EBMM JP Bridge Removal?

Discussion in 'Bass & Other Instruments' started by Etudica, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. Etudica

    Etudica
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    I'm going to need to replace a piezo saddle in one of mine on my own since it's out of warranty, and I don't trust shipping my guitars anywhere anymore (both UPS and Fedex have damaged mine multiple times in transit).

    So, has anyone removed their bridge completely and could offer some basic steps/tips? It seems the piezo lead to the preamp needs to be unsoldered in order to remove the bridge enough to get at the piezo harness. Impossible to find any DIYs online.
     
  2. selta

    selta
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    Wrong sub-forum most likely.
    In most cases, unless using a screw terminal, removing the piezo from the buffer in the control cavity will make your life much easier. If you're not electrically inclined, take a photo of it before you do anything.

    Which JP is it? I'd seek out a wiring diagram before starting.

    Have you sourced the replacement saddle already? I'm not sure which ones EBMM uses. I'd also look over any information the manufacturer offers before starting.
     
  3. Etudica

    Etudica
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    I actually just pulled the preamp and the lead going through the trem from the piezo is not soldered in the preamp. It's a 2 wire connector and the hole in the cavity it routes through appears to be large enough to accommodate the end connector for removal of bridge. So that answers my own question. Since it's a floating trem it looks to be just a matter of (1) disconnect piezo from preamp board, (2) remove strings, (3) remove claw springs, and remove carefully.

    It's a JPXI7 made in 2012. I discovered EBMM has since changed the design of the saddles to be more resilient in newer models. The original saddles on mine are no longer available but customer service offered up three options for repair. I opted to swap out all saddles with the newer spec ones. This also requires changing out the preamp for a newer version as well. I'll be purchasing the replacements direct from the factory.
     

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