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Malmsteen chord progression

juanpmoran

Inspired
Hi!

So i encountered this chord progression from Yngwie:

Bm - C#dim (with dim 7th) - D - Edim -F#

Played on keyboard


I tried to find out the the tonal function of each chord with the harmonic minor grades in Bm:



But there are some chord substitutions or modulations:

I (OK) - II (OK) - III (the 5th should be augmented not perfect, that's an A note out of the scale) - IV(it should not be diminished) - V (OK)

Anyone could share some insight of what is going on with this chord progression?

Thank you in advance
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
Bm - I (root)
C#dim - Dominant substitute for A7 which then resolves to...
D - III (relative major of Bm)
Edim - same as C# dim, the tritone wants to resolve to...
F#7 - V

Chord notes don't have to strictly follow a scale. That helps give music interest. The first diminished chord is providing tension which releases to the relative major. The second diminished chord resolves to the V.

Diminished chords act similarly to 7th chords. They contain a tritone. That tritone wants to resolve. The first diminished chord resolves by the C# going to D and the G going to F#. The second diminished chord resolves by the D going to F# and the other notes not moving.

The Edim to F# reinforces the minor 6 to 5 to I cadence.
 

unix-guy

Legend!
That’s cool, I see the C#dim as a V chord...in the key of Bm...but there is the duality with the relative major or minor.
But C#dim and Edim are the same notes, and E is the iv in the key of Bmin and there is an F# already (the actual v of Bmin) then how does that compute? ;)
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
That’s cool, I see the C#dim as a V chord...in the key of Bm...but there is the duality with the relative major or minor.
Dominant chords can resolve to anything that resolves the tension. They don't have to resolve to the root. One little trick is resolving to the relative major/minor.

Then there are all kinds of substitutes, i.e. bII, bVI, etc.

Then there are dominant chords that resolve to modal chords, i.e. V of ii.

Harmony is all about adding non-scalar notes and creating tension and release.

For example, in the key of C you can use a D7 to lead to a G7 which then resolves to C. This progression is V of V, V, I. Or you could substitute C#7 (technically Db7)for the G7 since they both have the same tritone. Now the bass line descends but the tritones are the same. Then add some nice suspensions to anchor the upper harmonies and you have a pretty arrangement.
 

luke

Fractal Fanatic
Dominant chords can resolve to anything that resolves the tension. They don't have to resolve to the root. One little trick is resolving to the relative major/minor.

Then there are all kinds of substitutes, i.e. bII, bVI, etc.

Then there are dominant chords that resolve to modal chords, i.e. V of ii.

Harmony is all about adding non-scalar notes and creating tension and release.

For example, in the key of C you can use a D7 to lead to a G7 which then resolves to C. This progression is V of V, V, I. Or you could substitute C#7 (technically Db7)for the G7 since they both have the same tritone. Now the bass line descends but the tritones are the same. Then add some nice suspensions to anchor the upper harmonies and you have a pretty arrangement.
Maybe you want to quit your day job and give lessons, I hear it pays well. ;)
 

200man

Veteran
Dominant chords can resolve to anything that resolves the tension. They don't have to resolve to the root. One little trick is resolving to the relative major/minor.

Then there are all kinds of substitutes, i.e. bII, bVI, etc.

Then there are dominant chords that resolve to modal chords, i.e. V of ii.

Harmony is all about adding non-scalar notes and creating tension and release.

For example, in the key of C you can use a D7 to lead to a G7 which then resolves to C. This progression is V of V, V, I. Or you could substitute C#7 (technically Db7)for the G7 since they both have the same tritone. Now the bass line descends but the tritones are the same. Then add some nice suspensions to anchor the upper harmonies and you have a pretty arrangement.
If you want to kick this up a notch...oh and welcome to the world of jazz....check out Barry Harris and the 6th diminished system:
edit: right at the beginning he discusses this method contains a dominant for the major and a dominant for the relative minor. Barry Harris is wonderful!:)
 
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200man

Veteran
@FractalAudio

This next link may be more topical in the discussion of relative major/minor theory. I recently ran across this video and could appreciate the methodical way they discussed re-harmonizing progressions. Interesting, no! :)

 
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