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How To Get Consistent Volume Levels with Patches

Discussion in 'Axe-Fx II Discussion' started by ksmithdc, May 14, 2014.

  1. ksmithdc

    ksmithdc
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    Hi all,


    How do you get consistent volume levels with different patches? Some of the amp models are preset louder than other ones. For example, the CAE+ is louder than a Wrecker or a Dirty Shirley.

    I'd like to have uniform volume output - even when switching between my patches. Is there some kind of quick and easy way to configure my AxeFx2 so all the amp blocks have the same volume output?



    Thanks,



    Doc
     
  2. jlynnb1

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    No, you'll just have to use the level control to balance your patches.
     
  3. #3 Tones2, May 14, 2014
    Last edited: May 15, 2014
    Tones2

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    Luckily, the stock patches in the Axe FX2 are fairly levelized already - not all THAT many to me seem way louder / softer then the others. The community patches are a different story as expected - the volume are WAY all over the place. The best thing to do is to adjust output level per patch to make them even - which is an extreme hassle if you are doing all 500+ patches in the XL but most of us only use 30 patches or so at most consistently so you can just do them.

    The other issue is that it's hard to levelize patch volume in isolution at home, because if you are playing with a band, low gain sounds will cut through much more than high gain ones will, and mid frequences cut through more than bass or treble heavy patches. So just do what I do playing live - use a VOLUME pedal. :)

    Tony
     
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  4. luke

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    You have to buy a db meter and go one by one unfortunately.
     
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  5. Roadrunner

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    There is a much easier and cheaper way…
    First, if you HAVE to use a db meter you can always find an app (Android or iOS) and use it, it works nicely and a db here or there up or down want change much…
    What I do is I use volume increase and decrease on 2 switches in my MFC, and I'm adjusting the volume of the patch on the fly when we rehearse.
    After 2 rehearsals that’s it! I'm done.
     
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  6. ksmithdc

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    Thanks for the replies, everyone. I will just have to use my ears and adjust each preset to match the volume output of the other presets. It's not going to be that huge of an ordeal - given that I'm only using 5 presets right now.

    I was just kind of wondering if there was some configuration which would bring everything to the exact same output level.



    Doc
     
  7. stratos

    stratos
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    If your using a PC, download one of the free dB meters. (software / shows on your monitor). Plug in your USB from your AXE, and set the AXE as your sound card.
    This is what I use. Sorry, I am not at the machine right now, so I can't advise which one I downdloaded.
     
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  8. don_joe

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    Great idea! Thanks.
     
  9. don_joe

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    How do you assign those commands to the MFC switches? I've looked for it in the manual and didn't find it among the available functions.
     
  10. Nihilism

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  11. tommyco10

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    For my money, that's the best way to do it as PERCEIVED volume doesn't always match what the meter will read.

    This is especially true across patches which have a very different dynamic response or frequency curve. This also helps you balance yourself in context of the song against the other instruments. In this scenario, a meter alone will not help you.

    Having said that, it's always nice to have a visual reference.
     
  12. reclavea

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    Scott P's leveling method is a great place to start. Then home in during rehearsals or during the gig.

    I'm experimenting with using Pink/White noise thru my monitor and running thru my presets and adjusting to that. Rhythms balanced with the noise and solos set louder.

    I'm thinking certain clean and low gain settings are so diverse with the frequency spectrum ...ie darker/brighter (all sounding great) yet need special attention to balancing.
     
  13. dpeterson

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    not sure anyone has asked, but why cant the amps all have the same level to begin with? this would no doubt make it easier no?
     
  14. reclavea

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    Because loudness/volume is relative.....subjective.
     
  15. dpeterson

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    not if when he models things he checks it with a meter. every other modeler when you switch amps you don't get drastic changes in volume.
     
  16. Tones2

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    I would guess that if you are switching amp models in your OWN patch (I assume this is what you are talking about), that the "default" amp settings are what sounds best for that amp, which means varying levels of pre-gain and master volumes, so varying loudness levels. Most likely FA did not want to then change the output levels (i.e. post master channel volume) of the amp to match loudnesses between amp models because they have no idea what the rest of the gain stages in your patch is.
     
  17. Rich G.

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    See THIS thread.
     
  18. RoshRoslin

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    Non-master volume amps wouldn't work in this regard. The more you turn up the input gain the louder they get and also break up (depending on amp type). What level of Db would you "default" a fender twin at? What would the starting point on the input gain be? There's no easy answer and that's why there's no uniform volume for all the amps.
     
  19. jlynnb1

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    the problem with Db meters, like others have said, is that even though the patches might be the same decibel level their apparent loudness might be different, especially live or in a mix. my clean/breakup patch with matchless cuts far better than any gainier patch i've ever made, and even though they hit meters at the same db i have to have the gain patches at least 4db louder on a meter, sometimes more.

    granted this is due to the nature of a more compressed tone, but it just shows that a db meter alone won't get you where you want to go.
     
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  20. Johan Allard

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    The point of using a dB meter is only to get everything in the ballpark. So that something isn’t 10dB louder than anything else. I’ve started to use the Orban loudness meter recently with pink noise to get my presets to a decent starting levels, and then I use the +-1dB midi functions on two IA’s on the MFC to adjust the relative volume by playing. But by starting with the loudness meter (or indeed an audible dB meter) you get pretty close.

    And indeed, a clean preset will have a very different reading than a driven one so you have to treat clean presets differently. But if you document where you end up in relative levels, you can just reuse that information when dialling in other relative levels.
     

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