• We would like to remind our members that this is a privately owned, run and supported forum. You are here at the invitation and discretion of the owners. As such, rules and standards of conduct will be applied that help keep this forum functioning as the owners desire. These include, but are not limited to, removing content and even access to the forum.

    Please give yourself a refresher on the forum rules you agreed to follow when you signed up.

Why are we chasing the amp in the room sound?

It would be a tragic day if the sound of being in a room with a M/V modded ‘72 SuperLead thru a full stack loaded with Pulsonics was deemed useless and disappeared from the face of the earth.

I completely realize the OP was just making an observation when he said he had never heard an inspired solo by his favorite guitarist coming directly from the cabs-
Likewise it was not attending a concert, but it was buying my first studio album that changed my life- specifically Diary Of A Madman when it came out.

But I did not fall in love with a guitar until I heard one being played thru an amplifier coming out of an open window in my neighborhood.
Studio recordings made me fall in love with music- but not with playing guitar.
It took the amp in the room sound for that to happen.

Most guitar legends must have came up with their most inspired and mind blowing riffs and licks while in a room with a guitar and amplifier.
The only other option would be to waste studio time by using the control room for extended riff writing sessions.
So clearly an amp in the room has inspired virtually every electric guitar masterpiece or at the very least was utilized to craft them.
Many could not do without that sound at this point due to their comfort zone.
They are still as legitimately essential as ever.
Can you envision Tony Iommi or Angus Young on stage without a Backline of stacks.
Never happen- they would refuse to play.

“The Song Remains The Same” concert album thru Hi-Fi speakers still sounds like real amps being played live even though the signal was processed through a recording console-
(Not necessarily amp in the room sounds but not worlds away from it either)
So the argument that real amps cannot translate their “realness” on any studio recordings anyway so why bother-
is pretty weak.

Although not nearly as sad as the “ My audience doesn’t care or know and cannot tell the difference anyway”.
(No shame whatsoever in using modelers live - they are amazing and are the most efficient rig under many circumstances.
It’s that attitude toward your audience that sucks).

When someone with a modeler eventually creates a live masterpiece from beginning to end like that one I will be very excited and impressed.
But until it does happen it will be my opinion that the visceral experience of the very best live recordings,
those magical 2 hours captured forever in time- need and deserve the very best untamed amplifiers, cabs and effects.

We all know that the first non-master volume Full Stack was designed as a backline for playing live at Wembely Stadium-
They are extremely directional because they were designed to project forward toward the back of the venue and to work efficiently when line-up side by side-
and half of the sound waves will inevitably hit the band in the legs.
But It would be a bad design if they did anything but.

Even throughout the era of the PA right up until today -
Full-stacks are still often enough the serious touring professionals weapon of choice on prominent stages of almost every size.
Venue owners and sound men seem to forget all about the no-stacks rule when every seat sells in advance.


A high quality full stack with broken in 25W speakers and a quality master volume can be played in a living room and sounds glorious at very reasonable volume levels.
Totally feasible/ desirable for on stage monitoring unless your gonna run around like a tool.
In-ears may appear to be a better solution for some until you factor that the consensus is beginning to point to them being somehow even worse on your ears then today’s average stage volume.

There’s no cure for tinnitus-
One good blast of accidental feedback from a careless soundman administered directly into your cochlear via in-ear monitors can be all it takes for a musicians worst nightmare to become a crushing reality.
Consistent stage monitoring thru in-ears will be useless once your career is over because you can no longer tolerate the electric guitar frequencies and volume that will surely just keep making the tinnitus even worse- so now your depressed, suicidal and you just want to die to stop the ringing and end the cruel joke.

And just because your audience will not experience the full sonic benefit of having an
A and B cab stacked- that should not stop you from being inspired by the fullest potential of your rig.
Even if you think the B cab is just flapping your trousers- without it most guitarist will notice the lack of lower frequency content.

Ok then-
everyone who’s idea of a “gig” or a good time is playing music that they don’t even like, with band members they secretly despise in front of people they have nothing in common with, for an amount of $ that does not even truly cover all of your time and expenses-
can now point out that I’m clueless because I don’t play for a paying audience.

A nice change would be “I don’t gig either- but your still clueless”.

Strange how the most successful musicians on this forum are kind, helpful, humble and all class all the time-
but the Fractal Fanatic in a cover copy-cat band will be the first to say “ Nope- no way- never gonna work in the heat of battle”.

