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Is the new reverb classed as a convolution reverb?

Bojangles

Experienced
Im just wondering if the new reverb would be classed as a convolution rerverb

Dumb question i know, however i have a friend that cant talk reverbs unless its a convolution,

Personally id like to see his head explode in fall on the floor in a twitching mess by telling him the axefx now does a convolution reverb
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
No.

Your friend should talk to David Griesinger. He probably knows more about reverb than everyone else combined. He's the father of the Lexicon reverbs. According to him, and I have no reason to doubt him, real reverb (i.e. reverb from a real space) is actually inferior to synthetic reverb. This is due to human perception. Real reverb (and by extension convolution reverb) actually reduces intelligibility and clarity due to the particular nature of the decay, the decay being exponential. Synthetic reverb allows one to craft the decay curve thereby rendering improved clarity. If the decay curve is flat for a period and then exponential it doesn't clutter the desired program material.

The new reverb algorithms in the Axe-Fx are based on his theories.
 

Sharka

Experienced
No.

Your friend should talk to David Griesinger. He probably knows more about reverb than everyone else combined. He's the father of the Lexicon reverbs. According to him, and I have no reason to doubt him, real reverb (i.e. reverb from a real space) is actually inferior to synthetic reverb. This is due to human perception. Real reverb (and by extension convolution reverb) actually reduces intelligibility and clarity due to the particular nature of the decay, the decay being exponential. Synthetic reverb allows one to craft the decay curve thereby rendering improved clarity. If the decay curve is flat for a period and then exponential it doesn't clutter the desired program material.

The new reverb algorithms in the Axe-Fx are based on his theories.
Well... it can work on the shrieking souls of the damned for all I care. The new reverbs sound amazing! You guy's are stepping it up all the time and never quit.

Thank you!
 

pablito

Inspired
No.

Your friend should talk to David Griesinger. He probably knows more about reverb than everyone else combined. He's the father of the Lexicon reverbs. According to him, and I have no reason to doubt him, real reverb (i.e. reverb from a real space) is actually inferior to synthetic reverb. This is due to human perception. Real reverb (and by extension convolution reverb) actually reduces intelligibility and clarity due to the particular nature of the decay, the decay being exponential. Synthetic reverb allows one to craft the decay curve thereby rendering improved clarity. If the decay curve is flat for a period and then exponential it doesn't clutter the desired program material.

The new reverb algorithms in the Axe-Fx are based on his theories.
Cliff's attitude to teach us theories and other how to's, really makes me enjoy FAS more and more. What other company out there behaves like this. Congrats Fractal Audio.
 

Shask

Inspired
Cliff's attitude to teach us theories and other how to's, really makes me enjoy FAS more and more. What other company out there behaves like this. Congrats Fractal Audio.
I agree. I love reading these tidbits of information.

I made a DSP guitar processor as a project in college back in 2001 or so. You couldn't find a damn thing on the internet about how to accomplish this back then. It is amazing how much info is out there now. Sometimes I wish I could switch tracks and get back into DSP programming.
 

GuitarDojo

Moderator
Moderator
No.

Your friend should talk to David Griesinger. He probably knows more about reverb than everyone else combined. He's the father of the Lexicon reverbs. According to him, and I have no reason to doubt him, real reverb (i.e. reverb from a real space) is actually inferior to synthetic reverb. This is due to human perception. Real reverb (and by extension convolution reverb) actually reduces intelligibility and clarity due to the particular nature of the decay, the decay being exponential. Synthetic reverb allows one to craft the decay curve thereby rendering improved clarity. If the decay curve is flat for a period and then exponential it doesn't clutter the desired program material.

The new reverb algorithms in the Axe-Fx are based on his theories.
Teh Matrix has you!
 

jimfist

Fractal Fanatic
Would the longer Ultra-Res IRs qualify as "convolution" for early reflection "room" ambience? If so, then I guess you could say that the AxeFxII does do limited length convolution, right?
 

Stratoblaster

Fractal Fanatic
....real reverb (i.e. reverb from a real space) is actually inferior to synthetic reverb.
Hmmm interesting, kinda like how you can make 'idealized/better' guitar amps with modelling to 'exaggerate' the most desirable characteristics and eliminate ones that may not have a positive contribution to the overall tone and it's perception/feel...
 

Brick_top

Power User
No.

Your friend should talk to David Griesinger. He probably knows more about reverb than everyone else combined. He's the father of the Lexicon reverbs. According to him, and I have no reason to doubt him, real reverb (i.e. reverb from a real space) is actually inferior to synthetic reverb. This is due to human perception. Real reverb (and by extension convolution reverb) actually reduces intelligibility and clarity due to the particular nature of the decay, the decay being exponential. Synthetic reverb allows one to craft the decay curve thereby rendering improved clarity. If the decay curve is flat for a period and then exponential it doesn't clutter the desired program material.

The new reverb algorithms in the Axe-Fx are based on his theories.
Do you know him personally?
 

hippietim

Fractal Fanatic
There's a great line in one of his presentations:

"We can make a more natural recording by using artificial reflections and reverberation."

Too bad the same can't be done with food :)
 

pauly

Fractal Fanatic
Just close your eyes and listen.....beautiful reverbs regardless of the technology.
Thanks
Pauly
 

finleysound

Inspired
No.

Your friend should talk to David Griesinger. He probably knows more about reverb than everyone else combined. He's the father of the Lexicon reverbs. According to him, and I have no reason to doubt him, real reverb (i.e. reverb from a real space) is actually inferior to synthetic reverb. This is due to human perception. Real reverb (and by extension convolution reverb) actually reduces intelligibility and clarity due to the particular nature of the decay, the decay being exponential. Synthetic reverb allows one to craft the decay curve thereby rendering improved clarity. If the decay curve is flat for a period and then exponential it doesn't clutter the desired program material.

The new reverb algorithms in the Axe-Fx are based on his theories.
I’ve found algorithmic reverbs to sit better in my mixes. Of course I grew up in the age of Lexicon and Eventide reverbs so I’m probably biased.
 
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