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What's the advantage of AC Power Supply Type and Ghost Notes?

GotMetalBoy

Power User
What am I missing out on if I set the Amp Block's Power Supply Type to DC? It seems to make my tone less cluttered sounding and removes Ghost Notes.

I was playing around with the Amp Block settings Master Volume, Sag, B+ Time Constant and AC Line Frequency but was able to get the best tone, especially for strummed and arpeggiated chords by setting the Amp Block's Power Supply Type to DC.

When the Amp Block's Power Supply Type is set to DC, are any other settings disabled?

I really don't have any clue what these settings do in the Axe-Fx II or real Tube Amps and was just turning knobs until my ears were happy but in this case it was more a flick of a switch. I read Cliff's Tech Notes about Ghost Notes but still feel Er... What? o_O haha


UPDATE:

If you want to hear what ghost notes sound like, use an amp model that has a master volume and use the settings below to exaggerate the ghost notes, so you can really hear them. Play some notes on the G string (3rd String).

* Try an amp model like CITRUS RV50
* Master Volume to maximum
* Sag to maximum
* B+ Time Constant to minimum 1ms
* AC Line Frequency start at 30 Hz and increase it to hear the ghost note's frequency change
 
Last edited:

BillyZeppa

Power User
There is an affect on the sound like the 'iron man' voice, but it is very small, so you can only hear it on some notes. Gained up it can be gnarly.
 

GotMetalBoy

Power User
On some amp models it almost sounds like fret buzz. It seems to be most pronounced on the G string. I actually thought it was fret buzz when I first started playing with the different settings but as soon as I changed the AC to DC all the noise disappeared. It's probably the most significant tone shaping tweak that I've discovered along with pre-EQ.

Using AC definitely adds attitude to single notes, so I'm going to play with the settings more for my solo presets.

I've had the Axe-Fx II for over 5 years but I feel like I just discovered a whole new amp. Best purchase I've ever made!
 

JJunkie

Power User
Years ago (axe ultra days) cliff told me that he didnt model ghost notes because he considered it to be an amp design error. His approach to modelling amps has completely changed since those days.
 

aziz

Power User
A little bit can be good, and if you don't want authenthic, you can switch it off or go crazy with it. I had one amp that was broken so that it had so strong ghost notes it was unusable. Like a ring modulator at 50hz, always on.
 

lauke-lux

Power User
Yes. One of the reason amps in Europe sound different than US.
Strange idea to make a musical travel of 6000 miles just by changing one parameter on the Axe Fx. Never ever thought of that, but surely didn't polarise my ears to that; will absolutely test this at home just for kicks.
 

GotMetalBoy

Power User
Strange idea to make a musical travel of 6000 miles just by changing one parameter on the Axe Fx. Never ever thought of that, but surely didn't polarise my ears to that; will absolutely test this at home just for kicks.
Also, try switching AC to DC to get rid of ghost notes. Some amp models seem to produce more ghost notes than others. For me it made my tone a lot clearer because I never realized how much the ghost notes were causing dissonant notes. Arpeggiated chords and solos sound more in tune. I always thought the G string sounded out of tune on all my guitars but it seems like ghost notes are loudest on that string.
 

GotMetalBoy

Power User
I saw two young hot women in G strings recently and was immediately visited by some very loud ghosts that were hard to tune out.
It's always difficult to talk about the G string with a straight face. Kind of like the time I had to call Schecter because I busted my nut on my Jazz 7 string and there weren't any places in my area that could fix it, so I contacted them for a replacement. :D
 

solo-act

Fractal Fanatic
It's always difficult to talk about the G string with a straight face. Kind of like the time I had to call Schecter because I busted my nut on my Jazz 7 string and there weren't any places in my area that could fix it, so I contacted them for a replacement. :D
A song that busts a nut is a song to love for all time LOL
 

GotMetalBoy

Power User
If you want to hear what ghost notes sound like, use an amp model that has a master volume and use the settings below to exaggerate the ghost notes, so you can really hear them. Play some notes on the G string (3rd String).

* Try an amp model like CITRUS RV50
* Master Volume to maximum
* Sag to maximum
* B+ Time Constant to minimum 1ms
* AC Line Frequency start at 30 Hz and increase it to hear the ghost note's frequency change
 
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