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Friedman ASC 12 question

Discussion in 'Axe-Fx II Discussion' started by GuitarGuy5150, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. GuitarGuy5150

    GuitarGuy5150
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    Im new to the axe fx world and I’ve recnetly purchased a Axe fx II XL and a Friedman asc 12. I haven’t started creating my own patches yet and only have been playing around with the factory ones. My tone sounds very bass heavy, any suggestions on how to clean that up? Anyone useing the Friedman? Are you using a global eq?
     
  2. Tahoebrian5

    Tahoebrian5
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    Low cut in the cab block. Anywhere from 90-200hz is common. I would also suggest hi cut between 5-8k. This should get ya going.

    If it is ALL the patches, you could make sure the low cut in the ASC is enabled, and beyond that set your global eq.

    It could also be your guitar making mud. If this is the case you will want to low cut before the amp or try another guitar
     
    scottp likes this.
  3. #3 blearyeyes, Dec 6, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018
    blearyeyes

    blearyeyes
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    Be sure you are not running a CAB in the AXE and a CAB emulation in your speaker if it has that. There is a resonant bump in the low end in a guitar speaker and if you run two cab emulations it will create a lot of low end. Use good headphones directly out of the AXE as a reference to figure out if the AXE patch is bass heavy or if it is the amp/speaker that you are using.
     
  4. GuitarGuy5150

    GuitarGuy5150
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    Thanks the low cut in the cab block helped a lot. I am new to this, any other tips that could help a beginner out?
     
  5. lqdsnddist

    lqdsnddist
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    ASM12 is a little bass heavy but overall pretty much “what goes in is what comes out” accurate reproduction, over a wide frequency range. Can go lower than typical guitar speaker cabinets.

    To sound more “natural” you cut out some of the real lows and often the extreme highs. I use 100hz and 6000hz. This is a closer match to the range we hear from guitar speakers.

    If after doing that, it’s still a little muddy, then turn down the bass on your preset etc, it sounds muddy becasue it is muddy, your ASM is simply revealing a bass heavy patch.

    Also don’t discount the effect your room can have on the tone. 500 watt monitor in a typical untreated bedroom is going to result in some booming bass in certain positions, especially if your monitor is near a wall or corner.

    Overall though it’s a really good and accurate monitor and translates well to house PA’s
     

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