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Inverted screens.....please

Tahoebrian5

Fractal Fanatic
If when I ever start playing gigs again, I will be using old school scribble strip tape to cover over the lcd’s so I can read something even if it’s tape. No point to change layouts between presets if I can’t read em so it’s going to have to be a static layout at which point the lcds are worthless.
 
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JoKeR III

Power User
I have 20/100 and 20/70 vision, wear contacts or 1.75 diopter readers, am 6' 1" (185.5cm) tall and with correction, have no issues reading the scribble strips while standing as they are. I'm very curious how they look to those who can't see them, even with readers. Are you able to read the display on the Axe III, FM9 or FM3? Do you need to use a dark mode on your computers and phone to be able to read anything on the monitor or screen? I wonder if it's a refresh rate issue rather than a contrast issue?

May be talking out my butt, only trying to understand, get clarity on the issue and hope they can develop a solution that works for everyone. The FC is an indispensable tool that I agree should be accessible to every FAS user.

I have adjusted the scribble strip and LED settings quite a bit, but even at default are still legible with contacts or readers. At default, I'm barely able to make out what is displayed in the scribble strips but is better with the following adjustments:

  • FC Mini-Display Brightness=39%
  • FC Global Brightness=34%
  • LED Ring Intensity Bright=35%
  • LED Ring Intensity Dim=5%.
 

JoKeR III

Power User
One more question, is there any scenario where you are able to read the mini displays? If so, what distance, environment and settings?
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
I have 20/100 and 20/70 vision, wear contacts or 1.75 diopter readers, am 6' 1" (185.5cm) tall and with correction, have no issues reading the scribble strips while standing as they are. I'm very curious how they look to those who can't see them, even with readers. Are you able to read the display on the Axe III, FM9 or FM3? Do you need to use a dark mode on your computers and phone to be able to read anything on the monitor or screen? I wonder if it's a refresh rate issue rather than a contrast issue?

May be talking out my butt, only trying to understand, get clarity on the issue and hope they can develop a solution that works for everyone. The FC is an indispensable tool that I agree should be accessible to every FAS user.

I have adjusted the scribble strip and LED settings quite a bit, but even at default are still legible with contacts or readers. At default, I'm barely able to make out what is displayed in the scribble strips but is better with the following adjustments:

  • FC Mini-Display Brightness=39%
  • FC Global Brightness=34%
  • LED Ring Intensity Bright=35%
  • LED Ring Intensity Dim=5%.
In my case, there seems to be a difference in the type of LCD screen used in the small switch labels vs. the bigger screen. The bigger screen's black is flatter and blacker than the small screens, with sharper edge definition, both of which make it easier to see than the small ones. View angle is critical on the small ones, too, while being less important on the bigger one. The little ones have a little bit of a swimmy look to them, like what you see in the optician's scope when (s)he starts flipping the different lenses in and out....
 

Tahoebrian5

Fractal Fanatic
You have a fair point. I can’t stand contacts and wearing readers on stage not very rock and roll. Just seems like there is a lot of room for improvement in the lcd strips that could make it a whole lot better.
 

JoKeR III

Power User
You have a fair point. I can’t stand contacts and wearing readers on stage not very rock and roll. Just seems like there is a lot of room for improvement in the lcd strips that could make it a whole lot better.
I hear you, I'm not a fan of contacts either and I don't want to wear readers for a performance (Saw a show of The Who at Royal Albert Hall and Pete Townsend was wearing readers and using a music stand, it just felt wrong). I was starting to have problems seeing my fretboard in low lighting and needed a solution. Tried readers at rehearsals and discovered the fringe benefit of seeing my controller a lot clearer. After a few months with my Ophthalmologist, I ended up with daily contacts and am surprised at how comfortable they are. Still a pain in the butt to put in but once they're in, I rarely notice them. But I digress.