God forbid you screw up the intro to Living On A Prayer because your Bon Jovi preset is too complicated for your tiny brain to handle while your busy flaunting your showmanship skills and sex appeal.

Yet David Gilmour was solely responsible for giving all the split-second musical cues to everyone involved in “The Wall” shows while playing guitar and singing at the same time.
But as they like to say around here-
Who cares, the audience doesn’t care and cant tell the difference anyway.


By the way-
Im here because I literally love my FM-3.
It allows me to do things with stereo effects and channel switching that I was never quite able to manage or accomplish any other way and it is
the best thing that has ever happened for making the most of my available playing time.
 
Last edited:

Feflicker

Inspired
It would be a tragic day if the sound of being in a room with a M/V modded ‘72 SuperLead thru a full stack loaded with Pulsonics was deemed useless and disappeared of the face of the earth.

I completely realize the OP was just making an observation when he said he had never heard an inspired solo by his favorite guitarist coming directly from the cabs-
Likewise it was a single studio recording that changed my life- specifically Diary Of A Madman when it came out.

But I did not fall in love with a guitar until I heard one being played thru an amplifier coming out of an open window in my neighborhood.
Studio recordings made me fall in love with music- but not with playing guitar.
It took the amp in the room sound for that to happen.

Most guitar legends came up with their most inspired and mind blowing riffs and licks while in a room with a guitar and amplifier.
The only other option would be to waste studio time by using the control room for extended riff writing sessions.
So clearly an amp in the room has inspired virtually every electric guitar masterpiece or at the very least was utilized to craft them.
Many could not do without at this point due to their comfort zone.
They are still as legitimately essential as ever.
Can you envision Tony Iommi or Angus Young on stage without a Backline of stacks.
Never happen- they wouldn’t go on.

“The Song Remains The Same” concert album thru Hi-Fi speakers still sounds like real amps being played live even though the signal went through a console-
(Not necessarily amp in the room sound but not worlds away from it either)
So the argument that real amps do not translate their “realness” on studio recordings anyway so why bother-
is pretty weak.

Although not nearly as sad as the “ My audience doesn’t care or know and cannot tell the difference anyway”.
(No shame in modelers-they are amazing and the right tool in many situations.
It’s that attitude that sucks).

When someone with a modeler creates a live masterpiece from beginning to end like that I will be very excited and impressed.
But until it does happen it will be my opinion that the visceral experience of the very best live recordings,
those magical 2 hours captured forever in time- need and deserve the very best untamed amplifiers, cabs and effects.

We all know that the first non-master volume Full Stack was designed as a backline for playing live at Wembely Stadium-
They are extremely directional because they were designed to work efficiently side by side-
and half of the sound waves will hit the band in the legs.
But It would be a bad design if they did anything but.

Even throughout the era of the PA right up until today -
Full-stacks are still often enough the serious touring professionals weapon of choice on prominent stages of almost every size.
Venue owners and sound men seem to forget all about the no-stacks rule when every seat sells in advance.


A high quality full stack with broken in 25W speakers and a quality master volume can be played in a living room and sound glorious at very reasonable volume levels.
Totally feasible/ desirable for on stage monitoring unless your gonna run around like a ...

Wow. That was something.

Personally, I fell in love with guitar playing a $100 beater into the mic input on my hitachi boom box, jamming over ...and justice for all. Had nothing to do with tone, or volume, or any of what you describe. It was about music and making a sound with the instrument, the challenge of it. 🤷‍♂️
 

stereotactic

Experienced
It would be a tragic day if the sound of being in a room with a M/V modded ‘72 SuperLead thru a full stack loaded with Pulsonics was deemed useless and disappeared from the face of the earth.

I completely realize the OP was just making an observation when he said he had never heard an inspired solo by his favorite guitarist coming directly from the cabs-
Likewise it was a single studio recording that changed my life- specifically Diary Of A Madman when it came out.

But I did not fall in love with a guitar until I heard one being played thru an amplifier coming out of an open window in my neighborhood.
Studio recordings made me fall in love with music- but not with playing guitar.
It took the amp in the room sound for that to happen.

Most guitar legends came up with their most inspired and mind blowing riffs and licks while in a room with a guitar and amplifier.
The only other option would be to waste studio time by using the control room for extended riff writing sessions.
So clearly an amp in the room has inspired virtually every electric guitar masterpiece or at the very least was utilized to craft them.
Many could not do without at this point due to their comfort zone.
They are still as legitimately essential as ever.
Can you envision Tony Iommi or Angus Young on stage without a Backline of stacks.
Never happen- they wouldn’t go on.

