• We would like to remind our members that this is a privately owned, run and supported forum. You are here at the invitation and discretion of the owners. As such, rules and standards of conduct will be applied that help keep this forum functioning as the owners desire. These include, but are not limited to, removing content and even access to the forum.

    Please give yourself a refresher on the forum rules you agreed to follow when you signed up.

Dumble for sale

I just might need to buy this when I win the lottery next week. Hoyt Axton wrote a song that has plagued me my entire life. When ever I meet someone for the first time they always sing "Jeremiah was a bullfrog" and then they ask me if I know the song.
 
A 73 Strat for 450k! There's probably a sucker lawyer who's going to bye it!

Wow, what did CBS do different to manufacture this gem? I had a 73 Sunburst Strat and sold it for 1200; go figure...
 

chucma

Forum Addict
The Strat is crazy, and the fact that it's a CBS era Strat is mind numbing! I can sort of understand the Dumble being expensive given the legendary status and Howard not being with us anymore, but that Strat is waaaaay out of the park.

Edit: Howard lives!!!
 
Last edited:

guitarnerdswe

Forum Addict
That's like 3x as much as Gilmour's Black Strat is valued at. And that one has been used at a LOT more famous songs then just Sweet Home Alabama. Cultural impact and sheer legend wise this guitar doesn't even come close.
Not to defend the ridiculous price, but Sweet Home Alabama is probably a lot more famous to some people than anything Pink Floyd has ever done. The expose or general appeal of a song like Sweet Home Alabama is quite different compared to progressive or psychedelic rock. So while the average guitar player would probably rather own the black strat, that's not to say someone with too much money who really doesn't care about guitar itself or it's connection with a particular player, but rather just wants something with famous ties just for the pop culture connection, wouldn't rather have the Ed King strat. After all, it's on a song practically everybody knows, and that may be all that matters to some people.
 

dpeterson

Fractal Fanatic
The Strat is crazy, and the fact that it's a CBS era Strat is mind numbing! I can sort of understand the Dumble being expensive given the legendary status and Howard not being with us anymore, but that Strat is waaaaay out of the park.
Dumble died?
 

Muad'zin

Forum Addict
The Strat is crazy, and the fact that it's a CBS era Strat is mind numbing! I can sort of understand the Dumble being expensive given the legendary status and Howard not being with us anymore, but that Strat is waaaaay out of the park.
It's not about the quality of the instrument, it's about the perceived historic value. The guitar that was used to record Sweet Home Alabama. Not some CBS era Strat with magical sound qualities. Like with any guitar that became associated with a famous guitar player or famous song their most important saving grace was that they just happened to be around when the guitar player was looking for one. Think like going to a guitar store and just pick a current factory model or 2nd hand model that just happens to be on offer and which seems nice to you.

Not to defend the ridiculous price, but Sweet Home Alabama is probably a lot more famous to some people than anything Pink Floyd has ever done. The expose or general appeal of a song like Sweet Home Alabama is quite different compared to progressive or psychedelic rock. So while the average guitar player would probably rather own the black strat, that's not to say someone with too much money who really doesn't care about guitar itself or it's connection with a particular player, but rather just wants something with famous ties just for the pop culture connection, wouldn't rather have the Ed King strat. After all, it's on a song practically everybody knows, and that may be all that matters to some people.
So you think that more people know Sweet Home Alabama then all of Pink Floyd's work combined? That albums like Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall pale into insignificance to that one song? That Money, Time and Another Brick in the Wall in no way enjoy near mass recognition? Nor did they ever attend any of the massive stadium tours that Pink Floyd held since the 70's? I also think that you seriously underestimate the average rich buyer interested in this gear. Any serious collector would most likely know what they're buying. Only nouveaux riche with too much money to burn would just buy anything as long as its famous for something. But these days those tend to be either Russian oligarchs and Chinese industrialists. And neither of those have probably ever heard of Sweet Home Alabama. And from what I've heard China in particular is a pop music wasteland.
 
Top Bottom