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Famous Musicians You’ve Met?

Freds55

Fractal Fanatic
A friend of mine produced a song for Corey a few months ago. Great song for these times:


@GelnnO
Thank You for sharing this a lot of people need this with all the craziness in the world this year.

What an Awesome song it gave me goose bumps!

Thank you to all of our first responder, Doctors, Nurses, and all of the support personnel that are affected by this craziness.

Hears to a Happy Healthy New Year 2022
🚓🚑🚒🚨🌟✌️🤘🤙😃
 

GitGuy513

Inspired
Met Steve Morse back in the 90’s. The SM Band played a small club in Baltimore MD. After the show he came out to hang and signed autographs and talk. He was totally cool and was joking and probably decompressing a bit. I was so stoked and as a gear geek thought it would be cool to ask him about his rig. All I got was “oh it’s all on the website”. However when he looked up he saw my older brother who is physically the opposite of me. I’m twice his size and he’s a little dude. Anyway, Steve says about my brother ”hey this guy looks like Pete Townshend”! He continued to be very amused about how my brother looked like Pete. So my brother who doesn’t play guitar got a bunch attention from SM.

It was all good, but as some have mentioned that meeting our heroes can be and probably often is a bit deflating. Expectations are a funny thing. Just to reiterate Steve was a totally cool, laid back, friendly and humorous guy.

I have met the guys from old school Kansas. Steve Walsh seemed very anxious to get in the bus. Rich Williams and Robbie Steinhardt (RIP) talked a long time. Attended many PRS Experience Open House’s. Got to meet a good many well known and lesser known, but great players there.
 

mwd

Power User
Worked in a southwest gift shop in New River, AZ (now called Anthem). Was out back smoking and when I came in a co-worker said 'I think there's a famous musician up front'. I walked to front of store and it was Alice Cooper and his family. Was a pleasure to wait on. His daughter was a typical teen, did not want to be shopping with Mom and Dad. She was bored and ready to go...lol.
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
Long time ago (late '70s?), was at Great Adventure in NJ, and they had a free concert for people in the park. I snuck around back and hopped the fence, and was spotted by a guy back stage, wandering around looking like maybe the roadies' manager or something in my imagination (like I'd ever seen a roadie or a manager). Chatted with him for about 5 minutes before the gates opened and some teenie girl came running over to get an autograph from rising star, Andy Gibb. Nice guy. I'd heard his popular song on the radio, but never saw a picture of him before that.

30 years ago yesterday, shook hands and traded guitar pics with B. B. King after his show at The Celebrity Theater in Phoenix....
 

marsonic

Inspired
Do DJs count as musicians to you guys?

If so....I had a press pass to Ultra Music Festival one year. So, there have been a lot of them. Steve Porter was probably the most memorable just because he (somehow) remembered me the second time we met. Paul Oakenfold and Armin van Buuren were also cool. Marcus Schultz was really cool about me having no idea who he was until he went on stage....he was a good sport about me asking him to take a picture of me with Armin before he went on stage. I felt really bad about that one. But, it's really easy to have no idea what a DJ looks like.

The coolest story, though, came from a local show. Mr. C (Richard West), one of the guys who helped create Acid House, played a club here. The after-party involved me trading bottle shots of Stoli for his Marlboro Lights (back when I smoked). That was a really fun night.

If not....disregard.
 

Scented Meat

Power User
My freshman year of college (Spring of 1981) I was in Model UN. Our prof took it very seriously (it was actually a semester-long course) and expected us to win. We stayed at the (then) Statler-Hilton Hotel across 7th Avenue from MSG in NYC. The second night there a major fire occurred in the hotel at around 2 AM and all the guests were evacuated to the Felt Forum in MSG across the street. I recognized an unmistakable voice I'd heard on numerous radio interviews about The Doors. I turned around and cheekily asked him if he'd been to Venice, CA. He had, and confirmed that he was Ray Manzarek. We had a nice chat, mostly about the band he was producing (X). It was surreal.

Two years later I wrote this article about Adrian Belew for our school paper when he brought his band for a concert there in Alumnae Hall. I got to interview him and his bandmates. The editing left much to be desired, but it was a great experience.
page1image6537840
 

mr_fender

Axe-Master
Not many for me. Got Steve Vai's autograph at Guitar Center in Houston years ago. Also met all the guys from the 90's band Fuel after a Houston show back then. They were all pretty cool. Back in college I took a jazz piano class with Dr James Polk, who toured for years with Ray Charles. He was the coolest guy and had a ton of great stories about Ray.
 

