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First gig with the FM3 - flawless and epic!

Simon Godden

Inspired
I'm a bit late posting, but gigged with the FM3 10 days ago. My rig was FM3 into Line6 Powercab 212+ on a mix of V30 and Greenback, and the powercab out to the PA. Everything on mono as it's a twin guitar band and I just stick to the left of the stereo field. Guitar was a PRS Custom 24 all night.

I used one preset all night, based on AB's JCM800 Live Gold preset. It sounded epic, no other way to put it. Just as good as when I used to use my AXE III. Tons of compliments from other band members, and the sound guy loved it.

My highlight of the night was playing the first solo in Still In Love With You, the Live and Dangerous version, with the Tape Delay in front of the amp. The feel of it was just spot on and inspirational, even if I was playing the Brian Robertson solo note for note (it's just too good to do anything different).

I can't recommend the Powercab enough - I love the feel of the speaker emulations (not IRs) on stage, it can be damn loud when it needs to be, and the line outs are spot on.

FM3 was great - ever since I stopped using two delays in the same preset, I have had not a single issue with it. Looking forward to that being fixed if possible, but able to live with out it.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
I think he's saying he used the built-in speaker modes and not "user IRs." I don't think he was speaking to the technological means by which they deliver those speaker modes.
Ah, understood.

The way you do these "modes" is that you take an IR of the source speaker and then an IR of the target speaker. Then simply divide the target by the source (in the frequency domain). A crude and less DSP intensive method would be to manually match the frequency response using an equalizer and then storing the equalizer coefficients. You could also do the target/source thing and use something like Prony's method to get a somewhat equivalent IIR filter (which would use less CPU).
 

Simon Godden

Inspired
I think he's saying he used the built-in speaker modes and not "user IRs." I don't think he was speaking to the technological means by which they deliver those speaker modes.
Correct - I don't know the technical implementation method by which they do it, but we are not getting the sonic effect of a close mic'd cab.
 
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