• We would like to remind our members that this is a privately owned, run and supported forum. You are here at the invitation and discretion of the owners. As such, rules and standards of conduct will be applied that help keep this forum functioning as the owners desire. These include, but are not limited to, removing content and even access to the forum.

    Please give yourself a refresher on the forum rules you agreed to follow when you signed up.

Low end issues with verb (is low cut in the verb block my answer)

jlynnb1

Fractal Fanatic
Having some issues on some of my big ambient patches, getting a sort of low end rumble that is almost causing feedback if i'm not careful. should i just chop off lows in the block with a cut up to whatever freq stops it? does that affect only the reverb decay or the tone itself? (as of now i run my verbs in series)

this is mainly happening on patches where I use Deep Space with a high mix, when it starts swirling the low end can get out control pretty quick.
 

jefferski

Fractal Fanatic
Yep, low cut in the reverb block, it should only affect the verb and not your tone.
I don't use this much w/ the Axe, but I do it all the time in my DAW.
 

philipacamaniac

Fractal Fanatic
The EQ parameters in the Reverb block affect the reverberation only, not the dry. But, if running in series with a high mix, it will make an audible difference in your overall tone. Based on your description, low cut (HPF) is the first parameter I'd reach for. You don't usually need giant ambience rolling around below 80Hz in any case.
 

jlynnb1

Fractal Fanatic
that's what I assumed, just wanted to be sure it wasn't affecting the overall tone. I mean, we are talking a 4-6db spike from the low end rumble in that verb. it can get out of control fast!
 

jlynnb1

Fractal Fanatic
i guess since i'm running the verb at a pretty high mix (40-45%) for this type of tone, perhaps I should experiment with it in parallel as well so the high cut won't affect the main tone as much.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
The reverb tail is divided into three bands. The low-frequency band is defined by LF Xover and LF Time. LF Xover sets the crossover frequency between the low and mid bands. LF Time controls the decay time of the low band relative to the mid band. So if LF Time is 2.0 the low-frequency decay time will be twice as long as the mid-band time. You may be able to use this to reduce low-frequency buildup.

High-frequency decay time works a bit differently. There is a single HF Time parameter. It controls the high-frequency absorption of the virtual room. The lower the value the faster the high frequencies decay relative to mid-band. A value of 1.0 means no high-frequency absorption.

The EQ page then controls equalization of the resulting tail. You can further shape the sound of the reverb using this, if desired.

Real rooms tend to have a slightly longer low-frequency decay and a shorter high-frequency decay. However if you're using LOTS of simulated reverb within a real reverberant environment then you can get low-frequency buildup. The tips above should help you adjust to the environment.
 

jlynnb1

Fractal Fanatic
The reverb tail is divided into three bands. The low-frequency band is defined by LF Xover and LF Time. LF Xover sets the crossover frequency between the low and mid bands. LF Time controls the decay time of the low band relative to the mid band. So if LF Time is 2.0 the low-frequency decay time will be twice as long as the mid-band time. You may be able to use this to reduce low-frequency buildup.

High-frequency decay time works a bit differently. There is a single HF Time parameter. It controls the high-frequency absorption of the virtual room. The lower the value the faster the high frequencies decay relative to mid-band. A value of 1.0 means no high-frequency absorption.

The EQ page then controls equalization of the resulting tail. You can further shape the sound of the reverb using this, if desired.

Real rooms tend to have a slightly longer low-frequency decay and a shorter high-frequency decay. However if you're using LOTS of simulated reverb within a real reverberant environment then you can get low-frequency buildup. The tips above should help you adjust to the environment.
awesome, thanks for the reply, i'll play with those. i'm going direct FOH and have my CLR on stage for a little volume/vibe and it's happening on all three fronts, but also on the horizontal meters when the signal isn't even amplified, so i'm sure it's just buildup from the size of the verb, decay time and mix. would high modulation affect the low end at all? on this type of patch i usually run it around 50-60% in the verb block.
 
Top Bottom