the gear I've bought along the way (although I don't expect that it ever would). It would be a bit smaller than the other cab bundles going around, because capturing FF IRs without room reflections - and then finding the sweet spot for the mic in such a large area - is a PITA and takes forever (I captured nearly 250 mic positions of a single cab in my last session, yet only a handful of these I feel landed in the sweet spot).

Following a lot of practice and experimentation, I've been particularly happy with the IR I've made this year, and I do feel that they can provide an "in the room" experience when using a monitor - but also fit nicely in a mix. I had a IR capture session earlier this week, and have already used them for a session recording and am very pleased with the results.

I made this video the other day (already out it in the recordings area actually) - it is using an IR that I captured from my session this week. When I'm playing, it really does sound to me as though I'm playing through my cab. A bit more refined perhaps (and far more consistent due to the sweet spot being projected over a larger area), but the playing experience is every bit as good.

 
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Wolfenstein98k

Power User
I think you're missing my point. If my monitors are pumping out an exact replica of what the mic(s) heard 1" in front of the speaker, and if we assume that the speakers (monitor or guitar amp) cease to influence the sound once the sound has been produced, then the result that I hear - 10' away - should be the same as what I'd hear from the amp.

You're not hearing the sound of the cab, you're hearing the sound of a MIKED cab. Equivalent of standing 10' from the PA, not a cab. You CANNOT hear the plain cab from your monitors, because to simulate it you NEED to record it with a mic, and that "bakes in" that sound to the simulation.
 
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Since we've been talking about far field IRs... I'm in the process of putting together a far field IR collection. I have been capturing far field IRs in my spare time for a few years now, pretty much for my own use. It has been an expensive and time consuming process so I'm thinking I may have a go selling some just to help pay for some of the gear I've bought along the way (although I don't expect that it ever would). It would be a bit smaller than the other cab bundles going around, because capturing FF IRs without room reflections - and then finding the sweet spot for the mic in such a large area - is a PITA and takes forever (I captured nearly 250 mic positions of a single cab in my last session, yet only a handful of these I feel landed in the sweet spot).

Following a lot of practice and experimentation, I've been particularly happy with the IR I've made this year, and I do feel that they can provide an "in the room" experience when using a monitor - but also fit nicely in a mix. I had a IR capture session earlier this week, and have already used them for a session recording and am very pleased with the results.

I made this video the other day (already out it in the recordings area actually) - it is using an IR that I captured from my session this week. When I'm playing, it really does sound to me as though I'm playing through my cab. A bit more refined perhaps (and far more consistent due to the sweet spot being projected over a larger area), but the playing experience is every bit as good.



I'd definitely be interested. :)
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
OK, would you encourage producers (or anybody else) to make binaural IRs ?

I don't think so. The problem with that is then you're "double convolving" again. You're getting a simulated human head response and then listening to that with an actual human head. It's analogous to using IRs with a traditional guitar cabinet. IMO binaural recordings only work with headphones.
 

VanHalen

Inspired
IMO binaural recordings only work with headphones.

Yes exactly, headphones are needed to have this specific feeling of "cab in the room". You can't have it with monitor speakers.
This is really a great thing because a lot of users play with headphones. This kind of recording can also be heard through regular speakers but you loose something, some studios are specialized in this kind of recordings and some artists use this technique which is already old.

I must play with headphones more than 50% of the time so I have to use IRs and every time I do, I loose one dimension of the sound.
Being able to use a binaural (stereo) IR would help to thicken the sound. The perfect situation would be to mix with it close mic IRs (like in the last video I posted).

Being able to process/shoot longer IRs with the Axe/CabLab would be the ultimate experience/tool to play quietly or with in-ears on stage while you send another kind of signal processed with different IRs to the FOH.

To me, this kind of feature is the next step for any amp modeler designer.
 

Rex

Legend!
You don't say "No". Do you keep this kind of feature for an incoming Axe FX III ? ;)
We've had the ability to use stereo cabs for ages. There are plenty of reasons to keep them around that have nothing to do with binaural imaging. I don't see them going away.
 

greiswig

Power User
A far-field measurement is more than just pulling the mic back. You need to perform this measurement in a sufficiently large space so that there are no reflections from the walls and ceiling until AFTER the direct signal is obtained. The microphone, usually a measurement mic like an Earthworks, is setup to make a "ground plane" measurement. This means putting the mic capsule almost touching the floor. The signal captured by the mic is then the direct path first and any reflections occur later in time and can be removed. Another option is an anechoic chamber but that's even more impractical due to the scarcity of such chambers and the associated cost.

First off, thank you for this tip that started the thread. I think I've been trying to make too many adjustments in the amp block instead.

Re. Farfield IR's, what I read above leads me to think that a guy with one of those old, good Crown PZM mics that are pretty close to dead flat, good weather and a quiet neighborhood might be able to do a good job of getting a farfield IR? How close or far away, on or how far off axis, and so forth would be good to know as some general guidelines for a starting point, if I'm right.
 
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