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Gary Moore long sustain with FM3

Andy Eagle

Power User
I think that there are two phenomena occurring there:

1) The sustain is increased by the vibrational energy that returns from the speaker to the guitar body. That is what I get with my Bluetooth Speaker: eternal sustain (without harmonics) that can even solve the problem with guitars that have a nasty dead note.

2) When that feedback loop gets saturated, harmonics are produced. That is what normally guitarist mean by "feedback". e.g.: Joe Satraini "Flying in a Blue Dream"
I was talking sustain as feedback is an entirely different thing as you say.
 

Tonedeaf

Experienced
Is this what the Freq Out pedal was made for? I'm a headphone user, so if it does, I'll be interested in getting one.
 

dsimms

Inspired
At 0:42 of this video there is one example of the last time I've used the Bluetooth speaker to get long sustain

I recorded that part in another track at the DAW, while sitting with the speaker between the guitar body and me.

The tricky pat is to run the speaker at the correct volume, not too loud or too soft, because it is very easy to get nasty squeals when the magnet is coupled with the pickups. Just enough volume to transmit the vibrations to the guitar body

Here's Steve Hackett discussing his sustainer equipped Fernandes Les Paul in detail. For those not familiar with Steve, he was Genesis' guitarist through most of their early/Peter Gabriel years when they crafted many great songs like Firth of Fifth. I'm not sure if he used volume or an Ebow to get that sustain in the early days. Great job on that solo in your video.


 
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caballero59

Inspired
It's is remarkable that presets made by much better guitarist than me (and with much better ears) don't sound as good as my own cobbled-together stuff on my guitar with my fingers. I've looked for a Gary Moore tone but #121 Still Blue sound ragged with my playing.
 
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la noise

Power User
At 0:42 of this video there is one example of the last time I've used the Bluetooth speaker to get long sustain

I recorded that part in another track at the DAW, while sitting with the speaker between the guitar body and me.

The tricky pat is to run the speaker at the correct volume, not too loud or too soft, because it is very easy to get nasty squeals when the magnet is coupled with the pickups. Just enough volume to transmit the vibrations to the guitar body


Sweet guitar and nice playing!! :)
 

Greg Ferguson

Fractal Fanatic
Here's Steve Hackett discussing his sustainer equipped Fernandes Les Paul in detail. For those not familiar with Steve, he was Genesis' guitarist through most of their early/Peter Gabriel years when they crafted many great songs like Firth of Fifth. I'm not sure if he used volume or an Ebow to get that sustain in the early days. Great job on that solo in your video.


Well, Hackett used an EBow a lot so I expect that’s what he did. He could sustain until the battery died. (I still have an original one in my old equipment case.)
 

la noise

Power User
Hello friends,

A new user here.

Looking for advice if with FM3 I can achieve long sustain like in Gary Moore solo's in Parisienne Walkways live version.

I watched from youtube, he was just standing close to the cabinet and then he could get that beautiful sustain.

Only play in bedroom, I only connect the unit into 2 monitor speaker desktop 5 inch and sometimes using headphone.

Thanks in advance for the torch

Just a couple of personal thoughts here. The Still Blue preset uses a Marshall 1959 and a JTM45
amp model with a drive pedal in front. It may be worth replacing those with the Slo 100 Lead
amp model, and messing around with the gate on the Input stage. Any kind of gate can have
a tendency to clip the end of your notes and make your sustain seem less than it is. Also, vibrato
in your fretting hand. Creating that energy and "shaking that string" can help a lot to increase
the feel of a sustained note.

I can get some degree of "feedback" with the FM3 and studio monitors, but nothing like you can
get with the kind of volume Gary used live on stage or in the studio.
 

Bill Arsenault

Inspired
It's all about acoustic coupling, i.e., enough volume from your speaker to shake the guitar and vibrate the guitar strings, which excites the pickup which sends that note to the amp, which amplifies it and spews it into the air back to the guitar, which shakes the strings....

The only parts that are difficult about it are knowing your guitar and its pickups well enough to know which is the most resonant, and to know what difference from the speaker will affect your guitar.

Holding a note for 30 seconds is easy, but doing it at will with any note is a different situation. Carlos Santana, after sound check, wanders the stage and marks the spots he can stand that will guarantee his trademark sustain. It's not luck, it's knowing the equipment.

