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Ooooh... Charts and Graphs

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Geoff

Inspired
Thanks to this forum, I think I've learned what aliasing is in concept and understand how this can affect the sound with unwanted frequency noise (thanks to the good example charts and commentary). I can see that the AXEIII has very good performance in this area. I read up on what sampling frequency to use and the meaning of oversampling as well and now have a better understanding of those as well.
Cliff and others - thanks for sharing your original post and explanations and being patient with the trolls/troublemakers.
 

bstaley

Inspired
Wanted to see if U caught that. Nice name on the original file you posted .

Be honest, you didn't want to see if he caught that. YOU got caught. That was pretty lame, and credit to Cliff for continuing to deal with you professionally. Considering your lack of expertise on the subject and your rudeness toward the owner of this forum, anything short of leaving with your tail between your legs is just continuing to embarrass yourself.
 

Sacha

Inspired
One nice thing with the Helix Native plugin is you can force over-sample in your DAW by mixing down the guitar tracks in a higher sample rate; this would likely help reduce the aliasing. Although, I still believe the Axe-FX oversamples even further (8 or 16x I think?).
 

yeky83

Power User
One nice thing with the Helix Native plugin is you can force over-sample in your DAW by mixing down the guitar tracks in a higher sample rate; this would likely help reduce the aliasing. Although, I still believe the Axe-FX oversamples even further (8 or 16x I think?).
The issue of aliasing within amp modelers doesn't happen at track sample rate (e.g. input 48 kHz vs. 192 kHz), but within the amp modeling. So it would depend on whether Helix Native plugin's amp models over-samples more than the hardware Helix unit.
 

axifist

Experienced
Is it (in theory) possible to get rid of aliasing altogether? Or would this result in a singularity of processing power?
 

ColemanEuclid

Inspired
I read every word of this entire thread.
90db of this went well over my head, and I now consider myself fully aliased.

I'm just glad there are some really smart people out there that have saved me from lugging so much gear around, and have me sounding better than ever. This has been quite an interesting read.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
Is it (in theory) possible to get rid of aliasing altogether? Or would this result in a singularity of processing power?

A high enough oversampling rate would effectively reduce the aliasing to where it's below the thermal noise. I'm too tired do the math right now on what rate would be required but it's probably at least 32x. Of course that brings a whole host of new problems. The CPU usage would double, filter instabilities would likely occur, etc., etc.

Analog circuits are analogous to a digital circuit with infinite sampling rate. Actually it can be argued that the sampling rate is some very high, finite value equal to the quantum time interval (in theory time is not continuous but quantized like everything else in the universe).
 

chucma

Fractal Fanatic
Actually it can be argued that the sampling rate is some very high, finite value equal to the quantum time interval (in theory time is not continuous but quantized like everything else in the universe).

Cool, so coming in ARES2.01 then.....!:D
 

axifist

Experienced
A high enough oversampling rate would effectively reduce the aliasing to where it's below the thermal noise. I'm too tired do the math right now on what rate would be required but it's probably at least 32x. Of course that brings a whole host of new problems. The CPU usage would double, filter instabilities would likely occur, etc., etc.
Ok 32x, in case it is the right value, is way beyond what todays hardware is capable, at least for low latency systems where multicores are to be avoided. So basically the better alias performance of the III compared to the II is based on the superior processing power? Or is it based on better code? If so, can it be ported to the II? I'm not saying you have to or should, but is there room for improvement for the II?
Analog circuits are analogous to a digital circuit with infinite sampling rate. Actually it can be argued that the sampling rate is some very high, finite value equal to the quantum time interval (in theory time is not continuous but quantized like everything else in the universe).
The quantization of things in the universe is based on a theory, but very well proven by experiments! Quantum theory is probably the best proven theory in physics. In this case one could say that analog amps also alias, but it's beyond any measureability.
 
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