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Still killing it - Fractal AX-8, Boss EV-30, Shure GLXD

Scott Peterson

Global Moderator
Moderator
Just a little update on the rig as it is and has been.

Been playing most every weekend between 2-3 gigs the past year and a half and the rig's been great. Running direct to FOH the past year and a few months running with IEM's (64 Audio A-3) and it's been stellar. Very satisfied.

It's been 2-3 years now with the Fractal Audio AX-8, just still loving this box. It's everything I need and nothing I don't. I do miss some of the more esoteric stuff I used to have available on the rack units effects wise but none of that is necessary for the gigs I do. I primarily use Fender Twin, Vox AC-30TB, Plexi and JCM800 tones with OwnHammer IR's. We do rock, country, pop covers from the '60's to now. I also do P&W weekly. You can see the effects blocks I favor. Expression pedals are (from left to right): wah, 'gain' (amp input gains; also solo boost gain); Wet/Dry for effects and the final pedal on the right is for delay wet/dry mix) Double duty for pedal 3 is as a volume pedal when I use that.

Pedalboard is the massive and dependable Pedaltrain Pro; carrying case is a Mono (expensive but worth every penny). Power is supplied by the Pedaltrain Power from a long time ago, still working. Note the LED light strip that slowly rotates colors RGB style. Still cool IMHO. LOL.

Had the Shure GLXD Wireless for 3 or 4 (?) years - almost flawless across the whole time. When I bought it, I bought an extra battery and still swapping those same two batteries to this day. They still last a week or two each. Not bad. I've worn out one cable from the guitar to the transmitter pack now; on the second one.

Just updated the board with the Boss EV-30 expression pedals. Dave Torn was demoing in the Fryette booth with them at NAMM; good enough for David, good enough for me. Gigged two shows with them now and they are great. I added a 4th pedal and shaved 4lbs from the board versus my old setup with Mission Expression pedals (3 of them). These EV-30's are smooth, have a great sweep and I dig the cam design inside it. Smart, sturdy and the right size. I added the red reflective tape; IMHO that was a smart move. We played a new place last week Friday and Saturday and they were great.


Here's what the board looks like now:

LSxuOi7.jpg
 

Matt_B_77

Power User
I agree that Mono bags are worth it. I have one that I use for my MFC-101 and the AX-8 rig (also have one of their electric guitar bags as well).

I just got my AX-8 at Christmas (Axe FX user since 2007, bought a II XL+ in '16) and I really dig its form factor. After using the rack units for years I came to realize that my needs are fulfilled with the AX-8.
 

Scott Peterson

Global Moderator
Moderator
Very nice. What do you use all the expression pedals for? I'm looking for inspiration
Expression pedals are used for (from left to right): wah, 'gain' (amp input gains; also solo boost gain); Wet/Dry for effects and the final pedal on the right is for delay wet/dry mix) Double duty for pedal 3 is as a volume pedal when I use that.
 

Matt_B_77

Power User
I admire folks that have more than one expression pedal in their rigs because you can do so much with them, even if you're not doing intensive things with effects.

When I was planning out my AX-8 right I -almost- went with 2 expression pedals (1 dedicated to global volume) but opted to keep the rig as compact as possible.
 

Brian Coonan

Power User
I admire folks that have more than one expression pedal in their rigs because you can do so much with them, even if you're not doing intensive things with effects.

When I was planning out my AX-8 right I -almost- went with 2 expression pedals (1 dedicated to global volume) but opted to keep the rig as compact as possible.
I JUST got another one that I’m hoping I can put to good use with things like delay, reverb, drive, parameters. It will probably end up being a volume pedal. Hahah. Plus, there was space in my pedal board so there was no extra effort really. :).
 

Paulinfl

Inspired
Awesome OP! Some of your reviews sold me on FAS a long time ago and I’m still going too. My AX8 board is very similar with the Shure GLXD. Love that setup- it is convienant as can be. Killer board!
 

Scott Peterson

Global Moderator
Moderator
What are your opinions on the A-3 IEMs? I've been using the V6s (not the V6) and I find them merely acceptable... Definitely not inspiring.