It's not that Gary Moore happened upon some magic thing, it's that he did what others do, he figured out the distances.
Sweet Christ- he clearly said he is playing in a bedroom using an FM3.
There’s not a single thing that is easy about playing and sounding like Carlos or Gary
or everyone would be doing it.
I doubt Satch even tries.
Good luck with that one.
 

GitGuy513

Inspired
Sustainiac is a modeler’s best friend for those who were use to getting different order sustained feedback out of a traditIonal guitar amp. I had mastered it at reasonable volumes and was one of the things that made me poo poo modelers until a few months ago when I got the FM3 and played a recently acquired Schecter w/Sustainiac. Tons of fun!! I suppose it won’t completely replace “natural” feedback. I quote that because it really is natural feedback just induced slightly differently. I should also add that the FM3 will never replace a quality tube amp with perfect speakers at its sweet spot either, but everything is a compromise or delicate balance anyway.
 

Greg Ferguson

Fractal Fanatic
Sweet Christ- he clearly said he is playing in a bedroom using an FM3.
There’s not a single thing that is easy about playing and sounding like Carlos or Gary
or everyone would be doing it.
I doubt Satch even tries.
Good luck with that one.
Nobody said that playing like Santana is easy. There’s a big difference between standing in the right spot, hitting a note and holding it versus playing like someone. Knowing the basics of what Santana does is just the starting point.

An FM3 in a bedroom isn’t the issue, it’s moving sufficient air to vibrate the strings. It’s not going to happen at a quiet conversation level but it doesn’t take concert volume levels either.
 

sprint

Fractal Fanatic
I use a digitech freqout
pedal - not perfect particularly if I try to bend while the pedal is generating sustain (warbles) but good enough for the odd time I want it playing at low volume in home music room. I tried sustaniac but hated the complexity it created in my guitar electronics (I've come to prefer as few guitar mods as possible), and I had an ebow for a while and did not take to it.

On occaision, I'll be playing along at low volume (actually I always play at low volume🙁) and find a beautifully long sustaining note without much coaxing or any special processing - never made a big effort to isolate/identify the circumstances that allow for that at low volume but it is in there sometimes. Some presets I've seen posted here can generate feedback but for me it depends on how much cpu I want to spend on it. A CPU inexpensive method I've had some success with is to just move my wah pedal (wah block) to about 1/2 way (seems to boost the good frequencies to get sustain going). Also, if I set up a little louder but still at reasonable volume for at home, and I just touch my guitar headstock lightly againt my monitor/speaker cab, the vibration is enough to get continuous sustain going. For all these options, all gates are off.

Recently, I seem to be gassing for more natural sustain on short notes/between lead line notes - fiddling with compressors, guitar setup, different string guages / amp settings to reduce the speed of note decay but in a very natural sounding way at low volume. When I catch that sustaining vibe exactly, it's very addictive, but sometimes I come back the next day with the same settings / no changes and, poof, it's gone. Some of these things are definitely a challenge for we low volume players but on the other hand things have come a long long way in recent years.
 

Greg Ferguson

Fractal Fanatic
Recently, I seem to be gassing for more natural sustain on short notes/between lead line notes - fiddling with compressors, guitar setup, different string guages / amp settings to reduce the speed of note decay but in a very natural sounding way at low volume. When I catch that sustaining vibe exactly, it's very addictive, but sometimes I come back the next day with the same settings / no changes and, poof, it's gone. Some of these things are definitely a challenge for we low volume players but on the other hand things have come a long long way in recent years.

Look into Jack Pearson. He plays at fairly low volume but can sustain for days. It's partly his guitar choice, the amp, his positioning and then there's his hands because he gets amazing sustain even when playing unplugged.


He's playing slide in this on a flying V and still gets the sustain.

 

favance

Power User
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sprint

Fractal Fanatic
Look into Jack Pearson. He plays at fairly low volume but can sustain for days. It's partly his guitar choice, the amp, his positioning and then there's his hands because he gets amazing sustain even when playing unplugged.


He's playing slide in this on a flying V and still gets the sustain.

Wow - OP - check out the second video at 8:12 - sustains a note for 30+ seconds.

Technique is a big part of it as you say - probably where a gear head like me should be spending more of my time lol!
 
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