I guess I'm the type of person who will do what's necessary in order to use something I consider vital to continue playing rather than wait for a solution. At this stage in life, I'm a bit worried that if I take any type of a break, I'll likely not get back into it. No wrong approach or ideology, just personal convictions and preferences exemplified. I really hope there's a solution, I couldn't imagine not having an FC in a live situation with the Axe III.
 

MGW

Inspired
I wear readers anytime I need to read...computer, AF3, the dashboard in my truck,...I'm 6' 4", so if I'm sitting down, I can read them with my readers. Standing up, there in that sweet spot where they're too far away for readers and far enough away for my eyes to be able to focus on them. I've thought about bi-focal contacts, but I'm not sure they'd help in this situation.
 

JoKeR III

Power User
I wear readers anytime I need to read...computer, AF3, the dashboard in my truck,...I'm 6' 4", so if I'm sitting down, I can read them with my readers. Standing up, there in that sweet spot where they're too far away for readers and far enough away for my eyes to be able to focus on them. I've thought about bi-focal contacts, but I'm not sure they'd help in this situation.
I tried bifocal glasses and they did work, really well actually. I just didn't like how the glasses felt on my nose. I had them make the lenses with the top of the bifocal at the lowest possible position on the lens so I could easily look over the top of the bifocal area to read the strips on the floor.

When I decided to try contacts, I wound up with a great ophthalmologist. I asked about bifocal contacts and he suggested two different powers for each eye instead of bifocal. It's a compromise, one eye will be a bit blurry at distance and the other for near, but he worked with me to figure out which pairing worked best for the environment I was in most of the time. I'm very happy with the results, it's nice to see a greater range (near to mid-range) clearly again.
 

SASouth

Inspired
I have tried contacts and I've tried bifocals. Neither work for me. If I wear bifocals, I can't read the computer screen so I have to take off my glasses to use Axe-Edit or Logic. When I take off my glasses I can't read the scribble strips. What's worse my eyes can't tolerate contacts. They are easily irritated.

Without some flexibility in the configuration of the scribble strips such as far as font size and white text on a black background, I'm hosed either way. I really need this change.
 

Rex

Legend!
I have tried contacts and I've tried bifocals. Neither work for me. If I wear bifocals, I can't read the computer screen so I have to take off my glasses to use Axe-Edit or Logic. When I take off my glasses I can't read the scribble strips. What's worse my eyes can't tolerate contacts. They are easily irritated.

Without some flexibility in the configuration of the scribble strips such as far as font size and white text on a black background, I'm hosed either way. I really need this change.
For those who use bifocals, progressive lenses are way more practical than the traditional lens-within-a-lens, and they may work better for you.

Also for those who wear bifocals, there are "computer lenses" that are essentially bifocals that have been dialed in for close-range to about 10 feet out. They have a much larger mid-distance sweet spot, and they can often get you by from keyboard to screen to anything ten or so feet away, without removing your glasses.
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
For those who use bifocals, progressive lenses are way more practical than the traditional lens-within-a-lens, and they may work better for you.

Tried those about 14-15 years ago. Didn't get on well with them. The people who you work with getting them don't listen when you tell them it needs adjustments, and I ended up with glasses that didn't line up the regions well and had me tripping over stuff and fearful of stairs due to inability to judge distances.

Also for those who wear bifocals, there are "computer lenses" that are essentially bifocals that have been dialed in for close-range to about 10 feet out. They have a much larger mid-distance sweet spot, and they can often get you by from keyboard to screen to anything ten or so feet away, without removing your glasses.

Those "computer lenses" sound too good to be true. Tried getting through to the eye-measuring people last time that I needed something like that, but it didn't really seem to connect....
 

Rex

Legend!
Tried those about 14-15 years ago. Didn't get on well with them. The people who you work with getting them don't listen when you tell them it needs adjustments, and I ended up with glasses that didn't line up the regions well and had me tripping over stuff and fearful of stairs due to inability to judge distances.



