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SLO-100 models on AxeFX and AmpliTube.

Detch

Inspired
This is SLO-100 model from AxeFX II FW 14.2 and SLO-100 from AmpliTube 3.12

I did this comparison just for fun, not to prove anything. Off curse i like Axe's model, it's much much better. There is no point in proving it. I got quite similar results on the record (re-amping) but overall feeling while dialing knobs is different.
They behave in a very different way. Specially "presence" on Amplitube model it adds a lot of high end, I can compare it withrising high shelf on the EQ, While Axe's presence does some "magic" :)
i can't describe it.

I was about to make it a "guess who is who" thread but there is no point in that :)

I used the same IR
I also added Tube Screamer emulations in Axe and AmpliTube.

First i dialed the tone on Axe FX and then tried to reach it on AmpliTube

This is Hi Gain shit, so there is not much difference, it would be much more interesting to compare JCM800's, for example, if someone except me is interested in "having such fun" i'll post results here :)

So here is the order
AXE:hororr:-AmpliTube-AXE:triumphant:-AmpliTube


Cheers.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
They sound pretty similar. The presence control on most modelers is usually just a high-shelf. The Axe-Fx II presence operates just like a real amp and modifies the virtual power amp feedback. This actually does create a sort of "magic" since it changes the shape of the distortion vs. frequency. That's the advantage to the nonlinear feedback network that the Axe-Fx uses. Negative feedback makes the distortion transfer function "harder". The presence control reduces negative feedback at high frequencies. This increases the treble but also softens the transfer function so you get more highs but the softer distortion reduces the amount of harsh overtones.
 

Detch

Inspired
They sound pretty similar. The presence control on most modelers is usually just a high-shelf. The Axe-Fx II presence operates just like a real amp and modifies the virtual power amp feedback. This actually does create a sort of "magic" since it changes the shape of the distortion vs. frequency. That's the advantage to the nonlinear feedback network that the Axe-Fx uses. Negative feedback makes the distortion transfer function "harder". The presence control reduces negative feedback at high frequencies. This increases the treble but also softens the transfer function so you get more highs but the softer distortion reduces the amount of harsh overtones.
It's amazing to hear and feel how this theory works on practice!!! Thank you for clarification, Cliff!

:tranquillity:
 
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