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"Fizz is Good"

Singtall

Experienced
i have an Ultra, but this same fix may apply to the II. i have found this to work with most accurate modelers.

here is my PEQ setting for cab sim fix:

frequency = 1956hz
Q = 0.317
gain = +3.5db

before coming up with this eq setting i was trying to fix the problem like everyone else does, with blocking eq's.....but cutting highs and lows didn't solve the problem, only made it sound muddy/dark. the upper fizz is needed to work in a mix, but adding mids balances it out.

the eleven rack has the same issue, but at a different frequency. adding mids solved most problems.

it's not the units themselves, but the cabinets modeled at close range. our ears want to hear it from a few feet away where the highs are smoothed out.

try adding a PEQ right after your cabinet and use those settings. i would like to know if works the same with the axe-fx II.
 

babuka

Inspired
i have an Ultra, but this same fix may apply to the II. i have found this to work with most accurate modelers.

here is my PEQ setting for cab sim fix:

frequency = 1956hz
Q = 0.317
gain = +3.5db

before coming up with this eq setting i was trying to fix the problem like everyone else does, with blocking eq's.....but cutting highs and lows didn't solve the problem, only made it sound muddy/dark. the upper fizz is needed to work in a mix, but adding mids balances it out.

the eleven rack has the same issue, but at a different frequency. adding mids solved most problems.

it's not the units themselves, but the cabinets modeled at close range. our ears want to hear it from a few feet away where the highs are smoothed out.

try adding a PEQ right after your cabinet and use those settings. i would like to know if works the same with the axe-fx II.
Wouldn't 1956 Hz be considered more low treble or upper mids?
 

Singtall

Experienced
doesn't matter what you want to call it, try the settings and see if it works for you. if not, try sweeping the frequency higher or lower to suit your needs.

i'm using a fairly wide Q, so it effects a bunch of mids....so the presets sound less fizzy without cutting any highs.
 

barhrecords

Axe-Master
I'm not finding this to be true on my Top Boost preset. This amp now seems to be very, very gainy.
I don't think there is a way to undo the taper matching for the controls in V10. So I don't think there would be a way to keep the Drive, Input Trim and Master the same a V9 and achieve the same gain structure.
 

quonsar

Power User
I don't think there is a way to undo the taper matching for the controls in V10. So I don't think there would be a way to keep the Drive, Input Trim and Master the same a V9 and achieve the same gain structure.
Makes sense. Well, I'm just going to do what's recommended and dial her in from scratch.
 

yek

Moderator
Moderator
I don't think there is a way to undo the taper matching for the controls in V10. So I don't think there would be a way to keep the Drive, Input Trim and Master the same a V9 and achieve the same gain structure.
Exactly.
 

quonsar

Power User
Makes sense. Well, I'm just going to do what's recommended and dial her in from scratch.
I reinstalled V10 today and everything simply rocks. My beloved Vox tones right there, only with more response and better feel. Either something had gone weird with my first install or I'm just crazy. The latter seems more likely than the former! :lol
 
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Bodde

Fractal Fanatic
when you hear things at higher volumes [gig / rehearsal] you'll perceive the highs as being stronger so you'll naturally tame them some
so the resultant tone will be smoother but still bright
the Axe though can simulate 'high volume' tones at low volumes.. but because your rig at home isn't knocking walls down you will perceive it a little differently
and this is the reason that I have two banks of presets where the second bank is a copy of the first but is dialled in for high volume usage..
.
Interesting discussion! I have two things to add:
1) what is considered high volume? at what volume does a change occur?
When you play at home or in a home studio you don't need high volume. I thought the Axe was supposed to sound like a recorded version of the actual amp? so how does this relate to high or low volume?
In a home studio you mostly record with low volume but in a 'normal' studio guitars are mostly recorded with higher volume.
2) When I first had the Axe fx I never understood why the Axe fx also 'copied' the bad things from an amp like noise and hiss. Now I understand that that is supposed to be because of a better 'clone sound' of the original amp? I have some mixed feelings about that. Because you don't always want that noise or hiss, especially not at home or when recording.
 

Space Firebird

Inspired
I have played a little trick on you with this clip. One half is the Axe-Fx the other is the actual amp. The controls are set the same.
That's pretty impressive.
I see a lot of folks talk about building their own patches from scratch.
I guess it is said that some companies tend to create presets that are geared towards selling a product more than for actual use by the end user.
What are your thoughts on the factory patches in the Axe FX II?
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
That's pretty impressive.
I see a lot of folks talk about building their own presets from scratch.
I guess it is said that some companies tend to create presets that are geared towards selling a product more than for actual use by the end user.
What are your thoughts on the factory presets in the Axe FX II?
The first bank presets are all intended to be "usable" tones out-of-the-box.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
When I first had the Axe fx I never understood why the Axe fx also 'copied' the bad things from an amp like noise and hiss. Now I understand that that is supposed to be because of a better 'clone sound' of the original amp? I have some mixed feelings about that. Because you don't always want that noise or hiss, especially not at home or when recording.
It doesn't intentionally copy the noise and hiss. Noise is always present. You can't choose to remove it. You can gate it out but that only masks it when you are not playing.

Your guitar has a "self-noise" due to the finite resistance of the pickup windings (sqrt(4KTBR) for you geek types). This self-noise is amplified. The more gain, the more audible it is. The unit itself has self-noise as well but this is usually less than the self-noise of the pickups (assuming your Input Trim is set correctly). You can observe this by turning down the volume pot on your guitar. As you turn it all the way down the noise will decrease since the resistance is being lowered.

The Axe-Fx applies the same amount of gain as the real amp. It has to in order to sound the same. This gain amplifies the noise. Some amps (and the equivalent models) use noise reduction techniques like putting a cap across a plate resistor on one of the intermediate stages. This lessens the apparent noise without significantly changing the tone. Some amps have built-in noise gates.

If you Google "Johnson Noise" you can find out more about self-noise.

Now this is all about "noise". Hum is not noise. It is interference. Hum is solely due to your guitar amplifying incident electromagnetic radiation from nearby AC power.
 

Echophilia

Member
I reinstalled V10 today and everything simply rocks. My beloved Vox tones right there, only with more response and better feel. Either something had gone weird with my first install or I'm just crazy. The latter seems more likely than the former!

I must be crazy too-I did a reinstall a couple days ago and it now sounds AWSOME to my ears?
 

BadMelonFarmer

Power User
Turned to Poltergeist Pig during a jam session for a laugh.... Sounded suprisingly good to jam to.... Thought it would sound hilarious and put the drummer off.
 

Space Firebird

Inspired
It doesn't intentionally copy the noise and hiss. Noise is always present. You can't choose to remove it. You can gate it out but that only masks it when you are not playing...Now this is all about "noise". Hum is not noise. It is interference. Hum is solely due to your guitar amplifying incident electromagnetic radiation from nearby AC power.
Call me silly, but I kinda like noise.
It is an essential tone quality in an authentic guitar/amp relationship.
The instant I plug a guitar into an amp, it comes alive.
Hum has its place as well, IMO.
 
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