Those "computer lenses" sound too good to be true. Tried getting through to the eye-measuring people last time that I needed something like that, but it didn't really seem to connect....
I think you need to find a new optical service. I’ve been wearing progressive bifocals for nearly 20 years, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

For some people, “computer glasses” can be fixed-focus, even if they normally wear bifocals. Maybe that’ll work for you, too. But they can be bifocals, too. If your shop doesn’t know what that means, it’s time to shop for a new shop.
 

SASouth

Inspired
For those who use bifocals, progressive lenses are way more practical than the traditional lens-within-a-lens, and they may work better for you.

Also for those who wear bifocals, there are "computer lenses" that are essentially bifocals that have been dialed in for close-range to about 10 feet out. They have a much larger mid-distance sweet spot, and they can often get you by from keyboard to screen to anything ten or so feet away, without removing your glasses.
They were progressive no line bifocals. Still no go.
 

SASouth

Inspired
Tried those about 14-15 years ago. Didn't get on well with them. The people who you work with getting them don't listen when you tell them it needs adjustments, and I ended up with glasses that didn't line up the regions well and had me tripping over stuff and fearful of stairs due to inability to judge distances.



Those "computer lenses" sound too good to be true. Tried getting through to the eye-measuring people last time that I needed something like that, but it didn't really seem to connect....
This exactly my experience.
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
I think you need to find a new optical service. I’ve been wearing progressive bifocals for nearly 20 years, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

For some people, “computer glasses” can be fixed-focus, even if they normally wear bifocals. Maybe that’ll work for you, too. But they can be bifocals, too. If your shop doesn’t know what that means, it’s time to shop for a new shop.

Are there any good ones in Arizona? Not limiting myself to just Phoenix metro.

Computer glasses with close-up in the bifocal part sounds exactly like what I was trying to get for my 'indoor' pair, with distance over 'computer' for the outdoor pair.
 

Danny W.

Experienced
Are there any good ones in Arizona? Not limiting myself to just Phoenix metro.

Computer glasses with close-up in the bifocal part sounds exactly like what I was trying to get for my 'indoor' pair, with distance over 'computer' for the outdoor pair.
We’ve been buying progressives from Costco for 27 years. Have used both the Glendale & Surprise warehouses. Not all the opticians do well with them, so we look for our favorites.

I have no problem with my FC-6. It helps to be short.:)

Danny W.
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
We’ve been buying progressives from Costco for 27 years. Have used both the Glendale & Surprise warehouses. Not all the opticians do well with them, so we look for our favorites.

I have no problem with my FC-6. It helps to be short.:)

Danny W.
The CostCo optician did my last set of glasses a couple years ago. Cave Creek/101. Not sure she got what I was asking for. I guess each location's people are equally adaptive.
 

JoKeR III

Power User
The CostCo optician did my last set of glasses a couple years ago. Cave Creek/101. Not sure she got what I was asking for. I guess each location's people are equally adaptive.
I guess I was fortunate. I had a condition a number of years ago that caused one of my eyes to dry out and has led me need an eye exam by an eye care center every couple of years now. I believe going to a specialist was key in helping me get what I needed. When I finally needed glasses, the Dr. asked if I had any specific needs so I told her about playing guitar and needing to see the fretboard as well as things on the floor clearer. She wrote two prescriptions for me, one for general everyday correction and one for stage.

The eye doc that I used for the contacts is the head of the Penny's vision center here. I was surprised to say the least at how knowledgeable and helpful he was. What I ended up with was a blend of the two prescriptions.

I guess the key is to find a Dr. or specialist who is willing to take the time to understand what you need and work with you. I went through 4 different prescription tweaks of trial contacts before finding what worked. The contacts I wear now has an adjusted reader in the left eye, the mid-range in the right.

BTW: The stage prescription was basically the mid-range correction (6-10ft) and a slightly lower power of the reader correction (pushed out to 2-3ft) of my prescription. Might be worth exploring for those who are still trying to find a vision correction solution.
 
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