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A good settings for ducking the delay

slashy

Inspired
Hi, I like The Mono Tape delay, but i would want a good setting for the ducker.I don't understand very well the actions of the ducker.
I would want a low volume delay when i play many notes and a high volume delay for the sustained notes.Thank in advance.
 

Admin M@

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
To gain basic understanding try extreme settings in an experiment. Start with a "hot" delay mix of about 50%.

The first way you might do this is to set DUCKER ATTENUATION to 80 dB and then adjust the DUCKER THRESHOLD, from the top down—starting at 0.0 and lowering it to hear how ducking kicks in. This will teach you where your threshold is most dynamic.

Another good experiment is to set the THRESHOLD all the way down to -80dB and then increase the DUCKER ATTENUATION from 0-dB upwards. This helps you understand what a reduction of "X" dB sounds like.

Once you have extreme ducking dialed in, you can play with RELEASE to see how it works.

After this, you should be able to set all three controls so they suit your needs.
 

unix-guy

Legend!
I think it's definitely a personal thing... When i use ducking, I am trying to "unclutter" the sound while I am playing but allow the delay to be there when I am not actively playing.

I set the Threshold to -80 and the Attenuation to -16db, with other settings at default. My delay is usually set with a low Mix (about 10%) and low feedback (15-20%).
 

calleballe11

Inspired
To gain basic understanding try extreme settings in an experiment. Start with a "hot" delay mix of about 50%.

The first way you might do this is to set DUCKER ATTENUATION to 80 dB and then adjust the DUCKER THRESHOLD, from the top down—starting at 0.0 and lowering it to hear how ducking kicks in. This will teach you where your threshold is most dynamic.

Another good experiment is to set the THRESHOLD all the way down to -80dB and then increase the DUCKER ATTENUATION from 0-dB upwards. This helps you understand what a reduction of "X" dB sounds like.

Once you have extreme ducking dialed in, you can play with RELEASE to see how it works.

After this, you should be able to set all three controls so they suit your needs.
This explanation is so good it should be on the wiki
 

mmpete

Experienced
I think it's definitely a personal thing... When i use ducking, I am trying to "unclutter" the sound while I am playing but allow the delay to be there when I am not actively playing.

I set the Threshold to -80 and the Attenuation to -16db, with other settings at default. My delay is usually set with a low Mix (about 10%) and low feedback (15-20%).
^^^^ almost the same settings as these. I usually apply about -6db to ducking for the same reasons - clean up the sound when playing notes but hear the tails in the gaps or when a phrase ends.
 

Smittefar

Fractal Fanatic
That would be way too extreme for me. I don't like the delays to jump in and out, they should just gently fall to the background while playing.

I really like @Admin M@ 's method
 

Tahoebrian5

Fractal Fanatic
Am I the only one that doesn't like ducking? I want to be able to stop playing and not have a mess of echoes, but I like a little delay while I'm playing so it's not so dry.
 

unix-guy

Legend!
That would be way too extreme for me. I don't like the delays to jump in and out, they should just gently fall to the background while playing.

I really like @Admin M@ 's method
I think it depends on your Mix and Feedback settings as to whether it "jumps out"... Try the settings I mentioned, you might be surprised.
 

Big Joe Daddy

Experienced
I think it's definitely a personal thing... When i use ducking, I am trying to "unclutter" the sound while I am playing but allow the delay to be there when I am not actively playing.

I set the Threshold to -80 and the Attenuation to -16db, with other settings at default. My delay is usually set with a low Mix (about 10%) and low feedback (15-20%).
Unix-Guy,
I just toyed with your ducking settings and I must say that's a nicely balanced configuration. Really cleans things up. Thanks for the tip.
BJD
 
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