“The Song Remains The Same” concert album thru Hi-Fi speakers still sounds like real amps being played live even though the signal went through a console-
(Not necessarily amp in the room sound but not worlds away from it either)
So the argument that real amps do not translate their “realness” on studio recordings anyway so why bother-
is pretty weak.

Although not nearly as sad as the “ My audience doesn’t care or know and cannot tell the difference anyway”.
(No shame in modelers-they are amazing and the right tool in many situations.
It’s that attitude that sucks).

When someone with a modeler creates a live masterpiece from beginning to end like that I will be very excited and impressed.
But until it does happen it will be my opinion that the visceral experience of the very best live recordings,
those magical 2 hours captured forever in time- need and deserve the very best untamed amplifiers, cabs and effects.

We all know that the first non-master volume Full Stack was designed as a backline for playing live at Wembely Stadium-
They are extremely directional because they were designed to work efficiently side by side-
and half of the sound waves will hit the band in the legs.
But It would be a bad design if they did anything but.

Even throughout the era of the PA right up until today -
Full-stacks are still often enough the serious touring professionals weapon of choice on prominent stages of almost every size.
Venue owners and sound men seem to forget all about the no-stacks rule when every seat sells in advance.


A high quality full stack with broken in 25W speakers and a quality master volume can be played in a living room and sound glorious at very reasonable volume levels.
Totally feasible/ desirable for on stage monitoring unless your gonna run around like a joker.
Sure- in ears are a better solution for some until you factor that the consensus is beginning to point to them being somehow even worse on your ears then today’s average stage volume.

There’s no cure for tinnitus-
One good blast of accidental feedback administered directly to your cochlear via in-ear monitors can be all it takes for a musicians worst nightmare to become a crushing reality.
Consistent stage monitoring thru in-ears will be useless once your career is over because you can no longer tolerate the electric guitar frequencies and volume that will surely just keep making the tinnitus even worse- so now your depressed, suicidal and you just want to die to stop the ringing and end the cruel joke.

And just because your audience will not experience the full sonic benefit of having an
A and B cab stacked- that should not stop you from being inspired by the fullest potential of your rig.
Even if you think the B cab is just flapping your trousers- without it most guitarist will notice the lack of lower frequency content.

Ok then-
everyone who’s idea of a “gig” is playing music that they don’t even like, with band members they secretly despise in front of people they have nothing in common with, for an amount of $ that does not even truly cover all of your time and expenses-
can now point out that I’m clueless because I don’t play for a paying audience.

A nice change would be “I don’t gig either- but your still clueless”.

Strange how the most successful musicians on this forum are kind, helpful, humble and all class all the time-
but the Fractal Fanatic in a cover copy-cat band will be the first to say “ Nope- no way- never gonna work in the heat of battle”.

God forbid you screw up the intro to Living On A Prayer because your Bon Jovi preset is too complicated for your tiny brain.
Yet David Gilmour was responsible for giving all the split-second cues to everyone involved in “The Wall” shows while playing guitar and singing at the same time.
But as they like to say around here-
the audience doesn’t care and cant tell the difference anyway.


By the way-
Im here because I literally love my FM-3.
It allows me to do things with stereo effects and channel switching that I was never quite able to manage or accomplish any other way and it is
the best thing that has ever happened for making the most of my available playing time.

Amen, thank you for the detailed post. To prove your point and then some:


Deep Purple Highway Star 1972, no vocal wedges, no side fills I can see, fantastic performance by a bunch of very talented guys who took the requisite time to make something great....
 

yoitsmegabe

Inspired
Wow. That was something.

Personally, I fell in love with guitar playing a $100 beater into the mic input on my hitachi boom box, jamming over ...and justice for all. Had nothing to do with tone, or volume, or any of what you describe. It was about music and making a sound with the instrument, the challenge of it. 🤷‍♂️

Holy crap a boom box was my first amp too!. To get distortion I would just crank the volume and I swore I sounded just like Metallica. My first actual amp was a crate combo and I was like wow "Metallica at lower volume!"
 

