• We would like to remind our members that this is a privately owned, run and supported forum. You are here at the invitation and discretion of the owners. As such, rules and standards of conduct will be applied that help keep this forum functioning as the owners desire. These include, but are not limited to, removing content and even access to the forum.

    Please give yourself a refresher on the forum rules you agreed to follow when you signed up.

Compressor Block: confused by makeup function

kartman

Inspired
Sorry for being dense...Still learning. :) I've read a bunch of the wiki stuff but, unless I missed it, I don't remember much about makeup.

I've been doing a lot of messing with COMP block on my Fender clean preset. The block is at the start of the chain and set to STUDIO. If I have 'makeup' activated and the threshold set to where I'm actually seeing the gain dB rolling off when playing, there is a buzzing happening. It goes away if I disconnect the guitar or lower the threshold but gate adjustments are not having any effect.

is the makeup activated or deactivate in "normal" studio compressor use? I'm trying to get more sustain so the assumption I'm making is that I need to find a threshold where the dB meter is showing some attenuation. Otherwise, the block isn't doing anything, right?

Just looking to be pointed in the right direction.

Thanx!
 

B:ASSMASTER

Experienced
Makeup is used to compensate for any volume loss after compression. You could be amplifying some existing buzz already there and it's just more prominent with makeup activated.
 

mr_fender

Fractal Fanatic
Compressors decrease the dynamic range of the signal. By squashing down the peaks above the threshold, they make the output quieter. Makeup gain is applied after the compression to raise the output level back to match the input level. The more compression you apply, either by lower the threshold or raising the compression ratio, the more makeup gain is required to keep the output level the same as the input. Makeup gain boosts the whole signal, so quiet parts are made louder relative the the signal peaks. This adds sustain by making the quiet note decay louder, but also boosts any low level noise that is present in the input signal as well. The more you compress the dynamic range of a signal, the more you raise the noise floor. It's an unfortunate side effect of compression that is largely unavoidable. That's why it's so important to have as clean an input signal as possible by using excellent shielding in your guitar and cables. Overdrive is a form of compression, so it too suffers from the same noise issues as well. That's why high gain sounds can be so much noisier than low gain ones.
 

kartman

Inspired
You could be amplifying some existing buzz already there and it's just more prominent with makeup activated.
I appreciate the response... I trust the quality of the instrument... I have a favourite cable that I always use but I have a few spares about. I'll swap that and see if it cleans up the buzz. As always, this community is the best.

Many thanx.
 

B:ASSMASTER

Experienced
I trust the quality of the instrument
High quality instruments are still susceptible to electronic buzz. Electrical wiring of home, proximity to electrical sources, cable shielding, and ect. are all possible culprits. Hopefully, you can find the problem and eliminate it.
 

kartman

Inspired
High quality instruments are still susceptible to electronic buzz. Electrical wiring of home, proximity to electrical sources, cable shielding, and ect. are all possible culprits. Hopefully, you can find the problem and eliminate it.
I agree... the comment wasn't meant to imply that my instruments weren't capable of being the source of the noise. Your input is well taken. My thought was only that I'd look beyond the guitar itself first. I swapped some cables and double checked the ground on my favourite patch cord. :)

Seems to have helped. I suspect the patch cable ground was marginal. Thanx!
 
Top Bottom