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Vendor York Audio Master Thread - Newest Cab Pack: VX15 Blue

Dolphinado

Member
The differences are pretty major between the three you mentioned. The new OS compared Bipolar OS is much smoother in the midrange, clearer in the lows, and less harsh in the top end, so it doesn’t hurt as much when you crank it up. It’s a different speaker, different gear, different room, and a much more useful feature set....basically three more years of experience in getting higher quality and better captures between the two.

The OS and Traditional cabs have very different sonic signatures to them. The OS is just BIG... the lows and deeper and it has a little more air on the top end compared to the Trad. The Trad has a tighter low end and is more mid-forward and aggressive IMO. I made a clip at post #90 that compares the two with the same mic position (with a single 57) and same amp and settings to hear the differences between the two.
Thanks so much for your help!!

I ended up getting both the latest Mesa Traditional and OS cab bundles and wooooow, they are both really different, and really good. I've been using Mix 01 from the Traditional cab the most lately - I've found it's pretty much perfect whenever I wanna take a solid rhythm tone and make it sound meaner and angrier - I think I actually yelled "OHHHH!" at the screen when I started trying it out on some of my presets (so far, I've tried it out with a Mark IIC++, a Diezel VH4, a 5153 100W Blue, and a 5150 Block Letter). Interestingly enough, I've found that a lot of presets tailored for a blend of the 4x12 Recto ST 57M C YA + 4x12 Recto ST 121 Brt YA stock cabs from your old Bipolar bundle (aka the Leon Todd special) sound incredible with Mix 01, with few or no tweaks. Phew, I've gotta catch my breath now o_O
 

Callan

Experienced
Hey @York Audio The manual is (intentionally?) a little vague on mic positions for the single captures.

Is there any order to them at all?
is #1 your favourite, or your recommended starting position?
or is it simply "here are 5 or 6 good captures"?

thanks!
 

York Audio

Experienced
Vendor
Hey @York Audio The manual is (intentionally?) a little vague on mic positions for the single captures.

Is there any order to them at all?
is #1 your favourite, or your recommended starting position?
or is it simply "here are 5 or 6 good captures"?

thanks!
I always recommend starting with the Mixes first and then moving to singles. The shots are various sweet spots on the speaker. And since no two cabs or speakers are the same, the sweet spots vary as well from mic to mic. It gives you more tonal variety with fewer shots. So no, there isn’t an order to them. Just choose the one with the color you like, tweak your amp, and that’s it. :)
 

Callan

Experienced
I always recommend starting with the Mixes first and then moving to singles. The shots are various sweet spots on the speaker. And since no two cabs or speakers are the same, the sweet spots vary as well from mic to mic. It gives you more tonal variety with fewer shots. So no, there isn’t an order to them. Just choose the one with the color you like, tweak your amp, and that’s it. :)
Thanks Justin, Yep I'm starting at the mixes for sure, but also time-to-time I like to experiment.
I will play through a bunch of IR's - listening for differences between them, and starting to develop personal preferences for when each might be used.
Rather than trying to hear 5 very similar flavours of an SM57 on-axis of a single speaker cab, I am pulling out one from each mic type and putting them together in the user bank, to allow me to scroll through them quickly.
I'll start with the #1 capture from each mic, I think it'll serve my current purposes fine.

I'm like a 4 year old learning to paint - I want to choose from blue, green, red and yellow.
I'm not yet at the point where I need royal blue, navy blue, dark blue, strong blue, blue blue, kinda blue, green blue.. etc.
 

York Audio

Experienced
Vendor
Thanks Justin, Yep I'm starting at the mixes for sure, but also time-to-time I like to experiment.
I will play through a bunch of IR's - listening for differences between them, and starting to develop personal preferences for when each might be used.
Rather than trying to hear 5 very similar flavours of an SM57 on-axis of a single speaker cab, I am pulling out one from each mic type and putting them together in the user bank, to allow me to scroll through them quickly.
I'll start with the #1 capture from each mic, I think it'll serve my current purposes fine.