I'm sure it's probably an EQ thing, but a) I suck at EQing and b) nobody else can EQ your custom IEMs :(
I think they are brilliant. I don' t EQ for them. They are very good for monitoring. The A-3's a remarkable monitor for live work, very honest and non-fatiguing. At the NAMM show, I got to try out many of the models from 64 Audio; the top model to check out was the A-12's. If I knew then what I know now, I'd reach for the moon and go for the higher end models (maybe not the 12's) but for live work, they are fantastic. The fit and finish is spectactular. They seal perfectly. The tech with the pressure relief is brilliant. You can sing without that 'stuffy' head voice.

All that said, they are not flat. They have a mid bias, which for live work I find highly effective and userful. They are clear at volume; but the higher end IEMs just are smoother overall and more pleasing IMHO.

So I do find my A-3's inspiring? Yes. They are exceptional IMHO compared especially to even most 3 driver Shure's and Ultimate Ears that I've used in the past.
 

unix-guy

Legend!
I think they are brilliant. I don' t EQ for them. They are very good for monitoring. The A-3's a remarkable monitor for live work, very honest and non-fatiguing. At the NAMM show, I got to try out many of the models from 64 Audio; the top model to check out was the A-12's. If I knew then what I know now, I'd reach for the moon and go for the higher end models (maybe not the 12's) but for live work, they are fantastic. The fit and finish is spectactular. They seal perfectly. The tech with the pressure relief is brilliant. You can sing without that 'stuffy' head voice.

All that said, they are not flat. They have a mid bias, which for live work I find highly effective and userful. They are clear at volume; but the higher end IEMs just are smoother overall and more pleasing IMHO.

So I do find my A-3's inspiring? Yes. They are exceptional IMHO compared especially to even most 3 driver Shure's and Ultimate Ears that I've used in the past.
Thanks for your input. Are you using only IEMs or do you have guitar coming from a monitor or backline, too? We are silent stage... I find them much more enjoyable if there's also guitar coming from another source on stage.

I do agree the quality of fit and finish is excellent, and yes, I know from the specs that mine also have a mid bump.
 

Paulinfl

Inspired
I find them much more enjoyable if there's also guitar coming from another source on stage.

Agreed in general. I use Westone AM30 Pro's like this. And man is it just a killer sound when there's another source outside -doesnt have to be loud though. Alone good, but with an on stage amp (Powerstage 170 and a 1x12 for me) just adds killer feel, and what I hear is just beautiful. Add a couple CLR's in stereo on either side and OMG! lol The III handles all of this nicely btw!
 

Scott Peterson

Global Moderator
Moderator
Thanks for your input. Are you using only IEMs or do you have guitar coming from a monitor or backline, too? We are silent stage... I find them much more enjoyable if there's also guitar coming from another source on stage.

I do agree the quality of fit and finish is excellent, and yes, I know from the specs that mine also have a mid bump.
We roll with everyone on IEMs, no amps, no cabs, no monitors on stage. Our drummer is still on an analog kit but the stage is quiet other than the drum kit and cymbals.

That said, we have done benefits and festivals with a backline. I have no issues with it. However, I do not feel it's advantageous or disadvantageous. The only bleed we have in the mics right now are drums; that makes mixing from stage (which I also handle) easier and the results are better.

There is one 400lb gorilla in the room though - lack of sustained feedback without an audio source like a speaker on stage. I am *seriously* considering a Freekout pedal to address that. I do *do* miss that.
 

BobBrault

Inspired
We roll with everyone on IEMs, no amps, no cabs, no monitors on stage. Our drummer is still on an analog kit but the stage is quiet other than the drum kit and cymbals.

That said, we have done benefits and festivals with a backline. I have no issues with it. However, I do not feel it's advantageous or disadvantageous. The only bleed we have in the mics right now are drums; that makes mixing from stage (which I also handle) easier and the results are better.

There is one 400lb gorilla in the room though - lack of sustained feedback without an audio source like a speaker on stage. I am *seriously* considering a Freekout pedal to address that. I do *do* miss that.

Our band is using the same monitoring setup. The 5 of us using IEMs. Vocal, guitar, keys, bass, drums. All instruments direct to board and drummer is using a Roland TD-20 kit. Therefore, absolutely no stage sound. It makes for a very clean mix, both in-ears and FOH. Ditto on the guitar feedback issue. I have to find a spot on my board for a Freq-Out.
 
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