DougB415

Inspired
Amen, thank you for the detailed post. To prove your point and then some:


Deep Purple Highway Star 1972, no vocal wedges, no side fills I can see, fantastic performance by a bunch of very talented guys who took the requisite time to make something great....
Isn’t that an Altec Lansing “Voice Of The Theatre” stack right behind Ian Gillian? Two of them, actually.
 
Last edited:

Ripley

Member
I enjoy the amp in the room sound, even at bedroom volumes I think a real guitar cab adds something, so it has nothing to do with SPL levels or trouser flapping air pressure.
An earlier comment in this thread stated that a mic'd cab will always have a 'comb filter effect' on the resultant sound, the word to note hear is 'filter' I.e. something is removed from the original sound source.
I've been to concerts of artists who are renowned for their tone, Joe Bonamassa, ACDC, where music is played over the PA before the artist comes on stage, there is always something extra to the live guitar sound with the addition of real guitar cabs, and some of the sound coming direct from those, as opposed to a recorded track being played through the PA.
If you want an explanation of what the aitr sound is all about from a world class artist, look up the 2018 Premier Guitar rig run down of Joe Bonamassa.
 

Parapsia

New Member
The whole argument seems moot. A live tone and one you want mixed for a radio ready song are going to sound different. The"amp room sound" is fine for live performance because everyone is used to hearing it, but it will probably not translate well to an actual studio mix because it is impossible to capture that same sound you are hearing. It's like hearing your own voice recorded... it's fucking weird if you're not used to it. Screw your perspective, and focus on what sounds good to the listener. Live sound is easy to compensate for, but its tough when trying to figure out a mix tone which I think this post is about. I don't like doing it, but reamping is key.

My own experience: your tones are drowned in a mix because your highs are drowned by the cymbals. I always feel like nothing has enough top-end.
 

seeu22

Member
I enjoy the amp in the room sound, even at bedroom volumes I think a real guitar cab adds something, so it has nothing to do with SPL levels or trouser flapping air pressure.
An earlier comment in this thread stated that a mic'd cab will always have a 'comb filter effect' on the resultant sound, the word to note hear is 'filter' I.e. something is removed from the original sound source.
I've been to concerts of artists who are renowned for their tone, Joe Bonamassa, ACDC, where music is played over the PA before the artist comes on stage, there is always something extra to the live guitar sound with the addition of real guitar cabs, and some of the sound coming direct from those, as opposed to a recorded track being played through the PA.
If you want an explanation of what the aitr sound is all about from a world class artist, look up the 2018 Premier Guitar rig run down of Joe Bonamassa.

I'm betting what you are hearing here is the extra SPL's and FM curve in effect. The headliner is always louder than the run up music. On top of that most guitar centric artists tend to mix the guitar louder live than they do in the studio. To be honest I haven't heard a real great live rock tone in a while and that includes some well know players. The best live tone I've heard lately has been on the country side and that was Keith Urban and more recently Brad Paisley. Both had monster tone. I can tell you from where I was sitting for Keith Urban 100% of what I heard was from the PA.
 

stereotactic

Experienced
Isn’t that an Altec Lansing “Voice Of The Theatre” stack right behind Ian Gillian? Two of them, actually.
If we are referring to the same cabinets, I’m not sure those are Altecs, they have Marshall style cloth grills, radial horns and what looks like a Marshall logo. I could not identify them after a lot of interweb searching. I assumed they were part of Jon Lord’s amplification since he had an unconventional setup. If they were being used as monitors, what instrument would they be monitoring? They would likely be unusable for vocals as they would feed back at moderate volume with Ian Gillan standing so close in front of them.
 

austinbuddy

Fractal Fanatic
Vendor
Such a great topic and I am truly late to the party. I read the OP and a few pages but not all above the above (hope to soon).

IMHO, we all grew up loving recorded tones from records. A lot of us didn't realize when we started out how much of that great sound coming out of our speakers wasn't simply the player, their guitar plus the amp/cab (and maybe pedals!!! hahaha), but also was the mic used, placed where, possibly blends of various mics (including room mics), the console or outboard preamp used and any EQ applied, the studio compressor/limiter that can add punch to it, and of course effects. Some of us began to notice our guitar heroes live, while sounding great, didn't always sound like their tones on their albums....hahaha.

So we chase that, and replicating those tones we feel in love with. And it's FUN. And REWARDING when you "nail it." And what used to take a fortune to recreate can now all be done on an Axe-Fx III. When I made the original Naked Amps TonePack, I was aiming for studio recorded tones, not amp in a room tones.