I'm like a 4 year old learning to paint - I want to choose from blue, green, red and yellow.
I'm not yet at the point where I need royal blue, navy blue, dark blue, strong blue, blue blue, kinda blue, green blue.. etc.
The different shots tend to lend themselves to different guitars and amps. I recommend running the amp dirty or with an overdrive in front of it to showcase more of the character in each file. Clean tones are very forgiving, but overdriven tones give you more detail and paint a better picture of how the cab sounds.

I hope you enjoy them. Let me know if I can help you in any way.

-Justin
 

Dolphinado

Member
@York Audio I've been doing a lot of experimenting with different IRs on a track lately for a lead guitar sound, where I already have a rhythm guitar sound dialed in (using YA MES 412 TRAD Mix 01). I pretty much have the sound I want for leads dialed in now (minus any last mile tweaking for the specific IR I end up choosing), but I don't like the rhythm guitar IR on leads on this song - it's too aggressive and focused, where I want something more full and midrangy (I think). I've been testing out both different mix IRs of the same cab, mix IRs from the new Mesa OS cab, and also some totally different IRs of completely unrelated cabs (e.g. Orange, Friedman).

The problem I've been having is that, other than using the same rhythm guitar IR (TRAD Mix 01) on my lead guitar track, none of the other IR approaches I've tried sound like they exist in the same universe as my rhythm guitar tone - they almost sound like someone mashed up recordings from 2 different bands from 2 different eras, if that makes sense. It's been tough because I can hear that I've got the right lead guitar tone for the song "underneath" the cab, but I don't have the right "filter" on it from the cab block to make it occupy the sonic space in the arrangement that I want it to.

I've gotten the sense that folks tend to stick with one IR (single or mix) for a whole recording, on every track, and just swap the amps out for different tones, but I have no idea if that's a best practice or not. Maybe using multiple IRs of different cabs on a recording is a bad idea?

Do you have any recommendations for what to try to get the right sort of IR "shape" I'm looking for without it sounding like a mashup of 2 totally different recordings?

(Also let me know if this makes sense! It's kinda hard to explain.)
 
@York Audio . I've learnt from Leon Todd that one of the great factory cab combos to use are the YA 842 & 848 with a -6db or -9b setting on the R121 IR. I love this combination and find it works brilliantly with all of my favourite high gain amps. But, like many of us, I'm always striving for something better and I'm wondering whether there is a mix in your new Mesa IR pack compared to the old Bipolar Pack (which I bought last year) that you think improves on this factory combination? I'm after that perfectly balanced IR that doesn't emphasize lows, mids or highs - just presents the qualities of the amp model in the purest sense. For me the 842/848 combo gives the perfect balance of eq but if I can 'upgrade' to the same but with more quality to the tone, I'm in! Hope this makes sense.
 

York Audio

Experienced
Vendor
@York Audio I've been doing a lot of experimenting with different IRs on a track lately for a lead guitar sound, where I already have a rhythm guitar sound dialed in (using YA MES 412 TRAD Mix 01). I pretty much have the sound I want for leads dialed in now (minus any last mile tweaking for the specific IR I end up choosing), but I don't like the rhythm guitar IR on leads on this song - it's too aggressive and focused, where I want something more full and midrangy (I think). I've been testing out both different mix IRs of the same cab, mix IRs from the new Mesa OS cab, and also some totally different IRs of completely unrelated cabs (e.g. Orange, Friedman).

The problem I've been having is that, other than using the same rhythm guitar IR (TRAD Mix 01) on my lead guitar track, none of the other IR approaches I've tried sound like they exist in the same universe as my rhythm guitar tone - they almost sound like someone mashed up recordings from 2 different bands from 2 different eras, if that makes sense. It's been tough because I can hear that I've got the right lead guitar tone for the song "underneath" the cab, but I don't have the right "filter" on it from the cab block to make it occupy the sonic space in the arrangement that I want it to.