Stratoblaster

Fractal Fanatic
Next month is the 40th anniversary of when I met Randy Rhoads the day after the show on the "Diary Of A Madman" tour.

He was extremely cool, humble, soft spoken, and took a lot of time out of his day talking with us. He signed my tour book twice and I've several pictures of all of that.

Two months later he was killed.

I've always maintained that Randy, even though he only recorded two records, was, by far, the most inventive, 'mature', and unique hard rock guitar players of his time. No other 80's hair-metal shredder even came close IMO. Those two records cemented his legacy and are high-water marks of hard rock/metal goodness.

I think of him a lot, and lament that we never got to see where he would have taken things...a true tragedy.

And, I was directly in front of his Marshall stacks, which were only about 15 feet away, and can say that his live tone wasn't anything like his recorded tone (which has been derided ad nausuem throughout the last 4 decades). I'll never forget him playing parts of his main guitar solo staring directly at my friends and I while standing in the front row at stage left (while we absolutely were losing our minds)...a fantastic memory.
 
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Bruce Sokolovic

Power User
I’m in law enforcement by trade. A LONG time ago during a lunch break I had my eye on a PRS C22 anniversary. dropped in at mannys NYC and anyone who knew that store (music row is sadly LONG gone) knew they kept the good stuff in the back room. sales guy plugged the guitar into some kind of Fendery clean whatever and I doodled a bit. Some typical NYC guy stepped in the room and said “wow man, the cops got chops”. It mildly irritated me for a moment and I put the guitar down shorty after. We had a conversation and it turned out to be Jon Paris. Who knew???? He was super cool and invited me to BB Kings to check out the set. Sadly never got the chance to, BB Kings being long gone. Way cool dude.

Typical NYC story.

Came back for the guitar, too.
 

la szum

Fractal Fanatic
Many years ago I played a small club in Enid, Oklahoma. Someone came up to me on the break and said "I really like your guitar playing, is it ok if I sit and talk with you?'. I said sure. I asked him his name and he said Michael Hedges. I asked if he played guitar and he said "yeah, I play a little bit, I am trying to get my own thing together". I was living in Dallas and a couple of years go by and I see Leo Kottke is playing in Dallas on the same bill as Michael Hedges whose first album had just come out. I hadn't heard it yet, but I loved Leo Kotkee so I went to the concert. Well Michael blew everyone away. I went backstage after the concert and he remembered me. I said to him "So you play a little do you? That has to be the understatement of the century". Micheal was born on the same day and year as I was. Michael was a true original.

Wow! By far, Michael, was the best musician I have ever had the privilege to see live. :)

To be honest, I don't think there was even a close second. What a great story
you shared about a true original. He was a virtuoso, and everyone who taps
on their guitar, or uses two hands to play on an acoustic, owes him a massive
debt of gratitude.

So tragic that he passed away in his prime, and he still doesn't receive the credit
he deserves.
 

la szum

Fractal Fanatic
Next month is the 40th anniversary of when I met Randy Rhoads the day after the show on the "Diary Of A Madman" tour.

He was extremely cool, humble, soft spoken, and took a lot of time out of his day talking with us. He signed my tour book twice and I've several pictures of all of that.

Two months later he was killed.

I've always maintained that Randy, even though he only recorded two records, was, by far, the most inventive, 'mature', and unique hard rock guitar players of his time. No other 80's hair-metal shredder even came close IMO. Those two records cemented his legacy and are high-water marks of hard rock/metal goodness.

I think of him a lot, and lament that we never got to see where he would have taken things...a true tragedy.

And, I was directly in front of his Marshall stacks, which were only about 15 feet away, and can say that his live tone wasn't anything like his recorded tone (which has been derided ad nausuem throughout the last 4 decades). I'll never forget him playing parts of his main guitar solo staring directly at my friends and I while standing in the front row at stage left (while we absolutely were losing our minds)...a fantastic memory.

Winner!!

That must have hit hard, especially after meeting him.

I don't think there is a rock star death or passing (maybe Chris Cornell) that hit me
harder than when Randy passed.

