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Trillion-frames-per-second camera takes photos of light moving

spagthorpe

Experienced
Very mind boggling too when you think how fast light travels.

And yet so slow over huge distances. That even if we could travel as fast, we'd be 35 years away from a potential system like ours. Others are hundreds of thousands of years away, and that's the close stuff.
 

2204JCM

Inspired
The way they do it is kinda cheating as they have to take photos over and over of the same thing and then put them together in order.
So they can only do it with something that behaves the exact same way each time.
 

davidevo

Inspired
Very awesome, the laser gyros on modern aircraft, and in the aerospace industry work on the same principle. Laser gyros have been around for quite a while. I’m a retired Delta Airlines Aircraft Mechanic, and we were the launch customer for the Boeing 767, which had the new “Glass Cockpit” with integration avionics, CRT monitor screens (today’s screens are LCD.) It has Laser gyros. Interesting fact: the cockpit layout for the 767 and 757 were almost identical, which made it easy for pilots to transition between aircraft. I’m a Boeing guy, and one of my favorite airplanes is the 757. I also like the 727, and 737. 😀🛫🎸🇺🇸
 

unix-guy

Legend!
The way they do it is kinda cheating as they have to take photos over and over of the same thing and then put them together in order.
So they can only do it with something that behaves the exact same way each time.
Isn't that basically what videos are? It's just a sequence of individual frames strung together...
 
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