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Axe-Fx Firmware Release Version 18.00 Public Beta

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notalemming

Fractal Fanatic
Per my earlier post, you should be able to adjust the output level to get the output level balanced.... :)
I know. That's the way it's been from day 1, Axe II MKI (and most likely the Standard & Ultra but I have never used one of those) & with literally every compressor ever made with auto make up gain. That still doesn't answer the question, why is auto makeup gain only optimized for humbuckers and only Cliff can accurately answer that.
 

artzeal

Experienced
Auto make up gain is an industry standard kind of thing, that pretty much every maker follows, AFAIK: Make up gain increases the level of the overall signal by the same amount RMS that it was reduced by the compression: This will not account for changes in the "perceived loudness" which will differ for any and every signal: With the same compressor settings: the effect of the lower input and/or greater dynamic swing from a twangy single coil on the compressor threshold results in having the peaks being clipped but less compression of the overall RMS average and will get less make up gain than a thicker humbucker that has the overall level affected more and with more requisite make up gain seems louder. Its the the nature of the beast and always has been. Single coils and humbuckers require different compression settings for similar results. Auto-make up gain does exactly what it says. It is NOT auto perceived loudness matching.
 
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maschoff

Experienced
@FractalAudio
I' sorry if this has been asked for but it would be great to also have an override function for the global speaker impedence curve. I'm currently using both power amp + cab and FRFR. Thus, I don't want to globally set the speaker impendance curve. With an override function I could globally set a curve matching my guitar cab and still use a patch specific curve with my FRFR setup.
I' with this guy ;) I see that the Global Speaker Impedance Curve is set to DEFAULT. I would assume this means that the Amp block curve is being used. So no effect unless you change it.
 

mr_fender

Axe-Master
That's not how it works. Changing the Global SIC does not alter existing presets unless you change amp models or reset the block. The amp block always uses the curve that is selected in the block.

The Global SIC setting only sets the default curve that gets selected when the amp block gets reset or you change amp models. You're always free to select any curve you want regardless of the Global SIC setting.
 

Lilarcor

Inspired
That's not how it works. Changing the Global SIC does not alter existing presets unless you change amp models or reset the block. The amp block always uses the curve that is selected in the block.

The Global SIC setting only sets the default curve that gets selected when the amp block gets reset or you change amp models. You're always free to select any curve you want regardless of the Global SIC setting.

I think I get it now. So what I asked for is already implemented just in a different, more simple way. 👍👍
 

Tahoebrian5

Fractal Fanatic
I really envy those who understand and hear how compressors work!
I don't know what to hear?
I do not know what, why to roll!
I do not know what, why?
What is a good compressor setting for a Fender Stratocaster?
I love the beautiful clear sounds!
Below is the best video I’ve come across that demonstrates what you can really do with a compressor. There are plenty of descriptions of what compressors due but just saying they’re decrease dynamic range is not really helpful.

Here is what to listen for (in my opinion). And there are more than one uses:

1) listen for how the source material takes on a sense of movement. if you get the attack and release just right it will pump a tiny bit and can add life and ends up sounding more interesting. You really notice when turning it off it will sound dead and 2d.

2) if you just want to decrease dynamic range or decrease transients. This one is pretty easy to hear. Faster attack based on how much transient you want to kill, medium release

3) volume leveling.. not much to listen for other than just keeping the levels closer to even. Slowish attack medium release

with that in mind listen to how this guy runs different sources through some settings. its easiest to hear in the drums and once you get an ear for it you can apply it to guitar.

I ended up buying an 1176 and La2a after watching this. They are magic.

 
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