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Same patches, different guitars?

Akstrat

Inspired
Just wondering how guys are balancing out there patches using different guitars? I use only about 3-4 presets for shows. When switching between my Nocaster and CS LP, I now am manually turning down the output for my LP. I am thinking of having three more patches each for a different guitar. Or maybe just put a Null Filter in to compensate for the different outputs? Maybe there are other ideas? Sometimes I change guitars mid song. Thanks for the ideas!
 

richb

Inspired
This is always a challenge. I use a Strat, (2 patches) a Tele with P90's, (one Patch) and a Taylor T5 (one patch) for acoustic songs. Each guitar has it's own patches. Here's what I do. First, It's CRITICAL you do this exercise at performance volume. I take the guitar I use the most (Stat) and set that at a functional volume, including the solo boost volume. That means I ensure I'm not clipping (on the AX8 or my mixing board) in any way, when I use my Strat on Strat Patch Dirty. Then I look at the VU meter and take note of the level on the AX8. Then I do the same thing for my other guitars and patches, getting them as close as possible to Strat Patch Dirty. Always checking the VU meeter and my board. At this point, all guitars and patches are in the 'ballpark". When the band gets together, I have my AX8 hooked up to my laptop and while we play songs, I tweek the patches. I listen to the mix via the mains, NOT monitors. At this point I just want to be sure that my guitars and patches work for what the audience will here. From there, I'll focus on my monitor, etc. Hope this helps. Also, search the forum, there are great posts (Austin Buddy) on this topic. Look in Tips and Tricks.
 
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Ericbr1

Inspired
To me, you answered your own questions. If the null filter does the trick, and you have room for it, there you go. If you didn’t have room for it? Or don’t like using X/Y then externaal foot switch can be used. Otherwise make two or three sets of presets just like you said! I find many guys on these forums are way more anal than others, or play way different volumes than each other or way different styles, so it’s best to find what works best for us! :). Eric
 

Cam Heiliger

Regular
I have groups of presets for each of my 4 main performance guitars (2 Teles, a Jazzmaster, and a LP). It ensures consistent volume, plus each guitar responds better to different amps and drives. You can customize your foot switches to making switching between groups a breeze.
 

Geezerjohn

Fractal Fanatic
I use 2 banks, one set up for single coil and one set up for humbuckers. Same presets in each bank, but just a bit of different eq to sweeten them up a bit. I'm working toward just a single bank, but I don't know if I'll get there.
 

Smittefar

Fractal Fanatic
I use two guitars with very similar outputs (so similar, my friends say they can hear no difference between them), so I don't really have this problem anymore.

I used to play a strat and a Les Paul Std and they have very different outputs. In my tube amp days, I would embrace their differences rather than try to equalize them. Yes my Les Paul sounded very different than my strat with the same settings, but to me that was the whole point of switching guitars in the first place.

I tried the booster/EQ thing to even out the differences, but I never got it to work to my satisfaction.

I should 'soon' receive a custom strat, and I expect it to have much lower output than my PRSs. I think, I will try my old approach first - embrace the differences, and if that doesn't work for me, I will just build specific presets for each guitar.
 

GiRa

Forum Addict
I do agree, if someone has different guitars in the same tuning, it means they are looking for a different sound. Right?
 

Akstrat

Inspired
I'm going to go with different patches for each guitar. Been playing with different options, but to dial things in, I'm thinking best to start with whole new patch??
 

thegrizman

Inspired
I write either "Tele" or " Strat" at the end of the preset name....use an a/b switch and put AX8 in sticky mode to compare the levels against each guitar.

MY Tele has a Humbucker in neck position.
 
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Pete1959

Inspired
I always set up patches based on pickup type depending of course if the same patch sounds great with both.

Patches are self explanatory with "Hum" added, and left blank for my Strats.
 

Cam Heiliger

Regular
Are you saying you have different patches for each of your guitars?
I will build presets for my single coil guitars off of existing presets that I tweak based on the exact guitar. For example, I have a standard tele with a Duncan Little 59 in the bridge and a Nashville Tele with a Duncan Alnico II in the bridge and a strat pickup in the middle position. They have a lot of similar sounds, but I don't use the same presets for them because I want to get the most out of each guitar. That is the beauty of the AX8. You can have two identical presets, tweaked slightly for different guitars and switching takes no time at all. I don't see a reason not to. Now, for my humbucker presets, I start from scratch. Those Gibson pickups just respond so differently to gain and I generally use it for higher gain rock tunes, so best to start from scratch.
 

JRFarmer

Inspired
That is the beauty of the AX8. You can have two identical presets, tweaked slightly for different guitars and switching takes no time at all.
This. Worrying about and dealing with different outputs levels from different guitars was something you needed to do when you only had one rig (one amp and your meticulously dialed-in effects). AX8 solves your problem by providing you with 512 completely separate guitar rigs (512 presets). Just copy and tweak for each guitar.
 

Akstrat

Inspired
Right on guys! To date, I have been reaching down and using the Output knob to compensate when I change guitars in a gig. To be honest, I've just been lazy about spending a couple hours tweaking and creating individual presets for each of my guitars and tones. Today is the day of change!
 

chrisjnyc

Forum Addict
It's a problem! When I switch from my Les Paul humbuckers to a single P90 in my LP Jr it can lose a lot of definition on some patches. I have thought about building a second version of the patch to tune it better for the P90's... but I dont play the LP Jr that much to invest the time... most of the time I just ride the volume and tone knobs for a quick fix.
 

MBJ

Regular
I Use my main patches copy them to a different location and edit them for what guitar I’m using as every guitar has different tone volume ect and name them for easy reference ie Les Paul, Tele, PRS works great
 

Callan

Inspired
It's possibly also application dependant.
At home/studio, I think a preset per guitar makes the most sense.

I'll set up some patches for specific songs in our cover band, but I'll always have at least 2 guitars with me on stage in case of string breaks etc.
I like my presets to work with any guitar I might feel like playing that night, thankfully they are all fairly similar. (The Strat generally stays home for this reason)

Preset changes are also automated with band helper, which can make changes for guitar specific presets harder, so I need the versatility.
 
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