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Does the output jack need to be replaced after removing some EMG's?

I had paid a guitar repair shop to remove some EMG's (EMG-81 and EMG-SA) from my guitar and install some passive pickups (DiMarzio CrunchLab Bridge and Bare Knuckle Impulse Single Coil).

We are not able to try the guitars out there due to their understandable pandemic precautions but I had noticed the bar on the CrunchLab was facing the bridge and not the neck (it usually faces the neck on all my other guitars).

As soon as I arrived home, I plugged in and it sounded like a single coil (buzzy and thinner than a humbucker) so I went back and I had them reverse the CrunchLab.

Returned home and I found it sounded pretty much the same.

I am assuming something is not wired correctly since the CrunchLab does not sound even close to how it sounds on my other guitars (I realize that PU's can sound pretty different on different guitars but it sounds like a single coil).

Most likely, I will need to take it back next Saturday for inspection and hopefully get it to sound normal to me.

Do they need to replace the output jack on the guitar if it went from EMG's to passive PU's?

I believe there was a new output jack installed when I had the EMG's installed years ago (all of the pots were replaced as well at that time for active PU's).

For this current PU installation, I know they had swapped out the volume/tone pots since I received the old ones in a box, however, there is no output jack with them so I thought I should ask about it here.

Thanks for your time and considerations!!
 

JoKeR III

Fractal Fanatic
I believe the EMGs require a stereo output jack. It can be wired to work with passive pickups but would be worth replacing just to rule out as a cause of the noise/lack of output.
 

scottp

Power User
Usually replacing pickups is an easy job.
I'm surprised you are still having issues with it.
Does that shop even test their work before the guitar goes out the door?
I would be concerned.

Also, if in question a new output jack is inexpensive, have it replaced, if you can trust them.
 

Dimi84

Inspired
Never had the need to change stereo jack back to "regular" one when switching to passives. Stereo jack is to control the battery drain. No need to wire anything on the stereo lug, in my experience.
 
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Andy Eagle

Power User
I had paid a guitar repair shop to remove some EMG's (EMG-81 and EMG-SA) from my guitar and install some passive pickups (DiMarzio CrunchLab Bridge and Bare Knuckle Impulse Single Coil).

We are not able to try the guitars out there due to their understandable pandemic precautions but I had noticed the bar on the CrunchLab was facing the bridge and not the neck (it usually faces the neck on all my other guitars).

As soon as I arrived home, I plugged in and it sounded like a single coil (buzzy and thinner than a humbucker) so I went back and I had them reverse the CrunchLab.

Returned home and I found it sounded pretty much the same.

I am assuming something is not wired correctly since the CrunchLab does not sound even close to how it sounds on my other guitars (I realize that PU's can sound pretty different on different guitars but it sounds like a single coil).

Most likely, I will need to take it back next Saturday for inspection and hopefully get it to sound normal to me.

Do they need to replace the output jack on the guitar if it went from EMG's to passive PU's?

I believe there was a new output jack installed when I had the EMG's installed years ago (all of the pots were replaced as well at that time for active PU's).

For this current PU installation, I know they had swapped out the volume/tone pots since I received the old ones in a box, however, there is no output jack with them so I thought I should ask about it here.

Thanks for your time and considerations!!
No need to swap the jack you just don't use the ring connection ( or connect the ring to earth ). The direction of the pickup is facing won't actually change anything in terms of phase so just put it how you want it. If you have a thin single coil sound it is because it is either wired up wrong or one coil is shorted to on something. There is also the possibility of dry joints or a failed component somewhere. Is the thin sound only there when two pickups are on together or is one pickup just thin all the time? If you get no luck post a picture of the wiring if you can.
 

paranoid

Fractal Fanatic
I would wonder if they are connecting the correct wires in the correct places? Not all pickups use the same color code. As for the trs jack, if it ain't broke it don't need replaced.
 
I believe the EMGs require a stereo output jack. It can be wired to work with passive pickups but would be worth replacing just to rule out as a cause of the noise/lack of output.
I had brought them four guitars for some work/mods and they had just finished all of them except for the PU replacement so I think they might have rushed this last one since I was headed there to get them and they realized all the electronics needed to be changed for passive PU's (they had just taken out the EMG's).

I will ask them about replacing the output jack, thanks.
 
Usually replacing pickups is an easy job.
I'm surprised you are still having issues with it.
Does that shop even test their work before the guitar goes out the door?
I would be concerned.

Also, if in question a new output jack is inexpensive, have it replaced, if you can trust them.
They have done some quality work in the past but the pandemic had increased their workload there by a lot (they said it had more than quadrupled), and I found out the owner who usually does all of the work for me was on vacation during this time so they might have rushed everything to meet my picking everything up deadline.

The main issue for me that would have prevented these issues is their front pickup area is closed off due to the pandemic (they have a small window to pass the guitars to them there now) so we are not able to test out the finished guitars there.

