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*FREE* Far-Field Session #2 Cab Pack for Axe-Fx Users

Jason Scott

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Thx as always !!

Will give them a whirl tonight hopefully.

Do you typically use these in conjunction with normal IR’s or as standalone IR’s ?
Either / or, though if you're using them with an FRFR speaker, I'd recommend trying them alone initially.
 

Rekster

Inspired
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We did the best we could given the building and circumstances. There are steel posts that support the roof that were likely the source of the minor reflections. Also the environment was a bit noisy. There's a transformer that was humming. We surrounded it with bags full of foam peanuts in an attempt to reduce the noise.

Statistically they aren't perfect but when we listened to them we were quite pleased.

It's not difficult to obtain a far-field IR. What is difficult is finding a good space. Since we have the building the only cost to us was our time. Since no studio costs were involved we can offer these as free. If they work for you great, if they don't, nothing lost.
I was very interested in experimenting with far-field IR but didn't want to spend any money on it quite yet as I'm still relatively new to Axe FX and still learning so I'm not sure what to expect. Your efforts are appreciated, and then some. Thank you.
 

lscottk

Inspired
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Thanks Cliff and FAS team! I am very grateful for this company and the awesome products you produce. Not to mention your generosity and penchant for constant innovation. You guys rock!

thumb_thank-you-you-rock-thank-you-to-those-who-voted-12009229.png
 

Brownmatthall

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I have an axe 2 and these work? Is there a key component i'm missing out on by not having the 3? Either way I'm kinda glad I got to try these out as I prefer my close-mic IRs for pretty much all of my rhythm sounds. I tried starting from scratch too but as soon as I switch over to my old patches it just immediately feels and sounds better (to me). There is a beautiful amount of detail in lead work with them though, and I'm gonna try clean tones a little later
 

Gizmo

Inspired
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Tried to read through the thread on thegearpage. Interesting, but hurt my brain a bit. So, if the FF IRs are supposed to sound better with FRFR in live situation, would you also send this to FOH? Assuming you had far and near captures of same cab, would you send far to your FRFR monitor and near to FOH? I guess whatever sounds the best should work for both.
 

Paulinfl

Inspired
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Woohoo! Thank you very much FAS! I have been loving JM’s for my setup. Can’t wait to try these! Thanks for yet another III-bee.
 

Corinthian

Regular
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The original intend of Fractal products was to create the perfect tone to tape sound. People began complaining immediately units like the Ultra did not replicate the "amp in the room" sound they sought. Since then, Fractal has been working to also create the live tone people have been requesting, this is one such step toward that end goal.
Not exactly.

The idea of reflection free far-field IRs is that a close mic doesn’t capture much of the sound of the cabinet, just the speaker. So ideally you’d want to mic it up from a couple of metres away where you can hear the whole thing. The problem with that is you’d also pick up a lot of the room reverberation. The solution is to record an IR in a large enough space that you can capture the response before the first reflections arrive.

When you hear a cabinet in person you’re listening to the whole thing, so in a way, yes it’s a step closer to sounding like and amp in the room. But you can also think of it as a more accurate way of capturing the sound of the cabinet, which should sound good in all applications beyond just trying to replicate AITR.
 

AtomicBlaze

Inspired
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Do you recommend aligning the far field cab if used with another cab IR?

Thank you for these cabs I think they sound really good, definitely among the best I have tried. Sounds awesome mixed with my other favorite IR.
 
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REDD

Forum Addict
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Can't wait to try these. On a different note, how can we make it all weekend with the forum being down for maintainance?!?!?!
 

RandyVanMartini

Veteran
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These are sounding pretty good used in moderation, mixed with the IRs I was already using. Very usable.....thanks again Cliff!
 

Corinthian

Regular
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These are sounding pretty good used in moderation, mixed with the IRs I was already using. Very usable.....thanks again Cliff!
FYI, far-field IRs don’t really capture the room reverberation as they aren’t long enough, so there’s no reason they need to be blended with close-miced IRs. They are perfectly useable on their own (in fact many would argue they are better than close-miced IRs).
 

Jason Scott

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FYI, far-field IRs don’t really capture the room reverberation
Ideally they don't, but the vast majority of far field IR's that are currently available include room reflections.

so there’s no reason they need to be blended with close-miced IRs. They are perfectly useable on their own (in fact many would argue they are better than close-miced IRs).
Whether an IR (far field or otherwise) needs to be blended with other IR's or is perfectly usable on its own is a matter of personal preference.
 

skydog

Inspired
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In addition to thanking Fractal Audio offering a cost-free collection for use, I want to also thank those that have commented. I googled various near-field/far-field phrases, to learn more about the concept, but there wasn’t much available. I’m in Germany again, and maybe I’m getting a different filtering of search-results.

I’m one of those characters that send OUT1 to FOH through a cab block, while sending OUT2 to a transparent power amp paired with real cabinets/guitar speakers on-stage.

I don’t know much about IRs, and FRFR units haven’t done it for me. (I guess that my brain needs near field responses from the back of my knees and mid field response from my head. By the way, my head doesn’t like hitting columns either.)

So I was only left with interpreting the terminology, versus information. This thread explained it better for me. I know that it is a cliché statement, but I cannot wait to try them.

Thanks again.

ps. In Germany, I use a Les Paul through a small Katana in the hotel room. I am looking forward to my FM3 go-ahead from Fractal!
 

Corinthian

Regular
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Ideally they don't, but the vast majority of far field IR's that are currently available include room reflections.

Yes, that's true. However, contrary to what seems to be common belief, the reflections manifest themselves more as peaks and nuls in the frequency response than reverberation.

Whether an IR (far field or otherwise) needs to be blended with other IR's or is perfectly usable on its own is a matter of personal preference.
Absolutely. The reason for my post is that based on a lot of posts above I suspect that many people believe a far-field IR will introduce some of the room sound, and therefore you should blend a small amount of them with a close-miced IR. Like you would mics in the studio. But that's not at all how they work.
 
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