BUT there is another thrill to be had.

The thrill of a cranked-up amp that interacts with the air and the guitar pickups on a room or on stage (I like my real Bogner Ecstasy 101b very much thank you, or my Bludotone Ojai). Because unlike the above, getting those amp in a room sounds can spur your playing to interact with the amp, coaxing feedback out of it, sustaining notes, all kinds of filthy goodness.

Even more fun for those that professionally do this for living (and I admire and respect those that do) is the thrill of the amp in back of you pushing air AND a PA floor monitor pushing your mic'd sound at your face simultaneously too.

There is a certain magic that can happen and inspire your playing when you've got a great sound coming at you from two directions that you can control.

When I want to let loose in my studio, I'll put on a jam track through my CLRs and mix my Axe-Fx III preset signal into it, but then also run the same preset signal into my Mission Gemini II. I was doing this to a new LiveGold Archon preset last weekend, to a cool David Grissom True Fire Rhythm track (Squank) and then using a Soldano preset to play along with Comfortably Numb. You just get inspired and in the moment when the amp in a room thing is going on.

"There's a feeling I get...."

So BOTH are valid.

The more futuristic question is, when are more people gonna use this amazing Axe-Fx III tool to create totally new unheard guitar-based (or other instrument!) sounds? Because it really can do about anything. I now think of the Axe-Fx III more as a total audio processor (Swiss army knife tool) -- if you get deep into it, you can really do amazing things. I still marvel at some of @Admin_M@ 's factory presets that are unlike anything I've ever heard.

We had Jimi, we had Eddie, someday somebody is gonna use this tool and be the next "Big Thang" with a cool and fresh new sound(s). At least, the potential is truly there for that.

Carry on!
 
Last edited:

seeu22

Member
Just a follow up to what Austin Buddy has said........ In my studio/jam room I've got a set of studio monitors for recording. On the opposite wall I have a set of QSC HPR112i mounted near the ceiling angled slightly down. I've got a Soundcraft Ui16 running those speakers. It's a great little rehearsal rig for when the band comes over.

I will often route the Axe III through the QSC's, put some backing tracks on the studio monitors and jam along. Of course I crank it quite loud, but the sound/tone is incredible. It is some of the best amp in the room tones I have ever had. I have a Egnater Mod 50 with several modules, a Bogner Shiva, Xtc 101b, an Atma, a Dr. Z Maz18 and various cabs. Every one of those amps sound incredible on their own, but honestly, the Axe III can easily hang with all of them. The nice thing about the Fractal is the sound is same everywhere in the room.

We are so fortunate to have all these amazing tools for live use and recording. With my Axe II, I felt that it recorded great, but the live stage/AITR tones weren't quite there yet. I got the Axe III and I haven't been able to stop smiling since.
 

MisterE

Fractal Fanatic
I think we'll never be able to get any modeler to sound like an amp in the room.
It that's not only because of the modeler.
AITR:
Amp->Cab->Ears
Modeler:
Amp->IR->FRFR->Ears

The IR is a filter - it only captures part of the sound of a speaker and is filtered through the microphone
Even the FRFR is a filter since none of them are really flat.

And there's another thing, especially with a 4x12" Cab.

a 1x12 gives the “purest” speaker tone and offers the best chance of hearing the speaker as close as possible to how the design engineer originally intended.
However, put four of them into a 4x12 and that shifts the tonal balance considerably. At the lowest frequencies, the speakers couple and behave almost as if they are one single, very large speaker. You’ll find there’s considerably more output in the midrange and low end, from around 500 Hz down.
It's my guess, this is what a lot of guitar players are looking for.

But an IR can not really capture the sound of a 4x12" - it's always combination of one speaker in the cab with one or more mikes pointed a a certain part of the speaker.

I'm happy with what I hear from my CLR's on stage and my Equator D8's at home. And what matters to me, is that what I hear through my CLR's resembles closely what comes out of the PA.
 

Purplestrats

Inspired
Digital modeling has made it so much easier and practical to get great guitar sounds for live performance or recording. I absolutely love it! If I’m just playing for myself though, nothing beats having a great amp and effects right there in front of me. (Two amps and a stereo delay if I have my way). Playing through monitors just isn’t the same experience, no matter how high-end-top-quality the monitors are.
 