I've gotten the sense that folks tend to stick with one IR (single or mix) for a whole recording, on every track, and just swap the amps out for different tones, but I have no idea if that's a best practice or not. Maybe using multiple IRs of different cabs on a recording is a bad idea?

Do you have any recommendations for what to try to get the right sort of IR "shape" I'm looking for without it sounding like a mashup of 2 totally different recordings?

(Also let me know if this makes sense! It's kinda hard to explain.)
First of all, I’m happy that you’re liking these. I should be sleeping now, but want to see if I can help a little before heading to bed.

I think if your rhythm tone is feeling great, there’s no need to complicate things by adding other IR’s into the mix. However, I can give you some cool things to try when I’ve got more time to respond. In the meantime, it sounds like you can get what you’re after with either a drive in front of the amp like a Tube Screamer with the tone knob rolled back, or you can use an EQ in front or after the amp that boosts a little midrange and cuts top end, or you can use a different amp for the leads with the same cab to keep tonal consistency, but a gain and EQ structure that gives it nice separation. Using an amp that’s a little darker and mid-forward may be the ticket, like the HBE or Atomica High.

And feel free to PM me the clip you’re working on. I may be able to help you better once I can hear what you’re hearing. :)


@York Audio . I've learnt from Leon Todd that one of the great factory cab combos to use are the YA 842 & 848 with a -6db or -9b setting on the R121 IR. I love this combination and find it works brilliantly with all of my favourite high gain amps. But, like many of us, I'm always striving for something better and I'm wondering whether there is a mix in your new Mesa IR pack compared to the old Bipolar Pack (which I bought last year) that you think improves on this factory combination? I'm after that perfectly balanced IR that doesn't emphasize lows, mids or highs - just presents the qualities of the amp model in the purest sense. For me the 842/848 combo gives the perfect balance of eq but if I can 'upgrade' to the same but with more quality to the tone, I'm in! Hope this makes sense.
The Bipolar Pack was the first thing I ever released back in 2017. Since then, I’ve learned a lot and refined the capture process. The short of it is that the new stuff is better quality. I think the low end is more defined, the midrange is smoother, and the top end is more musical compared to the Bipolar Mesa. I think you’ll find your happy place with Mix 01 or 02 from the new pack. They should feel familiar, but better.

Let me know if you have any other questions. I gotta get some sleep now. :)
 
First of all, I’m happy that you’re liking these. I should be sleeping now, but want to see if I can help a little before heading to bed.

I think if your rhythm tone is feeling great, there’s no need to complicate things by adding other IR’s into the mix. However, I can give you some cool things to try when I’ve got more time to respond. In the meantime, it sounds like you can get what you’re after with either a drive in front of the amp like a Tube Screamer with the tone knob rolled back, or you can use an EQ in front or after the amp that boosts a little midrange and cuts top end, or you can use a different amp for the leads with the same cab to keep tonal consistency, but a gain and EQ structure that gives it nice separation. Using an amp that’s a little darker and mid-forward may be the ticket, like the HBE or Atomica High.

And feel free to PM me the clip you’re working on. I may be able to help you better once I can hear what you’re hearing. :)



The Bipolar Pack was the first thing I ever released back in 2017. Since then, I’ve learned a lot and refined the capture process. The short of it is that the new stuff is better quality. I think the low end is more defined, the midrange is smoother, and the top end is more musical compared to the Bipolar Mesa. I think you’ll find your happy place with Mix 01 or 02 from the new pack. They should feel familiar, but better.

Let me know if you have any other questions. I gotta get some sleep now. :)
Thank you Justin. Purchasing now ;)
 

Phosphenetre

New Member
@York Audio, have you considered the idea of the manual for each cab having a short description or comment about the mixes, beyond just stating what mics were used? Could be something like 'Mix 01 is best suited for brighter amps and has a warm top end, but with healthy upper midrange cut to keep the tone present but not too sizzly'. Some of the packs have quite a few mixes, and for someone just getting to know the cab and pack, a short comment on each mix could really help as a quick start. Plus, it sounds like it could be fun to write about.
 

