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The learning process & how do you achieve Unity gain for each presets

jandjrs

Inspired
I learned of the FX 2 within the past month and I am so impressed with what I have read and heard that I am on the waiting list. I know there is quite a bit of a learning curve and I'm trying to streamline this process. I have been reading the forums, the wiki page and it is a bit overwhelming.

Questions:
What is the best way to streamline this learning process?
Are there any "good" tutorials out there in one location?

How do I achieve unity gain between the presets or between the presets I create? Or, is it done the "old fashion way" where the presets must be created at stage volume and then tweaked?
Are the factory presets at unity gain?

I appreciate any input as I don't want to re-invent the wheel.
 

Admin M@

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
It is important to have clear ideas about what you want to accomplish, and don't try to do it all in one bite.

As with any system, you can only achieve consistent levels across presets by listening. You generally need to tweak this at stage volume, but the Axe-Fx has remote functions which allow you to do so.
 

Lukator

Inspired
I'm dialing my tones for live gigs first with a Focusrite Saffire Pro 24 DSP and Yamaha HS80M Monitors. It's not very easy to get a unity gain between the patches.

First I have a look at the input gain lights on the Focusrite, that's a gross policity, than I use my ears and try it later over my stage set. In most cases is it's okay, but the cleans are difficult and anytime I have to readjust it al little bit.

Another issue is, for almost every patch I've programmed a "solo" switch in my MFC, that controls a filter block and any other effects like delay or so. The filter block works as a volume boost and drive the level up for 1 - 3 db, depending on the tone type. Here I have a look at the level meters of the audio interface (here my Focusrite) to protect the input of the mixer against too strong signals. And everytime using my ears.

Sorry for possibly not correct terms sometimes, it's not my native language.
 

CodePoet

Power User
Admin M@ said:
You generally need to tweak this at stage volume, but the Axe-Fx has remote functions which allow you to do so.

What are the "remote functions" that allow you to do this?
 

clarky

Axe-Master
It is important to have clear ideas about what you want to accomplish, and don't try to do it all in one bite.

+1 brazillion...

before I start creating tones I try to make meaningful notes about the tone itself and any extras I need in there [like FX that I want to control or be able to punch in / out on the fly]

then I draw a lil' diagram of the components I need and note what their function is and if any controllers are needed...
start small and build the core of the tone first... nail that before adding all the extra bells and whistles...
try to keep a clear vision of what it is you are trying to achieve..

thinking it all through speeds up the creation process and makes things a little less trial and error..

that said, occasionally I'll pick a few FX and just noodle with them for the sake of experimentation
 

clarky

Axe-Master
Questions:
How do I achieve unity gain between the presets or between the presets I create? Or, is it done the "old fashion way" where the presets must be created at stage volume and then tweaked?
Are the factory presets at unity gain?

I appreciate any input as I don't want to re-invent the wheel.

before you read my answers, note that I do not use the 4-wire method, I use a stereo power amp

I start with my soloing tone.. I make as loud as possible but being mindful not to compromise the tone leaving the fx unit / entering the power amp..

I set up my riff / clean tones and set their levels in relation to the solo tone as best I can
then when I rehearse with the band I make the required level adjustments to nail the relative levels...
this part is not easy and takes time to get dead right

I have a bank of patches for home / studio use and a copy of these patches in the next bank that have been tweaked [usually tamed a little] for live / high volume use
 

barhrecords

Axe-Master
I use(d, former Ultra user waiting in line for a II,) my acoustic guitar lead patch as the level reference and built everything around that level.

I made the most progress when I started all my patches from scratch.

Even if I found a factory preset I liked or heard a preset from the forum I liked, I would start from scratch and add in the blocks, amp and cab first, then efx. etc. vs. starting with the preset and tweaking it.

It may be non-intuitive but it was easier for me to build up to a similiar preset to match my others than "tearing down" an existing preset. I spent too much time undoing compression, block levels etc.

Richard
 
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