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Strap locks

MaxTaylorGrant

Inspired
I'm a big fan of both the Schaller dual button guys and DiMarzio's Cliplock ones. Only problem I had with Cliplocks before is the strap was always too long, but the JP signature solved that.
 

pima1234

Fractal Fanatic
Those guitar savers aren't a bad idea, but I imagine a pain to take off once they're on. And maybe a tad pricey for only 3 pairs?
 

mwd

Power User
Schaller. Smooth and positive. Never an issue. 4 years for me on about 5 straps.
 

pima1234

Fractal Fanatic
I do really like the elliptical shape strap buttons. That makes a big difference.

Elliptical , Ibanez V shaped , or SRV Lenny Diamond strap buttons work just as well as strap locks. Best out of the three is the Ibanez V shaped . It'll keep your strap secure!
 

klaushouz

Experienced
I have had 2 failures with Dunlups. They unscrew the button if you don't lube them regularly, as per the instructions. I did lube them, but apparently not regularly enough! I now use Lock-It straps with a built in metal lock slider. Nothing to modify. No maintenance. Fits any git. I particularly like the 2 " cotton ones, white and black They are very cool. Here is a Sweetwater link for infoLock-It Straps | Sweetwater.com
 

mr_fender

Axe-Master
Schallers for me. When installed correctly, the main body of the lock supports the weight of the guitar and the pin only keeps it locked in position. A dab of loc-tite on the threads keep them from working loose from the strap over time. I also like the fact that you have to pull the pin out to release. The Dunlop push button is a little easier to accidentally depress. Both designs work fine for general use, so it's mostly just personal preference. I've never been foolish enough to swing my prized instruments over my head or anything. Many nice guitars have met their demise from drunken strap toss attempts. YouTube has the hilarious yet sad proof.
 

boltrecords

Fractal Fanatic
I've always used schallers too but I'm starting to notice more often that the strap locks will slowly loosen the strap button from the guitar. More so on the heavy les Paul's I have. I think I may try a small amount of WD40 or something in the strap lock to reduce some friction
Other than that I've always stuck with schallers


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Hellbat

Fractal Fanatic
The Schallers should never pop out of the shoe if the locking pin is operating properly. That said, on guitars with the strap button at the base of the neck the knob at the end of the locking pin can poke you in the belly or more sensitive areas if you play your guitar low.

The negative on the Dunlops is a little similar. They sit up on top on the strap button, but they are kind of pancake shaped with the lock button in a recess, so they spread out the poke. But with my one guitar with the Dunlops, they are quite tall. I think they may also offer a recessed model but you have to feel confident with a drill and your guitar for those ones.
 

BrainalLeakage

Experienced
I used Dunlop for about 6 months, till one just let go for no good reason. I had to buy new tuners, and repair a crack on my headstock. Schallers ever since. Just remember to tighten the living crap out of the strap side. I use two wrenches one on the nut, and the other on the horseshoe, and go to town on it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Rich G.

Experienced
I used Schallers from the mid 80's up until about 5 years ago. I've since switched to Dunlop and haven't had any problems. All my guitars are equipped with Dunlop buttons now. Go HERE for more detail on the problems I had with Schallers.
 

Zwiebelchen

Fractal Fanatic
If you discover and try Schallers, be aware that the "horseshoe" on the strap side can rotate 180 degrees, leaving the guitar in a vulnerable position. I definitely damaged a guitar once thanks to Schaller strap locks. I still use them, I just check the position every single time.
Also, on thicker straps, the nut tends to get loose over time so there's a bit of maintenance involved.
 
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