Just my conjecture, but I think he was too authentic and nice of an human being to endure
the rock star show for long. Wasn't there word of him quitting Ozzy and going back to school
to get a degree in Classical Guitar??

Thanks for sharing such a great story.
 

sprint

Fractal Fanatic
Haha! I'll see your Anne Murray, and raise you an Helen Reddy. :)
We must bring our total musical souls into the light! - I am an Anne Murray fan and stood in line for 1 hour for her to sign my book - she looked directly into my eyes and asked my name - OMG! a Canadian dream fulfilled - I also listen to Helen Reddy, Carole King, The Carpenters, Dwight Yoakam and Gino Vanelli - on a regular basis - there - I said it - I'm out! - I feel so free
 
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RevDrucifer

Power User
I’ve met the majority of my big influences and a ton of others (like @Bruce Sokolovic showed, NAMM can get nuts) that the only person I’d be excited about meeting now is Gilmour. I never even remember them all when I try to list them, especially after going to NAMM.

Highlights-

Steve Vai- he was the first and it was when I was 16 or 17, at the height of my Vai fanboyism on the Ultra Zone tour. I was waiting outside Irving Plaza and a cab pulled up, I saw a bunch of red and brown hair and then he popped out, I squeaked like a schoolgirl and did the punisher thing; ran up to him immediately just gushing. Ugh. I had a setlist (which he wasn’t exactly thrilled to see) but no pen, so he said “Don’t worry, I’ll pop out in a bit.” About 30 minutes later he was in the lobby and I walked in to get a picture with him (had a pen at that point). I thought he was going to be so much taller than he was! I said “I’m standing next to God right now!”, he chuckled and said quietly, “No no, that’s not me.” That was a really important day for me because I realized how human he was and the whole adoration for celebrities vanished for me after that. More importantly, it made me realize he was just another dude who played like he does because that’s what he set out to do, not because he’s some mythical being with special powers. That was rather profound.

All the Dream Theater guys; I went to both Roseland shows on the SFAM tour and met them before and after the gig standing behind the venue. I was the last guy standing outside the bus when Portnoy was getting ready to turn in for the night when he looked around and saw me, goes “Hey man, you have a ride home?” (I was 17) I still wonder now what he would have said if I told him “No”. :D

Dug Pinnick at NAMM- I was at the Dean NAMM Jam getting drinks before the doors opened at The Grove, I turned around and there was Dug. My ex had no clue who he was, but she had been rocking the Dogman cd for months at that point. SUCH A NICE DUDE!! I bought him a couple drinks (Dug likes LIT’s) and we shot the shit for a few minutes, cracking some jokes about my age and his as I’m just under half his age. We said our goodbyes and then as we were waiting for the show to start he came right up to me and said “Oh, we’re gonna watch the show together!”. I was pretty lit at that point and I was a big fan of Hellyeah’s first album (it WAS my party days after all) so I was screaming along with every word not giving a shit, Dug was cracking up and when I apologized for it he said “No no! You’re all good!” I ran into him the next night at the Hilton and he asked how my throat was that day.

Saturday night of NAMM weekend at the Hilton is a crazy experience, one of the most surreal experiences of my life. You’re just drinking with all the attendees like it’s nothin’.

Devin Townsend- Met him before he was going for a jog and he’s just such a great dude. Told him where some plant-based restaurants were in the area and we talked about setting deadlines to help battle never-ending mixing/recording sessions. He was just so casual and friendly.

Brann and Troy from Mastodon- I first met Brann in Boston a few months prior, he was at the merch booth just shaking fan’s hands and he was BEAT. His eyes were barely open and not cuz he just got high, you could tell he was just tired as hell. Really, really nice dude. Walking out of the Ibanez booth at NAMM he was standing right there so I started talking to him and told him I noticed how tired he was in Boston and thanked him for putting that much effort into his job, he apologized! After 5-10 minutes of talking, it was hitting that awkrward point where you don’t know what to say anymore so I told him “Well man, I’m sure you’ve got plenty of things to do…..” and he cheerfully said “Nope! I’m just hangin out, you come to these often?” and just kept the conversation going. Such a cool fuckin’ dude. I was on the same smoking schedule as Troy and talked to him quite a bit behind the Expo center, funny dude and very courteous. I ran into Bill looking at some kid’s guitars and I jokingly said “Looking for a new endorsement?”, he thought I was serious, turned to me and very solemnly said “No, I’m with Gibson already.” I laughed and told him I was aware of that and I was a fan, not someone trying to sell him something. He seemed a bit quiet so I didn’t spend much time with him.

