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WICKED WIKI 1: Optimizing Spillover

yek

Moderator
Moderator
Tips and tricks for the Axe-Fx II, based on information in the wiki.

All information is derived from the Axe-Fx II wiki.
And as such the source of the tip/trick can be anyone and credits belong to him/her.
Sometimes it may be useful for newbies, sometimes it's for more advanced users.

Let's get started!

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Wiki Tips: #1 Optimizing spillover

By enabling Spillover in the Global menu, and putting a Delay and/or Reverb block in the source and target presets, reverb and delay trails can "spill over" to the next preset.

You may have experienced the trailing reverb or delay becoming louder when switching presets. Reason: if you're using the Level parameter to dial in the desired effects level, the trails are affected by the difference in gain between the presets. So the trails of a delay in a clean preset will get boosted when switching to a heavy preset. Often this is not what you want.

There's a way around this. Bakerman posted about it.
  • Keep the Delay or Reverb after the Amp block (and after other blocks which impact gain).
  • Keep Mix and Level at fixed values. For example when placing the blocks in a parallel row: Mix 100%, Level 0.
  • Use Input Gain to get the desired delay or reverb level. Input Gain can vary per preset.
When applying this in the source and target presets, there'll be no significant level jumps anymore when switching presets.

Preset scene functionality (firmware 9.x) makes spillover much easier.

Wiki: Spillover (reverb/delay)

To get a list of all Wicked Wiki threads: type "Wicked Wiki" in the Search box.
 
Last edited:

Goldtop

Inspired
:eek:opsThanks for the reminder. I have a pop/spillover problem with my own Eruption patch and until I read this it didn't occur to me that running the tape delay before the amp block (as per Eddie's setup) would cause this on preset changes.... Doh!
 

redburst21

Experienced
Thanks a ton yek. U just solved my vol post when swapping from my main lead to main clean patch. Never realized I had raised the level in my delay block. Awesome stuff.... I know it's been said but thx a ton for your dedication bro. Much appreciated I'm sure by us all.
 
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yek

Moderator
Moderator
Spillover (the parameter in Global) applies to presets. Spillover in scenes is inherent to how scenes work. Scenes controllers are something different, unrelated to spillover.
 

Billbill

Power User
Then is there a way to stop a delay in scene 1, from spilling into scene 2 before I even start playing like does which screws me up as I start playing. It's the same delay block used in both scenes I just want it to cut out when I switch to scene 2, but remain on still in that second scene i switch to???
 

yek

Moderator
Moderator
See it like his: switching between scenes is the same as stomping a few pedals on a traditional pedalboard.

If you want to silence a delay in another scene, switch to that scene, bypass the Delay block and save the preset.

Whether you'll hear delay trails fading out, after switching to that scene, depends on the Delay block's Bypass mode.
With the Delay block in series: MUTE FX IN will let delay trails fade out, MUTE / MUTE FX OUT will kill all delay trails immediately.
 

mr_fender

Fractal Fanatic
For spillover when bypassing reverb/delay between scenes you need to mute the input of of the delay/reverb blocks and not the output to have spillover. If those blocks are in parallel, use Mute In bypass mode. If they are in series, use Mute FX In bypass mode. That will let the tails ring out as the block is bypassed instead of getting chopped off hard. Keep in mind that if you are using X/Y or scene controllers on delay or reverb between scenes, you can get dropouts and pitch glitches if you change modes or delay times. Also, if you are changing delay or reverb levels between scenes using scene controllers, you can use input gain instead of mix or level to allow the louder setting ring out more naturally instead of abruptly getting turned down by the controller.
 

Billbill

Power User
See it like his: switching between scenes is the same as stomping a few pedals on a traditional pedalboard.

If you want to silence a delay in another scene, switch to that scene, bypass the Delay block and save the preset.

Whether you'll hear delay trails fading out, after switching to that scene, depends on the Delay block's Bypass mode.
With the Delay block in series: MUTE FX IN will let delay trails fade out, MUTE / MUTE FX OUT will kill all delay trails immediately.
Awesome bro thanks!! Can't wait to try these settings tonight
 

Billbill

Power User
For spillover when bypassing reverb/delay between scenes you need to mute the input of of the delay/reverb blocks and not the output to have spillover. If those blocks are in parallel, use Mute In bypass mode. If they are in series, use Mute FX In bypass mode. That will let the tails ring out as the block is bypassed instead of getting chopped off hard. Keep in mind that if you are using X/Y or scene controllers on delay or reverb between scenes, you can get dropouts and pitch glitches if you change modes or delay times. Also, if you are changing delay or reverb levels between scenes using scene controllers, you can use input gain instead of mix or level to allow the louder setting ring out more naturally instead of abruptly getting turned down by the controller.
That's not what I'm trying to do though haha. Just want scene spillover to stop but still have that same delay block active in both scenes still.
 

mr_fender

Fractal Fanatic
Easiest way to do that is to use two delay blocks in parallel set to Mute Out bypass mode and alternate between them with scenes.

If it's a mono delay, you could also use the two sides of a Dual delay block as separate delays as well. Set both sides up the same, and use scene controllers to pan a Vol/Pan block feeding the delay block to choose one side or the other. Use the same scene controller to also turn down the delay level for the unused side to kill the tails.
 

Billbill

Power User
Easiest way to do that is to use two delay blocks in parallel set to Mute Out bypass mode and alternate between them with scenes.

If it's a mono delay, you could also use the two sides of a Dual delay block as separate delays as well. Set both sides up the same, and use scene controllers to pan a Vol/Pan block feeding the delay block to choose one side or the other. Use the same scene controller to also turn down the delay level for the unused side to kill the tails.
Thanks I'll give that a shot too!
 
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