• We would like to remind our members that this is a privately owned, run and supported forum. You are here at the invitation and discretion of the owners. As such, rules and standards of conduct will be applied that help keep this forum functioning as the owners desire. These include, but are not limited to, removing content and even access to the forum.

    Please give yourself a refresher on the forum rules you agreed to follow when you signed up.

Correct Use of the RTA Block

deakle

Inspired
The Real Time Analyzer block in my mind is extremely useful. However, I want to be sure that I am using it correctly and to its fullest potential. The way I use it is in conjunction with a Parametric EQ block and then I make adjustments with the PEQ so that the visible curve on the RTA is as "smooth" as possible with no sharp peaks or valleys. Am I getting it right? Is there anything that I am missing? I am an old guy and the Axe III is way more sophisticated than the old 50 watt Marshall heads we used to use back in the day. Thanks for any and all comments!
 

deakle

Inspired
Why would you want/do that? Sound is made up of valleys and curves. A perfect curve is boring and makes everything sound the same.
That is what I am driving at. Am I thinking about this wrong? @FractalAudio Cliff, what do you think? Can you chime in please? I want to make sure I utilize this to its fullest potential and that I do not use it incorrectly.
 

deakle

Inspired
Why would you want/do that? Sound is made up of valleys and curves. A perfect curve is boring and makes everything sound the same.
And thank you for your comment @yek I place a high value on your thoughts as you are very knowledgeable.
 

elegost

Member
I use it to dial in my EQs. Like, if there's a frequency feeding back i can see it as a peak in the RTA and then highlight it to get the specific frequency, to dial out in my eq block.
 

h.c.e.

Power User
I too just use it as a guide post to problem areas only when the crop up. Like the other day I had a preset that with my Gretsch on the neck pickup was getting a really woofy thing that was distracting from an otherwise okay sound. Using the RTA block I noticed I as getting a pretty excited bit of something in the Bass range that I suspected was probably this "woof" i was reacting to, so using the Value knob I was able to scroll across and see these over excited looking bands were around around the 200ish Hz range, so I stuck in a parametric EQ after the Cab block brought down 200 Hz a few db, narrowed the Q a bit, and everything smoothed out and cut through alot better. Without having to do a guess and check hunt with a graphic EQ, or just defaulting to going "moar" on the low cut in the cab, I was able to pull out just the problem frequency out, and the RTA block let me quickly visualize that problem band in just a few seconds.
 

deakle

Inspired
I wouldn't use it to flatten a response. That will remove all the character. Use it to identify problem frequencies or as a spiffy screen saver.
Thanks @FractalAudio Cliff! If I am correct, problem frequencies would show up as being much, much higher or much, much lower? In other words, they would kind of “stand out” from the other frequencies?
 

yek

Moderator
Moderator
You worry too much. :)

Only adjust frequencies when you find them annoying when listening. Don’t edit purely based op visuals.
 

lqdsnddist

Axe-Master
Thanks @FractalAudio Cliff! If I am correct, problem frequencies would show up as being much, much higher or much, much lower? In other words, they would kind of “stand out” from the other frequencies?
That would only be a problem if you think it sounds subjectively bad. Having certain frequencies stand out or being cut might be exactly what you want.

Simply trust your ears, if it sounds good, then it is good.

You can’t really judge how soemthing sounds with your eyes anymore than you can tell how soemthing smells by liking it.

Food is meant to be tasted/smelled so enjoy with your nose and mouth. Music is meant to be heard so use your ears
 

kisslorand

Experienced
I used RTA to verify my calculations of the Delay time in the CAB block. Very useful to see what does the Delay Time parameter in the CAB block. Feed the CAB block with Pink Noise and play with the Delay Time. To see this in real time you have to use AxeEdit III and make adjustments on the PC and watch the RTA on the AxeFX or vice versa.
 

kisslorand

Experienced
Hmmmm... It would be harder to select from which block on the grid to take the signal if you have a crowded (with non-empty blocks) preset.
...or maybe not: Row X, Column Y
 

Tommy Tempest

Experienced
Opinion taken from a long time Sound Engineer:
RTA is good for getting rid of feedback in a room. I would never use it for an instrument. For those I use my ears and common sense. Also using an RTA improperly can flatten the sound where all the life is gone because it sucked the peaks, valleys and dynamics out.
So crank your volume, walk around the room and listen to your guitar with your ears to find your sweet spot.

i do like the RTA graphic. I just wish it could be the default screen when playing live, for all the stoners out front..
 
Top Bottom