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IR Length

Wolfenstein98k

Power User
How would you stop the reflections from the ground?

Keep in mind the speed of sound and the distance involved....

A good studio and an aeroplane hanger would yield similar results due to the speed of sound.

One is cheaper and more accessible though
That's why I said "an oval + pointed to the sky". Unless the volume has to be particularly loud?
 

jon

Fractal Fanatic
Sound travels in all directions.....it's like waves emanating from a source.....there WILL be reflections from the back unless the speaker is somehow only unidirectional which is clearly not the case. A speaker vibrates MOST of its energy to the front but there will also be sound generated to the back and sides as well, which will inevitably cause reflections.

These reflections happen so quickly (at the speed sound) that it's VERY difficult to avoid them.....sound travels so quickly it covers huge distances in milliseconds.
 

Wolfenstein98k

Power User
Sound travels in all directions.....it's like waves emanating from a source.....there WILL be reflections from the back unless the speaker is somehow only unidirectional which is clearly not the case. A speaker vibrates MOST of its energy to the front but there will also be sound generated to the back and sides as well, which will inevitably cause reflections.

These reflections happen so quickly (at the speed sound) that it's VERY difficult to avoid them.....sound travels so quickly it covers huge distances in milliseconds.
Yeah, I get that. I'm assuming that sound waves travel directionally though - ie the only reflections that hit the mic are those that bounced off a surface and then into the mic, which would be almost none of the emanating waves.

On top of that, surely the waves caught in any modern IR are orders of magnitude worse - they'd be bouncing off the floor and into a mic set an inch away within what, less than 2ms?

EDIT
Okay, so my idea is to suspend the amp and the mic away from each other by the requisite distance (say 20 feet), and off the floor and walls by (say) 20 feet.

This would leave a gap between the "direct" signal and the earliest possible reflection of >17ms.
 
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