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Fletcher-Munson

djidoe

Inspired
Hi guys,

As a starting point, how should I use EQ to boost my mids ?

I understand I should use a bell-type EQ but what is the central frequency to boost ? What Q should I use ? How many db to boost the signal ?

I know a lot of you will say "Use you ear", but what is is your experience ? Just for a starting point.

Many thanx
 

acidfrost

Inspired
Every amps have different "mid" eq knob so a marshall mid is not the same as a fender mid. When you says your mids, what do you want? The mid range is very wide so there's no ways of telling what you want by just saying mids.
 

acidfrost

Inspired
Well you can't get rid of it. You "could" if you play at a specific volume in the same spot all the time.
 

swervedriver

Inspired
Since you're talking about boosting mids, I assume you dialed in your presets at low volume? Going by this, I'd say boost around 3-4 kHz and perhaps a small dip at 1500 Hz. Basically, creating the inverse of those curves. How many dBs you need to boost depends on whatever volumes you're cranking up to.

Personally, I dial in my presets at high volumes (rehearsal/gig volume) and just deal with the slightly compromised sound during bedroom practice. Alternatively, you could create a copy of each preset dialed in for both low- and high-volume situations to get your preferred sound in each case.
 

jakel

Veteran
Personally I prefer to pick an IR that naturally has tame upper mids and highs, and then use high and low pass filters from there if necessary. I try to avoid boosting when possible. Also, reducing the speaker low frequency resonance really helps things stay clean in a loud live mix.
 

dkenin

Inspired
why couldn't we create an algorithm for that FM curve? As the decibels out increase the curve will start to compensate. I won't matter what kind of amp you using as it will just compensate the same across all EQs. I think the issue is translating the knob into loudness, as we've had discussion on here about measure output as a function of loudness, you can't control the sound guy's board either. This is all assuming that the graph above is correct too!
 

brokenvail

Fractal Fanatic
I don't think you can "get rid of it" It is always there, it has to do with how we perceive sound at different volumes. That is the reason why that every one says tweak at gig levels. Tones must be tweaked at the perception level you expect people to hear that at
 

lp59

Veteran
A nice mid-boost from Gamedojo is:
PEQ block after amp and cab
Frequency 770hz
Q 0.35
Gain +4db
Peaking if you use 1 or 2th band
 

Mack

Regular
First of all, I agree with swervedriver, for best results dial in at gig levels. If you do that, you can always use the Global EQ for your quiet practice level.

If your circumstances don't allow tweaking patches at gig levels, I would approach the required gig EQ more as "cutting highs and lows" as opposed to "boosting mids". Boosting mids is cool but it's more of a tone-shaping process.

Mack
 

InsideOut

Forum Addict
First of all, I agree with swervedriver, for best results dial in at gig levels. If you do that, you can always use the Global EQ for your quiet practice level.

If your circumstances don't allow tweaking patches at gig levels, I would approach the required gig EQ more as "cutting highs and lows" as opposed to "boosting mids". Boosting mids is cool but it's more of a tone-shaping process.

Mack
Agree completely! Same goes with recording. Cut muchly, boost minimally. Strong frequency boosts don't sound natural.
 

brokenvail

Fractal Fanatic
First of all, I agree with swervedriver, for best results dial in at gig levels. If you do that, you can always use the Global EQ for your quiet practice level.

If your circumstances don't allow tweaking patches at gig levels, I would approach the required gig EQ more as "cutting highs and lows" as opposed to "boosting mids". Boosting mids is cool but it's more of a tone-shaping process.

Mack
Agree completely! Same goes with recording. Cut muchly, boost minimally. Strong frequency boosts don't sound natural.
+2
 
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