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How to go about creating low volume patches

jw3571

Inspired
What are people's strategies when creating low volume distortion patches. I'm talking 70-75 db. Do you just crank the gain and then decrease the overall level? Do you keep a Marshall type amp at a gain around 5 then put a boost in front and crank it? Or do you keep the gain lower and then just crank the overall output level? What's worked best for everyone? I'm mostly playing 80's rock(GNR, Def Lepard, Motley Crue, etc).
 

chris

Legend!
how are these different than high volume tones? are you experiencing an issue when turning down?
 

lqdsnddist

Axe-Master
At 70-75 dB there is essentially no real Fletcher Munson effect (FM) within the guitar frequency range so it’s plenty loud enough for accurate sound design. In fact, most mix engineers will work around 78dB as their preferred monitoring level.

These aren’t “low” volume levels in the slightest and much louder will start to introduce increases ear fatigue, possible hearing damage etc
 

electronpirate

Moderator
Moderator
IMO not able to be done. Some have suggested that you put an EQ block at the end of your chain, and when at low volume, boost what you can't hear when it's loud (mids and highs for the most part). I personally have always found it unsatisfying or 'not quite there'. Most of us have families that don't understand loud stuff when they're trying to sleep...so I get the need to try to get there.

No replacement for volume for creating/playing patches. There's an interaction thing going on that you can't duplicate.

YMMV.
 

jw3571

Inspired
That's what I was afraid of electionpirate, i'm finding it hard to get incredible sounds at the lower volumes. I just can't get that great note separation when strumming a chord at lower volumes, it sounds muddy. I find myself trying the following. flip bright switch, increase presence, increase negative feedback, lower transformer match. Also finding a brighter cab seems to help. All these things help but are still not a replacement for volume.
 

lqdsnddist

Axe-Master
That's what I was afraid of electionpirate, i'm finding it hard to get incredible sounds at the lower volumes. I just can't get that great note separation when strumming a chord at lower volumes, it sounds muddy. I find myself trying the following. flip bright switch, increase presence, increase negative feedback, lower transformer match. Also finding a brighter cab seems to help. All these things help but are still not a replacement for volume.

Have you ever had your hearing checked? 70-75 dB is not a low volume level at all. I never really play anything louder than about 80db playing at home, listening to music etc.

If you’ve got some high frequency hearing loss a common complaint is lacking clarity as your not hearing the high frequencies at the same levels your hearing the lower frequencies.

It’s the same reason people turn up the volume on the tv, saying they can’t understand the dialogue, that people mumble etc.
 

jw3571

Inspired
Another question on creating low volume distortion presets. Have people had better luck with keeping the drive low and trying to crank the master, or cranking the drive and keeping the master lower? I've usually done the latter but that could be some of my problem.
 
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