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Reverb too loud

Jens973

Regular
Hi,

at tonights rehearsal I recognized that the reverb on my presets is way too loud. Well, so turn it down and thats it. But what is surprising me is that the dry/reverb mix is set to only 15% wet signal but still is too loud. How I can better fine tune the level of reverb? Is it normal that 15% wet is still so much of effect?

Thanks for ideas on that!
 

Matt_B_77

Forum Addict
I use a medium plate most of the time and I keep the mix at around 10% and it's a tight reverb to being with.

Did you set up your presets at rehearsal volume level?
 

Jens973

Regular
I use a medium plate most of the time and I keep the mix at around 10% and it's a tight reverb to being with.

Did you set up your presets at rehearsal volume level?
no, I set them up at home with "low" volume level. I knwo that I need to adjust it with higher volume, but like I said, the mix is already quite low at 15%. I am using a "large plate" and purpose is just to get away the super dry feeling of the signal.

I will give it a shot with a medium plate.
 

chris

Legend!
you can reduce the "Input Trim" (input level?) as well, in the Reverb block. sometimes low percentages are easy to hear, and i still don't exactly understand why. so i adjust the Input Trim as well as needed, when in serial routing.
 
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Matt_B_77

Forum Addict
no, I set them up at home with "low" volume level. I knwo that I need to adjust it with higher volume, but like I said, the mix is already quite low at 15%. I am using a "large plate" and purpose is just to get away the super dry feeling of the signal.
That's the same reason I use him. I normally don't like a lot of ambience getting in the way.

I also reduce the Echo Density value to save CPU cost and it just happens to tighten up the reverb too.
 

jon

Fractal Fanatic
I usually have it at about 8% for live...15 might be a bit much if you aren't using it for an effect, just a little body to the sound. Then use the level like Chris said, to taste. Level is probably too high.
 

lqdsnddist

Axe-Master
Have to set it somewhere on a preset..... Some will say it’s too much, some will say it’s too little, some may say it’s just right.

No way to make everyone happy, so luckily you can adjust to taste
 

unix-guy

Legend!
You might also reduce the Time parameter. I've got mine Reverb somewhere around 15%, too... But I don't like "obvious" reverb most of the time and that helps for me.
 

Jens973

Regular
you can reduce the "Input Trim" (input level?) as well, in the Reverb block. sometimes low percentages are easy to hear, and i still don't exactly understand why. so i adjust the Input Trim as well as needed, when in serial routing.
this works great for me ! Thanks to all.
 

reclavea

Forum Addict
you can reduce the "Input Trim" (input level?) as well, in the Reverb block. sometimes low percentages are easy to hear, and i still don't exactly understand why. so i adjust the Input Trim as well as needed, when in serial routing.
What is the perceived difference from just lowering the mix?

I'm at around 12% +or-, for cleans and at about 15% too +or- for solos.
 

JoKeR III

Veteran
Set the Input Gain (in the BASIC tab on unit, mixer section in AX8 Edit) to 50%, then adjust the Mix to achieve the desired tone. Allows for more "fine tuning" of the mix. Not sure how it impacts effects run in parallel though, my chains are typically in series configuration.
 

yek

Moderator
Moderator
Unlike the Delay block, the Mix setting in the Reverb has an impact on the level of the dry tone.

I don’t like that, so I always put Reverb in a parallel path, with Mix at 100, Level at 0 and use Input Gain to dial in the desired amount of reverb. This also prevents reverb “bursts” when switching presets, because the level is constant.

A similar result can be obtained by keeping Reverb in series, with Mix at 50 and Level at 3 to compensate, and use Input Gain to dial in the desired amount of reverb. This will keep the dry signal constant.
 

unix-guy

Legend!
If it sounds good at home, but too much for a gig, use the Reverb Mix control in the Global menu. This turns the reverb in all presets up or down. This parameter exists specifically for this purpose.
Only if you've set the Reverb block to use Global Mix, though, correct?
 

unix-guy

Legend!
A similar result can be obtained by keeping Reverb in series, with Mix at 50 and Level at 3 to compensate, and use Input Gain to dial in the desired amount of reverb. This will keep the dry signal constant.
Yep.. that's what I use.
 

Jens973

Regular
If it sounds good at home, but too much for a gig, use the Reverb Mix control in the Global menu. This turns the reverb in all presets up or down. This parameter exists specifically for this purpose.
I saw that parameter but the impact it had wasnt really enough
 

lqdsnddist

Axe-Master
Generally you need little to no reverb at a gig, becasue the venue is already going to be rather reverberant. At home you’ve got carpet, a smaller room etc, some reverb sounds good. If the venue is big, concrete floors etc, it’s already got high reverberation so what can happen is the added reverb just makes things muddy sounding.
 
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