Kenny G. spilled my beer rushing past me and didn’t even stop to apologize. I stood there kind of perplexed that someone would just do that without at least turning to say “Sorry!”, the woman next to me goes “DO YOU KNOW WHO THAT WAS?!”, I shook my head, “KENNY G! I CAN’T BELIEVE HE JUST WALKED PAST ME!”, not being the biggest fan of his music or that ‘interaction’, I just said “Kenny G owes me a fuckin’ beer” and walked away. :D

That NAMM weekend really kind of wiped my memory after meeting so many people, I have to look at pictures now to remember them all. When I was in high school the venue everyone played at in Lewiston, ME was a 3 minute walk from my apartment, so I used to hang out hours before the show and after to meet people as they were coming off/getting on their busses. My biggest regret was not hanging out after a Pantera concert. I walked around the busses for a minute after, saw Phil walking around so I stood by the bus but he never came out. Never even saw Dime/Vinnie’s bus open up. Really wish I waited that night. 3 years later Dime was gone. Buckethead was a funny one; he was coming out of the venue as Maine was getting it’s first snowfall, I ran up to him “BUCKETHEAD! BUCKETHEAD! BUCKETHEAD!” and turned the corner of the bus with just enough time for the door to close in my face.

After the 2001 Boston G3 show a bunch of people were putting road cones at the exit of the venue, a dick move really, but it got Satch to come out and take pics with all of us. They were watching porn on the bus. :D
 

Bruce Sokolovic

Power User
I’ve met the majority of my big influences and a ton of others (like @Bruce Sokolovic showed, NAMM can get nuts) that the only person I’d be excited about meeting now is Gilmour. I never even remember them all when I try to list them, especially after going to NAMM.

Highlights-

Steve Vai- he was the first and it was when I was 16 or 17, at the height of my Vai fanboyism on the Ultra Zone tour. I was waiting outside Irving Plaza and a cab pulled up, I saw a bunch of red and brown hair and then he popped out, I squeaked like a schoolgirl and did the punisher thing; ran up to him immediately just gushing. Ugh. I had a setlist (which he wasn’t exactly thrilled to see) but no pen, so he said “Don’t worry, I’ll pop out in a bit.” About 30 minutes later he was in the lobby and I walked in to get a picture with him (had a pen at that point). I thought he was going to be so much taller than he was! I said “I’m standing next to God right now!”, he chuckled and said quietly, “No no, that’s not me.” That was a really important day for me because I realized how human he was and the whole adoration for celebrities vanished for me after that. More importantly, it made me realize he was just another dude who played like he does because that’s what he set out to do, not because he’s some mythical being with special powers. That was rather profound.

All the Dream Theater guys; I went to both Roseland shows on the SFAM tour and met them before and after the gig standing behind the venue. I was the last guy standing outside the bus when Portnoy was getting ready to turn in for the night when he looked around and saw me, goes “Hey man, you have a ride home?” (I was 17) I still wonder now what he would have said if I told him “No”. :D

Dug Pinnick at NAMM- I was at the Dean NAMM Jam getting drinks before the doors opened at The Grove, I turned around and there was Dug. My ex had no clue who he was, but she had been rocking the Dogman cd for months at that point. SUCH A NICE DUDE!! I bought him a couple drinks (Dug likes LIT’s) and we shot the shit for a few minutes, cracking some jokes about my age and his as I’m just under half his age. We said our goodbyes and then as we were waiting for the show to start he came right up to me and said “Oh, we’re gonna watch the show together!”. I was pretty lit at that point and I was a big fan of Hellyeah’s first album (it WAS my party days after all) so I was screaming along with every word not giving a shit, Dug was cracking up and when I apologized for it he said “No no! You’re all good!” I ran into him the next night at the Hilton and he asked how my throat was that day.

Saturday night of NAMM weekend at the Hilton is a crazy experience, one of the most surreal experiences of my life. You’re just drinking with all the attendees like it’s nothin’.

