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Axe-Fx II Firmware 19.01 Public Beta (1)

mongey

Inspired
Sounds interesting. Won't get a chance to try for a few days

Does the de phase add any time to scenes switching in a preset whet you use x and y Amps ?
 

symphx

Fractal Fanatic
thanks. one of my main complaints is phas'ish' sounding IR's cant wait to try. Course not sure I want to re audition 3200 IRs :)
 

steadystate

Fractal Fanatic
That's kinda what it does. It's something I've been actually working on for a couple years.
Time well spent. Holy shit. The only reason I never put this on a wish list is that I thought it wasn't possible. I know what I'm doing all day tomorrow. And THANKS!

PS: I'm curious as to whether Dephase can save even JM's far fields :D
 

APOGEE123

Experienced
wouldn't your setting on Dephase depend on the phase issue your dealing with on the cab ir ? so really there's no suggested setting of 5
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
Found this video;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_N0ER4A73QE

So the phase cancellation takes place between the left and right channel within the cab and the new parameter helps eliminate that?
No. Close-mic'd speakers can sound "phasey" because you are in the near field. When sampling the near field of any source the frequency response and beam pattern is rough. This occurs due to multiple spherical waves arriving at various phase angles. These multiple waves come from the various modes of the speaker, internal cabinet reflections and from other speakers in the cabinet. In the far field the response is more uniform because the wavefronts get flatter and the phase angles converge. The De-Phase parameter removes some of the phasiness due to multiple wave arrival using a complex FFT technique.

The near field IS useful and I actually designed a sonar that exploited the near field response years ago and then cross-faded to far field as you moved away from the transducer. Close mic'ing is, by definition, near field and that's why there is so much variation in the tone even moving the mic a fraction of an inch. However we guitar players are conditioned to hearing our cabinets in the far field so de-phasing can take a near field IR and give it some far field characteristics.

I should add that the the whole near/far field thing is exactly due to the way the waves converge. It's called the far field because the wavefronts are more-or-less in phase. The formula for the "near field to far field transition" is given roughly by d^2/lambda where lambda is the wavelength and d is the diameter of the piston (speaker), in meters. For a 12" speaker (0.3 m) at 500 Hz the transition occurs at 0.1/0.7 m (about 6 inches). At 1 kHz the transition is twice as far. As you go up in frequency the transition moves further away and the beam angle gets narrower. That's why guitar speakers "beam". The beam angle is given by lambda/d so the shorter the wavelength the narrower the beam for a given diameter. It's been many years since I did this stuff so I might have these formulas wrong.
 

steadystate

Fractal Fanatic
Interesting. Best of both worlds. I still can't understand why I've never heard a far field IR that I liked. The De-Phased near fields sound markedly better than the unprocessed near fields to my ears in this demo.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
Interesting. Best of both worlds. I still can't understand why I've never heard a far field IR that I liked. The De-Phased near fields sound markedly better than the unprocessed near fields to my ears in this demo.
Probably because there just aren't very many of them. It's very difficult to do a far field IR capture. You need a large space and special techniques. Your average studio guy doesn't have the space or the knowledge required. The only guy I know who has done them is Jay Mitchell but he only did a few. I think, like close mic'd IRs, that there is probably some learning curve and trial-and-error to getting good results. There's little money in IR capturing so there's little incentive for people to rent the necessary space and do the work.
 

Rex

Legend!
I still can't understand why I've never heard a far field IR that I liked. The De-Phased near fields sound markedly better than the unprocessed near fields to my ears in this demo.
With far-field captures, it's hard to get the room out of the capture. If you don't get the room out, and you play through that IR, the "room" in the IR plays out in the actual room you're playing in. You get an amp in the room in the room, and that doesn't work.
 

electronpirate

Moderator
Moderator
Probably because there just aren't very many of them. It's very difficult to do a far field IR capture. You need a large space and special techniques. Your average studio guy doesn't have the space or the knowledge required. The only guy I know who has done them is Jay Mitchell but he only did a few. I think, like close mic'd IRs, that there is probably some learning curve and trial-and-error to getting good results. There's little money in IR capturing so there's little incentive for people to rent the necessary space and do the work.
This is interesting, since I think there would be a market for them (quality ones at least...)

From a user (layman) standpoint, I tried out this new cab phase parameter, and it sent me off into adding it into every patch (and some EQ tweaking...I found the passive 5 band necessary on *some* amps). But the overall impression is that I POPPED into the mix. The dynamics and 'in your face' was readily apparent from the start. It's not obvious (to me) when playing alone, but in a mix, it was MUCH easier to find your place in the sonic landscape.

Huge thumbs up.
 

d2dark

Inspired
Probably because there just aren't very many of them. It's very difficult to do a far field IR capture. You need a large space and special techniques. Your average studio guy doesn't have the space or the knowledge required. The only guy I know who has done them is Jay Mitchell but he only did a few. I think, like close mic'd IRs, that there is probably some learning curve and trial-and-error to getting good results. There's little money in IR capturing so there's little incentive for people to rent the necessary space and do the work.
if I understand this correctly, to do good FF IR, you need somthing Like measurement mic in a anechoics chamber?
if the room do not reflect is it absent of capture?
 
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