York Audio

Experienced
Vendor
@York Audio, have you considered the idea of the manual for each cab having a short description or comment about the mixes, beyond just stating what mics were used? Could be something like 'Mix 01 is best suited for brighter amps and has a warm top end, but with healthy upper midrange cut to keep the tone present but not too sizzly'. Some of the packs have quite a few mixes, and for someone just getting to know the cab and pack, a short comment on each mix could really help as a quick start. Plus, it sounds like it could be fun to write about.
I may be able to do something like that. So much of the blending process is just following tonal intuition and feeling when a mix is right. I also don’t want to describe something in a way that makes people overlook a mix based on a description rather than trying it and letting their ears decide if it’s what they’re after or not. So much of it relies on the player’s hands, guitars, and amps as well, so finding universal language for all of that will be the challenge.

That’s one of the reasons why I don’t use mic names in mixes anymore. A lot of people are surprised when they find a mic they don’t normally like ends up being the shining star in the mix they connect with.

You’ve given me something cool to think about though, and I appreciate that. :)
 

sluice

Member
I may be able to do something like that. So much of the blending process is just following tonal intuition and feeling when a mix is right. I also don’t want to describe something in a way that makes people overlook a mix based on a description rather than trying it and letting their ears decide if it’s what they’re after or not. So much of it relies on the player’s hands, guitars, and amps as well, so finding universal language for all of that will be the challenge.

That’s one of the reasons why I don’t use mic names in mixes anymore. A lot of people are surprised when they find a mic they don’t normally like ends up being the shining star in the mix they connect with.

You’ve given me something cool to think about though, and I appreciate that. :)
That would be amazing!
 

York Audio

Experienced
Vendor
Here's another one for the Class-A fans. I give you.... The York Audio VX15 112 Blue Cab Pack! Based on a Vox Handwired AC15 with an English Alnico Blue, and might I say, it sounds pretty great. Here's a quick clip I made with it using the Class-A 30w Top Boost model and Mix 03. I hope you enjoy it!

 

2112

Fractal Fanatic
Here's another one for the Class-A fans. I give you.... The York Audio VX15 112 Blue Cab Pack! Based on a Vox Handwired AC15 with an English Alnico Blue, and might I say, it sounds pretty great. Here's a quick clip I made with it using the Class-A 30w Top Boost model and Mix 03. I hope you enjoy it!

That clip sounds magical!
 

Dave Merrill

Inspired
Thanks! I used my signature Hagstrom Super Viking, which has a P-90 in the neck and a humbucker in the bridge. The middle position on that guitar is just magical.
Cool, that explains why it sounds sort of like some guitars I'm more familiar with, but not really.

Didn't know you had a signature model with them. My first electric, back in 7th grade, was a baby blue Hagstrom I. Long ago...
 

York Audio

Experienced
Vendor
Cool, that explains why it sounds sort of like some guitars I'm more familiar with, but not really.

Didn't know you had a signature model with them. My first electric, back in 7th grade, was a baby blue Hagstrom I. Long ago...
Yeah man, I've been with Hagstrom for about eight years. Great guitars for the money. They were kind enough to let me customize two guitars, so I did two semi-hollowbodies with different colors, pickups, electronics, and scale lengths. I still use the prototypes pretty often.

Hey Justin, could you compare your Matchless pack and this new Vox one, for chimy yet full edge of breakup sounds?
Sure thing. There are lots of differences between the two cabs that make their tones unique. When I have the same amp settings and switch between the two, I'd say the VX15 has more low end, less boxy midrange (but still has that character), and clearer top end. This cab turned out better than I had expected, and I expected that it would be great. I made a modification to the cabinet that opened it up immensely!
 
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