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Looking for best online guitar instruction to improve technique

Scented Meat

Power User
As of yesterday the OL and I are empty nesters. I have the need, motivation, and--at last--the time to bring much-needed improvement to my playing skills. There does not seem to be a teacher around who's available when I need them to be, so I think I'm stuck with virtual instruction. I have a number of
Truefire courses, but they're mostly to do with theory, which is fine, but I'm really looking for solid instruction on technique, especially alternate picking, etc. Random youtube videos just aren't going to cut it. I'm really hoping for some format that allows for feedback from an instructor.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Karsten
 

GlennO

Fractal Fanatic
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ has a wide selection of good quality videos that cover specific techniques or specific styles or specific artists at different skill levels. The instructors will give you feedback on your progress if you want to submit videos of yourself playing the lessons. The important thing is they are consistent quality so you don't waste a lot of time sifting through random videos.
 

TSJMajesty

Power User
I know this isn't what you asked, but this may still be relevant, assuming you don't already know them. These 3 ideas have probably been the most important for me, in helping me progress the most.

1) Practice with a metronome. Pretty much "Technique Building 101", but not everyone realizes the importance. Axe & FM3 have one built in.
2) Work on keeping all your fingers as close as possible to the fretboard, especially that pinky. Economy-of-motion becomes so much more important at faster speeds. Google 'Bernth Guitar' and watch how close his fingers stay near the fretboard.
3) Practice fragments of any riff at double speed, even if it's only 4 16th notes. Play the 16th-note lick at, say at 65 bpm, then do a 4-note burst at 130. Do that burst with a different set of 4 notes; do the burst 2 times, then 3, etc. Also, break up the riff so the 4 notes will include changing strings, in both directions. Practice starting with a downstroke as well.

Doing that #3, in the different variations, has really helped me with string changes. Depending on which stroke you're on, and what string you're changing to, they can be easy, or hard. I have trouble with switching from a downstroke on, say a G, to an upstroke on a B. But reverse the strokes going from G to B, and it's much easier, thus the importance of working the different combinations.

Things like, how you're holding your pick, the pick slant, how you're muting strings, i.e., the mechanics, are items where having someone give you feedback can be very valuable, so good luck!
 

Scented Meat

Power User
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ has a wide selection of good quality videos that cover specific techniques or specific styles or specific artists at different skill levels. The instructors will give you feedback on your progress if you want to submit videos of yourself playing the lessons. The important thing is they are consistent quality so you don't waste a lot of time sifting through random videos.
I will check it out; thanks for the recommendation.
 

Scented Meat

Power User
I know this isn't what you asked, but this may still be relevant, assuming you don't already know them. These 3 ideas have probably been the most important for me, in helping me progress the most.

1) Practice with a metronome. Pretty much "Technique Building 101", but not everyone realizes the importance. Axe & FM3 have one built in.
2) Work on keeping all your fingers as close as possible to the fretboard, especially that pinky. Economy-of-motion becomes so much more important at faster speeds. Google 'Bernth Guitar' and watch how close his fingers stay near the fretboard.
3) Practice fragments of any riff at double speed, even if it's only 4 16th notes. Play the 16th-note lick at, say at 65 bpm, then do a 4-note burst at 130. Do that burst with a different set of 4 notes; do the burst 2 times, then 3, etc. Also, break up the riff so the 4 notes will include changing strings, in both directions. Practice starting with a downstroke as well.

Doing that #3, in the different variations, has really helped me with string changes. Depending on which stroke you're on, and what string you're changing to, they can be easy, or hard. I have trouble with switching from a downstroke on, say a G, to an upstroke on a B. But reverse the strokes going from G to B, and it's much easier, thus the importance of working the different combinations.

Things like, how you're holding your pick, the pick slant, how you're muting strings, i.e., the mechanics, are items where having someone give you feedback can be very valuable, so good luck!
Great advice, thanks!

