• We would like to remind our members that this is a privately owned, run and supported forum. You are here at the invitation and discretion of the owners. As such, rules and standards of conduct will be applied that help keep this forum functioning as the owners desire. These include, but are not limited to, removing content and even access to the forum.

    Please give yourself a refresher on the forum rules you agreed to follow when you signed up.

What adjustments can I make to...

rickbarclay

Inspired
...get equal volume across all strings?
Hello, guys and gals. I have a problem on some presets where high e and b strings will sound weak when plucked, and especially when bent,
but the other four strings will blast the neighbors out of their armchairs. Sometimes I can fix this simply by
changing to a different amp, but I'm not at all satisfied with this approach, because I don't like scrolling through
amps like that. I can also get some relief using a compressor, reverb, and delay blocks, but I still can't get the high e and b response I'm
looking for. I'm using 9.5 stings, upgrading to 10's soon.

Soooo, is their any amp (or other) block adjustment available that will increase volume and sustain on the high e
and b strings without likewise increasing the output on the other four. Thanks for any suggestions.
 
Last edited:

Sixstring

Axe-Master
Does your pickups have screw over the pole pieces? if so it sounds like they might need to be adjusted.
 

rickbarclay

Inspired
As far as I know, they're stock '77 strat pickups, one phillips head screw on either side of each pickup. I think the problem is more the complexity of the Axe and my naivete and forgetfulness.
One thing I found this evening is that I've got the guitar volume set too low. When I jacked it up to ten, all the distortion finally made itself known, and there was no problem with low volume on the
high strings; rather, the problem is how to tame it while keeping the effects relevant. We all know this thing isn't learned in a day, and I've had mine for ten months now and I still don't know what I'm doing, except
experimenting and playing around. I know more now than I knew after a month, but not much. lol Thanks for you interest, Sixstring. I'll keep plugging along. I need to remember things like setting
the guitar's volume right. I found out several months ago from tweaking around and reading bits here that I should play with the volume up high but things tend to get away from me after a while, and
I need to be reminded every now and then. Ciao.
 

JJunkie

Forum Addict
Nothing you do will be perfect.

Multiband compressor?

or

Maybe you can use a crossover block, set the separation frequency appropriately and treat the high frequencies with different compression or just increase its level

EDIT. Mind you, I would try to make the adjustment to the pickup polepieces first. If that's not possible then I would do the above BEFORE the amp block.
 

Sixstring

Axe-Master
Your right it doesn't happen over night just keep working with it, it will happen. Plenty of people running single coils with the Axe and getting great results but I know what you mean with string volumes it does tend to be a little more noticeable with singles. Try messing with the Input trim on amps that are finicky with how much they need then EQ to taste.
 

rickbarclay

Inspired
I'm pretty sure the pickups are good the way they are, JJ. The guitar was setup for me before it was shipped, and it's been checked out down here, too, when I had the nut replaced. I just need
to get better acquainted with the hows and whys of the Axe and my axe. Thanks for your interest.
 

mr_fender

Fractal Fanatic
If you clearly notice a difference in string to string response, it's most likely a pickup issue and not the Axe. Cranking things up in the Axe may help, but only because you are likely getting more compression from the amp model which evens out the difference. Do your Strat pickups have staggered pole pieces? Vintage style staggered strat pickups almost always have the g string pole the highest. This is because back in those days, guitars usually had a wound g string with a tiny inner core. However, modern players almost always use a larger plain g string, so that tall g pole piece often makes the g string way louder than the rest. People try to compensate by lowering the treble side of the pickup, which helps even out the g, but it also makes your b and e strings way too thin and quiet then. I like things to be "vintage correct" but the tall g pole is usually just irritating.
 
Last edited:

rickbarclay

Inspired
Hello, Mr. Fender. I just did a visual on the pickups. The poles pieces for all three pickups are slightly staggered with the bass strings higher than the trebles. However, it seems the
treble sides of both the neck and bridge pickups have been raised to level things out. The middle pickup is level. Actually, all the poles appear to be level and about 1/2 inch below
their respective strings; i.e, no appreciable difference in height to these eyes.

The difference in string response is only evident when the guitar's volume knob is set to around five. When maxed out at ten, the trebles seem to be ok, but I really haven't experimented
enough with the volume maxed to make a judgement one way or another. It's pretty hard on the ears, and I can only max out when the house is empty. I have several ways to raise and
lower the volume coming out of the speakers, and that's what I intend to play around with to see what I come up with regarding string and effect response.

If you have any suggestions, I'd be happy to hear them. I'm particularly interested in knowing how to adjust individual pole pieces or raising the pickups on my strat. I've never done that and
don't think it's a good idea to try something I know nothing about. Thanks for your info.

Whoops. Just googled strat pole adjustment. Many hits.
 

luke

Fractal Fanatic
The pickup pole pieces can be pressed from the rear to raise them up, however, if you press too hard they will pop out and then the pickup has to be rewound usually. Such an operation should be done by someone qualified, like a luthier.
 

mr_fender

Fractal Fanatic
View attachment 23882

Here's a picture of what I'm talking about. Left side is bass side, right is treble. Notice how tall the g pole is compared to the b pole. In modern string sets, the g is larger in diameter than the b, so it's way louder. These 50's style pickups were designed with a wound g and 7.5" radius fretboard in mind. They don't exactly match up to modern strings and flatter fretboards. It's usually not a deal breaker, but more of an irritation. Some pickup makers do fortunately offer different staggers to combat this issue.
 
Top Bottom