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Saturation Switch changes tone

BornIntoAttitude

New Member
According to the manual, "The 'ON (AUTH)' and 'ON (IDEAL)' settings differ only in volume." but I've noticed that there's a significant change in tone between the two. I'm using the Brit 800 Mod and the "ON (IDEAL)" seemingly has a mid boost and the "ON" setting seemingly scoops the mids. Even when I equalize the level between the ON and ON (Ideal) settings they still sound different. This happens on other amp as well. Anyone else experience this? Thoughts?
 

Rex

Legend!
are you sure they were exactly equal? difference in volume can exactly account for the "scooped" sound.
Especially if you’re not playing loud enough to completely swamp the sound of your strings.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
According to the manual, "The 'ON (AUTH)' and 'ON (IDEAL)' settings differ only in volume." but I've noticed that there's a significant change in tone between the two. I'm using the Brit 800 Mod and the "ON (IDEAL)" seemingly has a mid boost and the "ON" setting seemingly scoops the mids. Even when I equalize the level between the ON and ON (Ideal) settings they still sound different. This happens on other amp as well. Anyone else experience this? Thoughts?
The manual is incorrect. The ideal setting will push the power amp harder which WILL change the tone.
 

IronSean

Inspired
The manual is incorrect. The ideal setting will push the power amp harder which WILL change the tone.
It makes a lot of sense if you think about it. The saturation switch is happening in the middle of the preamp circuit. As it works by default, it actually lowers the sound hitting the next stage by clipping the signal. In Ideal mode, it then boosts the volume back up, which means that increased level hits the next stage. They do differ "only in volume", but it's only in volume in the middle of the amp circuit where more volume (gain) can push later stages harder.
 
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