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PC program/app that will help isolate guitar tracks?

Hi all,
Can anybody recommend a PC program or APP that will easily allow me to isolate guitar tracks from music that I have stored on my pc?
One of the main reasons for buying my AX8 was to try to be able to create harmony guitar parts for my own enjoyment. Id like to be able to separate guitar tracks to help me hear what's going on when bands play twin guitar harmonies. I recently bought Mokes ( @Moke) excellent "The boys are back in town" preset and even though I'm a life long Thin Lizzy fan I would have never been able to work out what was going on with the harmonies there with my ears in the full music mix track. Plus I think a bit of track isolation could be good to try to work out some decent tone matching experiments.
I'm not that good with PC's or technology so a program or app that is easy to operate would be best.
Thank you in advance.
 
As far as I'm aware nothing like this exists (is it even possible?). Guitars are full range so trying to separate instruments by frequency is out. Also even if something could be done to accentuate the guitars during harmonies, it's never something you'd want to use for tonematching. If you're trying to learn a guitar part and ear training isn't for you, all I can really recommend is tabs or youtube videos. For tonematching you'll need a clear recording with no bleed from other instruments or it will greatly alter your results.
 

Moke

Axe-Master
Vendor
YouTube is your friend, most of the time....

You can find many isolated tracks as well as various versions with one particular instrument left out. Like a 'karaoke' track for guitarist, bassist, drummers, etc....

 

Bakerman

Axe-Master
Amazing Slow Downer and Riffstation can be useful for hearing parts.

Riffstation installers:
(PC) https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/riffstation-downloads/Riffstation.exe
(Mac) https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/riffstation-downloads/Riffstation.dmg

In ASD try the Karaoke (KA) function with slowdown type III selected. This will remove centered sounds and maintain stereo panning of what remains. (To be exact, partially-panned sounds end up fully left/right at reduced volume.)

The "isolate" tool in Riffstation is more adjustable. Enable it in "solo" (S) mode and set the filter knob to minimum with "hi" selected to start. Try various width settings and L/R slider positions.

ASD sounds better for slowing things down. Riffstation does some weird things to stereo imaging when slowing down while using the isolate tool. Sometimes I'll export a filtered normal-speed clip with Riffstation and slow that down in ASD.
 

volothamp

Inspired
If you’re into programming you could try this

https://github.com/deezer/spleeter

This is “neural” so it should be cool.
Jokes aside, is a pretrained tensor flow model specialising in isolating tracks. I think it works better with vocals, but it could be interesting to give a try. I haven’t done that yet
 
Thank you @SalazarMcMantis @Moke @Bakerman and @volothamp for your replies with an apology for the slow reply.
A big thank you especially to Bakerman for the RiffStation link. Its a program I've used in the past but had totally forgotten about. For the time being it's the one I'm enjoying playing around with.
I don't think I'm experienced enough just yet to try the GitHub link just yet but I will certainly give it a look when the chance arises.
I'm having fun at the moment with Riffstation and some Thin Lizzy songs which are always rich in harmony. I'm doing simple stuff and working out harmony scale intervals note by note from guitar 1 and guitar 2 parts. I'm very much a new starter to this but so far Id say the custom scale harmonizer is my fave tool on my AX8 at the moment.
Thank you all again for your help and advice.
Brett
 

alcyppa

Inspired
Thank you @SalazarMcMantis @Moke @Bakerman and @volothamp for your replies with an apology for the slow reply.
A big thank you especially to Bakerman for the RiffStation link. Its a program I've used in the past but had totally forgotten about. For the time being it's the one I'm enjoying playing around with.
I don't think I'm experienced enough just yet to try the GitHub link just yet but I will certainly give it a look when the chance arises.
I'm having fun at the moment with Riffstation and some Thin Lizzy songs which are always rich in harmony. I'm doing simple stuff and working out harmony scale intervals note by note from guitar 1 and guitar 2 parts. I'm very much a new starter to this but so far Id say the custom scale harmonizer is my fave tool on my AX8 at the moment.
Thank you all again for your help and advice.
Brett
Online version of Spleeter:

http://www.splitter.ai/


Have fun!
 

Rich G.

Experienced
As mentioned above, isolated tracks can be found on YouTube for some songs.

AnyTune Pro+ app has some features that allow you to isolate. It's the best app I've found to date for learning songs.

Karaoke Versions aren't the original tracks, but they are really well done and produced. You can create a custom track that allows you to solo out different instruments. Each song has a sample segment that you can try out before buying the song. Often times the sample is all you need to figure out certain guitar parts. Here's a direct link to The Boys Are Back In Town.
 
A massive thank you to both @alcyppa and @Rich G. for the links to splitter and Karaoke versions/ Anytune Pro+ respectively.
I was a bit puzzled as to what to do with splitter but once I figured it out I think it's a great tool to play around with.
I haven't had much free time to try the karaoke versions or the Anytune Pro+ just yet but they are on my list of things to do.
But a BIG thank you to one and all the above for your helpful links and advice. You have all re-ignited my love for music and the guitar. I'm now finding that I'm listening to music tracks a bit more carefully (especially when isolated) and really getting back into playing my guitar.
Thank you.
Brett
 
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