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bleujazz3

Inspired
Indeed. We also know there are lot of shortages of components.
From my understanding, the Axe FX III uses Texas Instruments chips, but the FM9 and FM3 uses "Analog Devices" chips. The reason for this is becasue the TI chip is more powerful and produces more heat, which requires more cooling than the Analog Devices chips.

Someone will need to research the Analog Devices chips (where they're produced) to help determine whether the "global chip shortage" affects importing foreign-made chips, or ones produced in the U.S.

If indeed Analog Devices chips are produced in the U.S., it's less likely that the global shortage has a wider range effect on FM9 production, realizing that Analog Devices chips may be produced on U.S. soil which might help ease the shortage of "global demand."

Of course, this is mostly "what-if" and guesswork, but it stands to reason that domestic components might be more accessible than foreign-made ones.

(Source: Wiki FM9)
 
Last edited:

Greg Ferguson

Fractal Fanatic
From my understanding, the Axe FX III uses Texas Instruments chips, but the FM9 and FM3 uses "Analog Devices" chips. The reason for this is becasue the TI chip is more powerful and produces more heat, which requires more cooling than the Analog Devices chips.

Someone will need to research the Analog Devices chips (where they're produced) to help determine whether the "global chip shortage" affects importing foreign-made chips, or ones produced in the U.S.

If indeed Analog Devices chips are produced in the U.S., it's less likely that the global shortage has a wider range effect on FM9 production, realizing that Analog Devices chips may be produced on U.S. soil which might help ease the shortage of "global demand."

Of course, this is mostly "what-if" and guesswork, but it stands to reason that domestic components might be more accessible than foreign-made ones.

(Source: Wiki FM9)
Analog Devices' chips are made in the U.S. and Ireland, and are tested in the Philippines. TI has factories around the world.

Getting all the various parts to the board assembly site is part of the equation. The main DSP and CPU are a few of many ICs and other components that need to be stuffed into the motherboard, then the boards are shipped to the U.S. and installed into the case where it's connected, tested, updated, packed and shipped.

The chip foundries are able to turn out lots of chips because they're largely automated, but they have to get their raw materials to do so, and then the finished and Q/A'd chips have to ship to whoever builds the board, who Q/A's it, and ships it again... all those raw materials and intermediate shipping steps involve lots of humans and that's where the virus is causing impact. In addition, FAS is a small company, so if one person is out they'll feel it in the other steps of final assembly and getting it to the customer.

Saying "...domestic components might be more accessible"... "might" is a strong conditional. IF someone makes the chips domestically, yes, might. A lot of the foundries moved out of the country for a variety of reasons.
 

bleujazz3

Inspired
Analog Devices' chips are made in the U.S. and Ireland, and are tested in the Philippines. TI has factories around the world.

Getting all the various parts to the board assembly site is part of the equation. The main DSP and CPU are a few of many ICs and other components that need to be stuffed into the motherboard, then the boards are shipped to the U.S. and installed into the case where it's connected, tested, updated, packed and shipped.

The chip foundries are able to turn out lots of chips because they're largely automated, but they have to get their raw materials to do so, and then the finished and Q/A'd chips have to ship to whoever builds the board, who Q/A's it, and ships it again... all those raw materials and intermediate shipping steps involve lots of humans and that's where the virus is causing impact. In addition, FAS is a small company, so if one person is out they'll feel it in the other steps of final assembly and getting it to the customer.

Saying "...domestic components might be more accessible"... "might" is a strong conditional. IF someone makes the chips domestically, yes. A lot of the foundries moved out of the country for a variety of reasons.
Thanks, Greg!

In one video about the chip shortage, it was noted that it takes about 3 days to produce one chip, not to mention combining chips into larger cores.

The strong conditional was made because it doesn't include infinitives, like "will always" or "never." The conditional was meant to include possibility, but not exclude other reasons why shortages might occur because of imported chips.

Do you think that if Analog Devices are a U.S. business, we might stand a better chance of better domestic production times?
 

CrosleyPop

New Member
My alternate came in today, and I'm ecstatic!
If you sold your FM3 and dont want to wait anymore do what I didView attachment 88467
That's what I did as well. I threw my hat in the FM9 ring a couple days after the announcement, but after some thinking, I decided to just go for broke and get the big boy. Just got the shipment notification this morning.

I still have my FM3, but once the III is in the rack and verified, the FM3 goes up for sale. I wish I could cede my spot on the waitlist to someone else ;)
 
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