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High-shielded cables and EMI noise

From experience, Ferrite cores will indeed make your rig quieter in environments that have noise issues they were meant to help with (fluorescent light noise can often be solved with ferrites). Ferrites won't do diddly squat (sorry for the technical terminology) for you guitar. Shield the entire guitar control cavity and the pickup routes. Still noisy? Get Fluences.
 

guitarzen

Inspired
And the cavity covers. And make sure there's electrical contact between the covers and the shielding of the cavity itself.
This exactly. And also make sure the all ground wires inside the cavity are connected together. I took the time to properly shield my guitars and it made a huge difference in rejecting EMI noise.
 

tysonlt

Inspired
I my early days I glued some tin foil to the back of my les paul cover plate. It made so much difference that I wondered why it didn't come like that from the factory.

Recently when I finally changed my pickups from the stock I'd been using since 1996, I painted the entire cavity as far as I could reach with multiple layers of shielding paint and covered the plate with layers of reflective tape. I even put tape over the holes that the cables enter the cavity through, and used a dob of paint to connect to the bridge ground wire.

Long story short - it worked.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
My main workhorse guitar that I gigged with for probably over 10 years was a Warmoth parts-caster. I lined the control cavity and pickup cavities with copper shielding foil and attached it to ground in multiple spots. Quietest guitar I've ever played. Got tiny cuts all over my hands from handling the foil though.
 

tysonlt

Inspired
Hmm, when I buy my next guitar I’ll keep that in mind...

I was surprised to see how haphazardly the shielding paint was applied to the factory Les Paul cavity. It was there, but looked very rushed and had huge gaps.

I also remember I’d cut and rejoined the pickup wire to try some new pups, but some of the bare wire was still showing and it would short with the tin foil on the plate... took me weeks to figure out what was going on. Ah, experience...:tearsofjoy:
 

GotMetalBoy

Power User
Got tiny cuts all over my hands from handling the foil though.
You have to use thimbles on your fingers and guitar picks to get in all the little crevices, so you don't cut up your fingers.

Instead of copper foil tape, I've been using HVAC Foil Tape and just fold the seems to keep continuity because the glue isn't very conductive. It's a lot lower price and you can get it at most hardware stores.
 

Rex

Legend!
You have to use thimbles on your fingers and guitar picks to get in all the little crevices, so you don't cut up your fingers.

Instead of copper foil tape, I've been using HVAC Foil Tape and just fold the seems to keep continuity because the glue isn't very conductive. It's a lot lower price and you can get it at most hardware stores.
Yeah, there’s no need to cut your fingers. Just find or fabricate a burnishing tool. You’ll get more even results, too.
 
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Rich G.

Experienced
My main workhorse guitar that I gigged with for probably over 10 years was a Warmoth parts-caster. I lined the control cavity and pickup cavities with copper shielding foil and attached it to ground in multiple spots. Quietest guitar I've ever played. Got tiny cuts all over my hands from handling the foil though.
Quietest guitar I have is a '79 Les Paul Custom. All the pots in the control cavity mount to a metal plate. There's an "ash tray" sort of cover that goes over the top of all that. The 3-Way switch has a metal cup around it as does the input jack.
 

GotMetalBoy

Power User
So if I use an ISP decimator to quieten it down, does it go before or after the modeling unit?
Neither. Put the gate block after the amp block and set the gate block side chain to input. If you're not sure how to do that, let me know and I'll post an example preset.
 

Zedhed

Experienced
The point everyone is making is, Kill the interference at the signal source. Trying to get rid of unwanted noise once it's already been introduced is putting the cart before the horse, the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.

Any 'post' solution is likely going to diminish your tone since cutting noise out of the signal will cut some of the clean signal as well.
 

rrhoads17

Member
The gate in the AxeFx doesn't work well it cuts off my notes and sustain and after I hit a note or chord you can still hear the noise. And I have turned off literally every electrical device in my house. My pickup is picking up electrical noise from the air.
 
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