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Tue Madsen mixing Meshuggah's guitars

Alex C

Inspired
Very neat look into the mixing process behind the new album.



I especially liked watching the process of boosting a narrow frequency spike and sweeping that around to find particularly offensive frequencies, then dropping those by several dB. The original EQ initially sounded fine to me, but after the bad stuff is identified it becomes very apparent in the original. In the subsequent full-mix comparisons with this EQ on and bypassed the difference is dramatic.
 

BBN

Fractal Fanatic
I especially liked watching the process of boosting a narrow frequency spike and sweeping that around to find particularly offensive frequencies, then dropping those by several dB.
This is a common practice taught in engineering classes.
The way I was taught, was to perform this process, the compress, then Eq to get the tone you want.
So requires 2 Eq plugins per channel, but it works great.
Excellent tip.
 

Alex C

Inspired
I had read that tip here on the forum and tried a crude version of it with EQ blocks in the Axe, but I'm new to the production side of things and still learning what works in a mix, so to see it demonstrated in a real mix with music I'm familiar with was really interesting. Also, hearing some of the resonant whistling and other sounds that were "hidden" among the upper frequencies was eye-opening and almost startling.

It's always rewarding to watch a pro at work, too.
 
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