Devin Townsend- Met him before he was going for a jog and he’s just such a great dude. Told him where some plant-based restaurants were in the area and we talked about setting deadlines to help battle never-ending mixing/recording sessions. He was just so casual and friendly.

Brann and Troy from Mastodon- I first met Brann in Boston a few months prior, he was at the merch booth just shaking fan’s hands and he was BEAT. His eyes were barely open and not cuz he just got high, you could tell he was just tired as hell. Really, really nice dude. Walking out of the Ibanez booth at NAMM he was standing right there so I started talking to him and told him I noticed how tired he was in Boston and thanked him for putting that much effort into his job, he apologized! After 5-10 minutes of talking, it was hitting that awkrward point where you don’t know what to say anymore so I told him “Well man, I’m sure you’ve got plenty of things to do…..” and he cheerfully said “Nope! I’m just hangin out, you come to these often?” and just kept the conversation going. Such a cool fuckin’ dude. I was on the same smoking schedule as Troy and talked to him quite a bit behind the Expo center, funny dude and very courteous. I ran into Bill looking at some kid’s guitars and I jokingly said “Looking for a new endorsement?”, he thought I was serious, turned to me and very solemnly said “No, I’m with Gibson already.” I laughed and told him I was aware of that and I was a fan, not someone trying to sell him something. He seemed a bit quiet so I didn’t spend much time with him.

Kenny G. spilled my beer rushing past me and didn’t even stop to apologize. I stood there kind of perplexed that someone would just do that without at least turning to say “Sorry!”, the woman next to me goes “DO YOU KNOW WHO THAT WAS?!”, I shook my head, “KENNY G! I CAN’T BELIEVE HE JUST WALKED PAST ME!”, not being the biggest fan of his music or that ‘interaction’, I just said “Kenny G owes me a fuckin’ beer” and walked away. :D

That NAMM weekend really kind of wiped my memory after meeting so many people, I have to look at pictures now to remember them all. When I was in high school the venue everyone played at in Lewiston, ME was a 3 minute walk from my apartment, so I used to hang out hours before the show and after to meet people as they were coming off/getting on their busses. My biggest regret was not hanging out after a Pantera concert. I walked around the busses for a minute after, saw Phil walking around so I stood by the bus but he never came out. Never even saw Dime/Vinnie’s bus open up. Really wish I waited that night. 3 years later Dime was gone. Buckethead was a funny one; he was coming out of the venue as Maine was getting it’s first snowfall, I ran up to him “BUCKETHEAD! BUCKETHEAD! BUCKETHEAD!” and turned the corner of the bus with just enough time for the door to close in my face.

After the 2001 Boston G3 show a bunch of people were putting road cones at the exit of the venue, a dick move really, but it got Satch to come out and take pics with all of us. They were watching porn on the bus. :D
Everyone owes themselves at least one NAMM trip in their lifetime. Ive made the last 7!
 

Bruce Sokolovic

Power User
This guy here, if you know you know. Another piece of what was great about NYC gone.
 

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TD77

Inspired
Next month is the 40th anniversary of when I met Randy Rhoads the day after the show on the "Diary Of A Madman" tour.

He was extremely cool, humble, soft spoken, and took a lot of time out of his day talking with us. He signed my tour book twice and I've several pictures of all of that.

Two months later he was killed.

I've always maintained that Randy, even though he only recorded two records, was, by far, the most inventive, 'mature', and unique hard rock guitar players of his time. No other 80's hair-metal shredder even came close IMO. Those two records cemented his legacy and are high-water marks of hard rock/metal goodness.

I think of him a lot, and lament that we never got to see where he would have taken things...a true tragedy.

And, I was directly in front of his Marshall stacks, which were only about 15 feet away, and can say that his live tone wasn't anything like his recorded tone (which has been derided ad nausuem throughout the last 4 decades). I'll never forget him playing parts of his main guitar solo staring directly at my friends and I while standing in the front row at stage left (while we absolutely were losing our minds)...a fantastic memory.
WOW! That is amazing. Agree with you on his mark on the guitar. Guy was ridiculous. I may have said this here in another thread or maybe it was somewhere else but…..has anyone else noticed that some of the most ferocious and devastating guitarists are also the most quiet, unassuming and shy people? It’s a strange thing and doesn’t add up in a way. lol.
 
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