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Low Cut, High Cut

GuttaLaser

Power User
Can this be a workaround about the "amp in the room" feel ?

Use Stereo Ultra/Res with a cab IR @ 0" and a cab IR @ 6" plus add Air and Room to both, use the lo-cut and hi-cut of the cab block, mix the two and use dephase if there are phasing issues

What about that?
 

deleted

Inspired
If a real speaker has a freq range that goes from 75 - 5000. Would you set the parameters in the AxeFx exactly the same?
It seems many people use a Low Cut accordingly or a bit higher but especially Hi Cut seems to be used above 5k often.
So I wonder if there is some extra percentage that has to be considered?
Sure it depends on the type of speaker but I guess there aren't much speakers that go above 5k?
 

Rex

Legend!
If a real speaker has a freq range that goes from 75 - 5000. Would you set the parameters in the AxeFx exactly the same?
It seems many people use a Low Cut accordingly or a bit higher but especially Hi Cut seems to be used above 5k often.
So I wonder if there is some extra percentage that has to be considered?
Sure it depends on the type of speaker but I guess there aren't much speakers that go above 5k?
There's no set formula for that. It depends on the speaker, how it was miked when the IR was shot, how you have the amp set up.... You gotta use your ears.
 

HarrySound

Power User
My view with this whole hi cut lo cut stuff is that these numbers like 80hz or 10k, or 7k etc don’t really help.
Be violent with it. Don’t worry about cutting away “too much” because you can add it back in if need be.
I’m having far better results combatting my room modes and monitor speakers resonance by lo cutting up around 120hz.
It’s made all the difference to high/mid gain tones.
Just really go for it and don’t worry about what speakers output in terms of frequency as it won’t help you.
They all say “use your ears” which always makes me roll my eyes but just kinda do that, because it works.
 

H13

Inspired
If a real speaker has a freq range that goes from 75 - 5000. Would you set the parameters in the AxeFx exactly the same?
It seems many people use a Low Cut accordingly or a bit higher but especially Hi Cut seems to be used above 5k often.
So I wonder if there is some extra percentage that has to be considered?
Sure it depends on the type of speaker but I guess there aren't much speakers that go above 5k?

Sure a speaker kinda sorta only goes up to 5k.

But the sound bouncing around a room and the noise a microphone picks up goes beyond that.
 

Clockwork Creep

Power User
I keep the preset without any cuts, and leave that to the sound guy for live performance, or the daw when recording. This gives a lot of flexibility to mix with the rest of the instruments.
 

deleted

Inspired
Thanks for all your comments. :)


Record something in your DAW and then use Fabfilter's Pro-Q 2 plugin. Set a low-pass at 5 kHz and then hit the headphones icon. You'll be surprised what you're cutting out. Filter slope also matters.

Didn't have the Fabfilter but I used the DAWs built in EQ instead and recorded a dry signal without a cab sim. You're right. There is quite a bit information above 5k. Comparing some settings with that I would say that cutting somewhere above 6.5k and 7.5k works good. Used a 12db slope as recommended by Cliff.
 

jesussaddle

Power User
This use of low and hi cut has become my first set of steps in creating or searching out a tone. One thing that also helps for me is to have a precise EQ Vst (I use the Fabfilter ProQ) on my PC that I can use to seek out the tone I want, and then go into the Axe FX II and duplicate the settings as best I can using a parametric EQ block. What Fabfilter allows is to increase the screen resolution, hone the precise frequencies, hone the type of EQ, and the degree (you can use a bell and set 90db cut and get a "surgical" cut).

The most important realization I had when figuring this out was that its hugely important when auditioning tones, to start with the idea that in the next hour/s of tone-searching, there will be ear-fatigue. If you eliminate the highs and lows sufficiently, this can reduce that issue tremendously, and you can always add back in the lows you want on the next session when your ears are fresh. It can pay to have a saved parametric EQ block called "ear-fatigue-prevention" or something like it, and just over-remove the bass a little. Then do most of your tone-searching with that engaged, and when ready to do final tweaking just remove, or copy and vary that block (when your ears are fresh).
 
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Doubleneck

Inspired
Cliff quote “My personal settings are Low Cut around 80 Hz and High Cut around 7500 Hz and Filter Slope set to 12 dB/octave but these are just a starting point.”

What is the difference between the Filter Slope set to 12 dB/octave vs 6db/octave?
 

jesussaddle

Power User
Cliff quote “My personal settings are Low Cut around 80 Hz and High Cut around 7500 Hz and Filter Slope set to 12 dB/octave but these are just a starting point.”

What is the difference between the Filter Slope set to 12 dB/octave vs 6db/octave?
It got me too. Its a weird lingo. Imagine a frequency graph, showing octaves going from left to right. At the bottom is the bottom octave - really low (o_o) and really narrow. The octaves start getting wider and wider as they go from left to right because they are doubling. If an EQ slope is cutting at a rate that can be expressed in octaves, its non-linear on a frequency graph. So in that form of graph the amount of slope will depend on where in it you are. If you are at the bottom where the lowest octave is, then the slope would drop n db's per octave, and appear to do so quickly.

But EQ interfacing, to be effective, compensates, so as you progress right you see more and more condensing of the data. Otherwise a 96 db drop, as in the Fabfilter ProQ, would vary if you slid it up in frequency, and the slope would increase.

It doesn't. Because the graph is non-linear relative to frequency, but linear relative to octaves, with each octave taking up the same left-to-right span.

Believe me, it took me a long time to notice this.
 

StickMan

Experienced
I often find that there's a small "sweet spot" on the low cut. A range where it goes from "boomy" to "not present" very quickly.
 

Tremonti

Fractal Fanatic
I use 7500 for the high cut but that's pretty close. Also be sure the filter is 2nd order (12 dB/oct.). It probably depends on your hearing as well. Despite playing in rock bands for 25 years and not wearing any hearing protection I can hear up to 15 kHz. If you hearing has been damaged by loud music then you may not be able to hear the effects.
What does the 6/12 db octave thing do? Always wondered.
 

iaresee

Administrator
Moderator
What does the 6/12 db octave thing do? Always wondered.
Changes the slope of the filter curve. Higher value, steeper slope. Technically the value is setting the point where the filter hits 45º of phase shift.

frequency-response-of-high-pass-filter.png
 
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