The whole argument seems moot. A live tone and one you want mixed for a radio ready song are going to sound different. The"amp room sound" is fine for live performance because everyone is used to hearing it, but it will probably not translate well to an actual studio mix because it is impossible to capture that same sound you are hearing. It's like hearing your own voice recorded... it's fucking weird if you're not used to it. Screw your perspective, and focus on what sounds good to the listener. Live sound is easy to compensate for, but its tough when trying to figure out a mix tone which I think this post is about. I don't like doing it, but reamping is key.

My own experience: your tones are drowned in a mix because your highs are drowned by the cymbals. I always feel like nothing has enough top-end.
I went way off topic in rant mode and may be responsible for the derailment.

It was not an argument to begin with- the OP was clear about that.
But then again his post title was a bit provocative- so who knows.
He could be kicking back with a bowl of popcorn.

I think he was curious as to why a digital developer would continue to attempt to match what we hear coming directly out of an amp/cabinet when we are standing in front of it-
when many are just going to take that sound and process it for studio recordings or run it through FOH.

Those not using modelers or in-ears are still using an amp/cab on stage for personal monitoring of their own performance.
The primary reason they are not using those methods is often because they feel something is lost-
and their performance suffers because of it.

One interesting perspective implied that if traditional rigs never existed and we only ever had digital guitar sounds
and then amps came along-
then the amp in the room sound would be the one that seemed un-exciting and un-inspiring in comparison.

I’m trying not to imagine what would be lost if there was auto-tune, unlimited channel tapeless recording and internet collaboration right out of the gate-
and little motivation to have flawless technique or to play together before recording a full CD of songs.
 
Last edited:

DougB415

Inspired
If we are referring to the same cabinets, I’m not sure those are Altecs, they have Marshall style cloth grills, radial horns and what looks like a Marshall logo. I could not identify them after a lot of interweb searching. I assumed they were part of Jon Lord’s amplification since he had an unconventional setup. If they were being used as monitors, what instrument would they be monitoring? They would likely be unusable for vocals as they would feed back at moderate volume with Ian Gillan standing so close in front of them.
Yes, they would feedback if they were turned up loud, but maybe they were just loud enough to hear the vocals? The band has to be able to hear the singer; heck even the singer has to hear the singer! There might have been side fills that aren't in the shot. When I saw DP in '73 Blackmore had 4 Marshall stacks, Glover and Lord each had 2 stacks. There were no horn cabs on stage. Supposedly they were touring with the Stones PA system and it was LOUD.
 
Yes, they would feedback if they were turned up loud, but maybe they were just loud enough to hear the vocals? The band has to be able to hear the singer; heck even the singer has to hear the singer! There might have been side fills that aren't in the shot. When I saw DP in '73 Blackmore had 4 Marshall stacks, Glover and Lord each had 2 stacks. There were no horn cabs on stage. Supposedly they were touring with the Stones PA system and it was LOUD.

I have heard a few guitarists say they don’t have the singer in their in-ear mix.
In Petrucci’s case- I can understand that.
DP in ‘73 - that has to be a bench mark.
Can you think of anything since then that you have seen live that was as impressive.
I think it’s relative to the thread.
 
Last edited:

stereotactic

Experienced
Yes, they would feedback if they were turned up loud, but maybe they were just loud enough to hear the vocals? The band has to be able to hear the singer; heck even the singer has to hear the singer! There might have been side fills that aren't in the shot. When I saw DP in '73 Blackmore had 4 Marshall stacks, Glover and Lord each had 2 stacks. There were no horn cabs on stage. Supposedly they were touring with the Stones PA system and it was LOUD.
I guess it’s possible they were being used as vocal monitors or that there were side fills out of the shot, but there’s obviously a lot stage volume and any vocal monitors would have to be loud even to be heard at all. Judging by the fact Gillan isn’t moving very far from his one spot, he may be positioned right behind the PA and is hearing himself only through it.

Whatever the case at this show, my main point is that these guys performed really well with just their stage sound and had very little if any monitoring. Your average performer today would be unable to do the same, as so many have come to rely on IEM’s with their own personal mixers, we have lots of drummers playing to click tracks, we have bands using prerecorded tracks which then have to be integrated into the stage sound and FOH. All of which takes a live performance and makes it more like a studio session and less like an actual event happening in that unique space and time.

I will continue to try and have the best of both worlds, to maximize the Axe’s amazing capabilities and also try to find a way to recreate the kind of stage experience I had with my big analog rig. I need to find a place to audition those MJF-212As...
 
Top Bottom