Honestly, I was not expecting them to have it set up this way since I am only able to check the guitars once I get home (almost 2 hours away from there).

And thanks, I think the replacing of the output jack might at least eliminate the possible issue.
 
No need to swap the jack you just don't use the ring connection ( or connect the ring to earth ). The direction of the pickup is facing won't actually change anything in terms of phase so just put it how you want it. If you have a thin single coil sound it is because it is either wired up wrong or one coil is shorted to on something. There is also the possibility of dry joints or a failed component somewhere. Is the thin sound only there when two pickups are on together or is one pickup just thin all the time? If you get no luck post a picture of the wiring if you can.
Thank you for the information.

They emailed me to let me know they can look it over for me and fix/adjust anything wrong there.

The information each of you provided will provide me with questions for them as well so thank you for providing it for me :)
 

JoKeR III

Fractal Fanatic
I had brought them four guitars for some work/mods and they had just finished all of them except for the PU replacement so I think they might have rushed this last one since I was headed there to get them and they realized all the electronics needed to be changed for passive PU's (they had just taken out the EMG's).

I will ask them about replacing the output jack, thanks.
As others have pointed out, the stereo jack will work as long as it's wired correctly but when solving issues I like to rule things out. The other thing I would check, again as has been mentioned, is the ground. If you have an ohmmeter, or multimeter that has a resistance/continuity setting, touch the bridge of the guitar with one lead and the nut/shaft of a volume/tone control with the other. A reading above 10 ohms will more than likely mean you have a grounding issue and could cause the symptoms you're describing.

Brief story; I had a PRS CE24 that sounded okay but didn't blow me away; was very weak sounding. Was replacing a switch and had just learned about creating a solid ground in a guitar's circuit. This guitar had the conductive paint in the cavity so I checked the ground and it showed resistance in the circuit (don't recall the reading but wasn't excessive). I put a piece of copper tape in the cavity that covered all of the holes for the pots and switch and installed the new switch, using only one pot for ground wires. I checked the resistance again and it registered zero resistance. Plugged the guitar in and the difference was night and day. Much more volume and fullness, more like what I expected in the first place with a PRS.
 
As others have pointed out, the stereo jack will work as long as it's wired correctly but when solving issues I like to rule things out. The other thing I would check, again as has been mentioned, is the ground. If you have an ohmmeter, or multimeter that has a resistance/continuity setting, touch the bridge of the guitar with one lead and the nut/shaft of a volume/tone control with the other. A reading above 10 ohms will more than likely mean you have a grounding issue and could cause the symptoms you're describing.

Brief story; I had a PRS CE24 that sounded okay but didn't blow me away; was very weak sounding. Was replacing a switch and had just learned about creating a solid ground in a guitar's circuit. This guitar had the conductive paint in the cavity so I checked the ground and it showed resistance in the circuit (don't recall the reading but wasn't excessive). I put a piece of copper tape in the cavity that covered all of the holes for the pots and switch and installed the new switch, using only one pot for ground wires. I checked the resistance again and it registered zero resistance. Plugged the guitar in and the difference was night and day. Much more volume and fullness, more like what I expected in the first place with a PRS.
I will check to see if my ohmmeter has it, and then check.

Thanks again for the suggestions/advice!!
 

Andy Eagle

Power User
As others have pointed out, the stereo jack will work as long as it's wired correctly but when solving issues I like to rule things out. The other thing I would check, again as has been mentioned, is the ground. If you have an ohmmeter, or multimeter that has a resistance/continuity setting, touch the bridge of the guitar with one lead and the nut/shaft of a volume/tone control with the other. A reading above 10 ohms will more than likely mean you have a grounding issue and could cause the symptoms you're describing.

Brief story; I had a PRS CE24 that sounded okay but didn't blow me away; was very weak sounding. Was replacing a switch and had just learned about creating a solid ground in a guitar's circuit. This guitar had the conductive paint in the cavity so I checked the ground and it showed resistance in the circuit (don't recall the reading but wasn't excessive). I put a piece of copper tape in the cavity that covered all of the holes for the pots and switch and installed the new switch, using only one pot for ground wires. I checked the resistance again and it registered zero resistance. Plugged the guitar in and the difference was night and day. Much more volume and fullness, more like what I expected in the first place with a PRS.
You actually fixed a partial short . There will always be resistance in graphite paint but it won't make any difference as long as it is not shorting hot. The audio signal does not pass through the screening but the screening is also connected to the central ground point (ideal the back of the vol pot0. A guitar with no cavity screening at all can be just as quiet as one with full copper tape by simply using screened cable for the signal path.In fact this is better.
 

Andy Eagle

Power User
Most switches have unused terminals and other ways of using them so a spare terminal on the jack should be of no concern. A mistake here would give you no signal at all or a loud hum with nothing else.
 
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