• We would like to remind our members that this is a privately owned, run and supported forum. You are here at the invitation and discretion of the owners. As such, rules and standards of conduct will be applied that help keep this forum functioning as the owners desire. These include, but are not limited to, removing content and even access to the forum.

    Please give yourself a refresher on the forum rules you agreed to follow when you signed up.

Help!!!!!!

dnasurfer

Regular
I currently having a problem with getting a nice pitch shifter sound:
im using a high gain sound (5150) with reverb/delay chucked in for good measure
but i need a harmony guitar for a certain part of the guitar solo (a 3rd) but when i use the pitch2 block and turn it on- it sounds really muddy...
heres my chain...

WAH-PITCH2- AMP-CAB -DELAY-REVERB

IM USING THE HARMOniZER WITH THE IONIAN SETTING,- THE KEY IS IN A MAJOR

can someone tell me if im doing something wrong???:shock
 

clarky

Axe-Master
you could try using a 2nd amp in parallel with amp1 and placing the pitch shifter [mix=100%] in front of that

so the un-shifted signal goes into amp1 and the shifted signal goes into amp2
and you blend the two signals back together in the cab block
 

boardwlk17

Forum Addict
I have the direct signal going straight through and I run the custom harmony @ 100% in parallel and blend the two.
 

Poparad

Veteran
When using high gain, pitch shifters must go after the amp. Think about it: try playing chords (other than power chords) normally, and listen to how muddy they sound. The sound you're going for is the sound of two separate guitars tracked together, so put the shifter after the amp and it will achieve that effect. I prefer to put it before the cab block, as I like the tone a little better, but that's just me.
 

dnasurfer

Regular
cool

When using high gain, pitch shifters must go after the amp. Think about it: try playing chords (other than power chords) normally, and listen to how muddy they sound. The sound you're going for is the sound of two separate guitars tracked together, so put the shifter after the amp and it will achieve that effect. I prefer to put it before the cab block, as I like the tone a little better, but that's just me.
thats a big help- im going to try it tonite


thanks for all the help
 

Poparad

Veteran
When the pitch shifter is after the cab, it's also shifting the EQ qualities of the cab, and thus the shifted note will sound like it's coming through a slightly different cab. Putting it before keeps the cab fixed, while only shifting the note from the amp.

I suppose the most exacting way to do it would be to run the pitch shifter in parallel to your dry signal, running the dry signal into one amp and the output of the pitch shifter into another amp (preferably the same), and then run both into the same cab. However, I think at this point you might be reaching a point of diminishing returns. Plus it eats up a second amp block and clutters up the signal path a little more.
 

reclavea

Forum Addict
When the pitch shifter is after the cab, it's also shifting the EQ qualities of the cab, and thus the shifted note will sound like it's coming through a slightly different cab. Putting it before keeps the cab fixed, while only shifting the note from the amp...........
After the amp.....seems like it would also be shifting the qualities of the amp as well.

There may be specific benefits to both methods.....before amp or before cab.
 

dnasurfer

Regular
When using high gain, pitch shifters must go after the amp. Think about it: try playing chords (other than power chords) normally, and listen to how muddy they sound. The sound you're going for is the sound of two separate guitars tracked together, so put the shifter after the amp and it will achieve that effect. I prefer to put it before the cab block, as I like the tone a little better, but that's just me.
I just did as you said- Awesome!!!!!!!!:encouragement: thanks very muh.. works like a treat
 
Top Bottom