It's funny you mention Bernth. I'm actually a Patreon patron of his (as well as Ben Eller), and I'm working my way through his "30 day picking workout" exercises, which I hope will be helpful. I need a 2- or 3-year program. But I'll definitely try to incorporate your suggestions.
 

TSJMajesty

Power User
Both of those guys are great!
Not sure if I'm limiting myself, but between Paul Gilbert, John Petrucci, guys like Bernth & Uncle Ben, etc., buying Paul & John's instruction vids & books, and just trying to incorporate as many suggestions as I can, that will work for me (I cannot get with holding the pick the way Bernth says to), I have yet to go back to any type of lessons, whether video or in person, since about 30 years ago, yet I can still see my technique improving. Learning about pick slant, economy of motion, etc. has really helped.

The only question for me is whether some lessons would get me there faster. I may yet consider them, but as long as I practice every day, which I do, some days for 4 hours or so, and have access to all the info we have today (what a great time to be a guitar player), but for now, I'm not only getting there, but really enjoying the journey.
(oh, and I must mention Songsterr.com as well- it's not 100% perfect, but damn does it cut the learning curve for me substantially)
 

MojoBodies

Inspired
I've watched many of his song videos--and they're great--but my technique is so bad I can't play most of the songs I try to learn. :(
From what you posted maybe Steve Stine is right for you... he has a lot of online courses and has a really good teaching style that makes things simple. You can check him out on youtube (free lessons) or purchase courses online.

 

2204JCM

Inspired
I know this isn't what you asked, but this may still be relevant, assuming you don't already know them. These 3 ideas have probably been the most important for me, in helping me progress the most.

1) Practice with a metronome. Pretty much "Technique Building 101", but not everyone realizes the importance. Axe & FM3 have one built in.
2) Work on keeping all your fingers as close as possible to the fretboard, especially that pinky. Economy-of-motion becomes so much more important at faster speeds. Google 'Bernth Guitar' and watch how close his fingers stay near the fretboard.
3) Practice fragments of any riff at double speed, even if it's only 4 16th notes. Play the 16th-note lick at, say at 65 bpm, then do a 4-note burst at 130. Do that burst with a different set of 4 notes; do the burst 2 times, then 3, etc. Also, break up the riff so the 4 notes will include changing strings, in both directions. Practice starting with a downstroke as well.

Doing that #3, in the different variations, has really helped me with string changes. Depending on which stroke you're on, and what string you're changing to, they can be easy, or hard. I have trouble with switching from a downstroke on, say a G, to an upstroke on a B. But reverse the strokes going from G to B, and it's much easier, thus the importance of working the different combinations.

Things like, how you're holding your pick, the pick slant, how you're muting strings, i.e., the mechanics, are items where having someone give you feedback can be very valuable, so good luck!
Yes, learning how to practice properly and analyze and “chase down” your mistakes one by one. For example realizing when you are playing tense and slowing it down enough to not be tense is critical. Playing fast is about being efficient and not being faster. Big difference.
Most of these sites just don’t cover this in enough detail. Instead they simply give you a list of exercises to do-useless.
 

PincoTech

Experienced
As of yesterday the OL and I are empty nesters. I have the need, motivation, and--at last--the time to bring much-needed improvement to my playing skills. There does not seem to be a teacher around who's available when I need them to be, so I think I'm stuck with virtual instruction. I have a number of
Truefire courses, but they're mostly to do with theory, which is fine, but I'm really looking for solid instruction on technique, especially alternate picking, etc. Random youtube videos just aren't going to cut it. I'm really hoping for some format that allows for feedback from an instructor.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Karsten
You mentioned "especially alternate picking".
That immediately made me think of Al Dimeola. I learned a massive amount from that tutorial back in the day, and it stuck.
there's a vhs tape floating around of Al Dimeola on alternate picking, and i think it might even be able to be found on youtube or elsewhere.
Just a fragment of what you're looking for , but hope its something
 
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