Big Country bagpipe guitar

MSarr

New Member
Hello all, I am the proud owner of a FM3 since yesterday. I am wondering if anyone with a AXEII tone match capability can match the skirling bagpipe guitar tone to the excellent 80s band Big Country? Looking for that tone at 00:55. Thanx :)
 
Check with Simeon, if I’m not mistaken he made an excellent bagpipe preset (albeit many moons ago for the II if memory serves me right).
 
Just looking at the preset on FracTool, it uses two Synth blocks, which is not possible on the FM3.

If the rest of it could be made to work, then you could possibly work around that by using a looper (either a block or separate). You could create a drone first, start the loop, then begin playing.

Again, that's assuming the preset minus the drone portion would work (which at a glance seems like it should).
 
I would just use a short delay with repeats quick, a compressor, some chorus and a clean amp with some mild grit. Dash of reverb. We play this. The scale makes it sound like bagpipes, in a way.
 
Hello all, I am the proud owner of a FM3 since yesterday. I am wondering if anyone with a AXEII tone match capability can match the skirling bagpipe guitar tone to the excellent 80s band Big Country? Looking for that tone at 00:55. Thanx :)

With respect to all the people who were nice enough to respond to you trying to be helpful it never seizes to amaze me how little people in general know, or probably more accurately, care to know about the amazing guitar sounds guitarists from the early '80's like Stewart Adamson from "Big Country" created and how they got their signature sounds. I always thought there was some kind of stigma put on many "new wave/alternative" guitarists from that area that they were just average guitar players with gimmics, guitar synths and overprocessing in the studio which makes me laugh as many of these guitarists would accurately reproduce their amazing studio sounds in live situations with relatively little gear and no guitar synths at all. When I say little gear, it was about the same quantity as the hair bands back then, just used differently and often more progressively.

I'm afraid most of the advice you got here isn't going to help you get that authentic Big Country sound. You should really know the equipment he was using then and his signal path to start with. For one thing, he never used a guitar synth to get that sound or on any of his awesome sounds so using the bagpipe preset someone put on Axechange while being a great preset for what it is, it's not going to get you that sound since no synth was used. And no, he didn't use any chorus or compression either. He used an old MXR Pitch Transposer (pitch shifter) with the pitch shifted an octive or something like that with some detuning for the distinct modulated effect he had. He combined this with some medium modulation delay via Korg SDD2000. He used sold state Fender Showman amps. These were the Fender amps Rivera designed when he was at Fender and are the best sounding solid state amps I've ever heard aside from some modelers, both in their distortion and clean sound. They have a very warm and unique sound both clean and distorted. I wish these amps were modeled in Axe Fx. His distortion came from his amps which have extensive EQing controls. He also used a duel nose gate. This is all he used to get all his great sounds until their third full album where he expanded his sound canvas a bit and added a few modulation fx.

Guitar players from the early '80s don't get nearly the respect and recognition they deserve for their very cool and unique guitar sounds they had.
Stuart Adamson of Big Country, Jamie West Oram of The Fixx, Paul Reynolds of Flock of Seagulls, Charlie Burchill of Simple Minds, etc all had awesome unique signature guitar sounds but I have yet to hear anyone reproduce their sounds accurately with the exception of one guy on youtube that reproduced the Big Country sound but he is a Big Country megafan who has duplicated all of Stewarts gear to the T. All the presets I've heard trying to duplicate these guitar players sounds don't even come close in my opinion. The funny thing is The Edge of U2 came from this stock of guitarists and I'm sure no one would duplicate his sound either had U2 vanished as a group in the lime light in the mid 80's like all these other bands did.
 
Hello all, I am the proud owner of a FM3 since yesterday. I am wondering if anyone with a AXEII tone match capability can match the skirling bagpipe guitar tone to the excellent 80s band Big Country? Looking for that tone at 00:55. Thanx :)

We use to play Big Country and the guitar is not easy. Not shredding, but playing those weird single note runs took me a while. The solo part is fun, but never had a bagpipe sound. Echo, Reverb and Chorus for me.
 
With respect to all the people who were nice enough to respond to you trying to be helpful it never seizes to amaze me how little people in general know, or probably more accurately, care to know about the amazing guitar sounds guitarists from the early '80's like Stewart Adamson from "Big Country" created and how they got their signature sounds. I always thought there was some kind of stigma put on many "new wave/alternative" guitarists from that area that they were just average guitar players with gimmics, guitar synths and overprocessing in the studio which makes me laugh as many of these guitarists would accurately reproduce their amazing studio sounds in live situations with relatively little gear and no guitar synths at all. When I say little gear, it was about the same quantity as the hair bands back then, just used differently and often more progressively.

I'm afraid most of the advice you got here isn't going to help you get that authentic Big Country sound. You should really know the equipment he was using then and his signal path to start with. For one thing, he never used a guitar synth to get that sound or on any of his awesome sounds so using the bagpipe preset someone put on Axechange while being a great preset for what it is, it's not going to get you that sound since no synth was used. And no, he didn't use any chorus or compression either. He used an old MXR Pitch Transposer (pitch shifter) with the pitch shifted an octive or something like that with some detuning for the distinct modulated effect he had. He combined this with some medium modulation delay via Korg SDD2000. He used sold state Fender Showman amps. These were the Fender amps Rivera designed when he was at Fender and are the best sounding solid state amps I've ever heard aside from some modelers, both in their distortion and clean sound. They have a very warm and unique sound both clean and distorted. I wish these amps were modeled in Axe Fx. His distortion came from his amps which have extensive EQing controls. He also used a duel nose gate. This is all he used to get all his great sounds until their third full album where he expanded his sound canvas a bit and added a few modulation fx.

Guitar players from the early '80s don't get nearly the respect and recognition they deserve for their very cool and unique guitar sounds they had.
Stuart Adamson of Big Country, Jamie West Oram of The Fixx, Paul Reynolds of Flock of Seagulls, Charlie Burchill of Simple Minds, etc all had awesome unique signature guitar sounds but I have yet to hear anyone reproduce their sounds accurately with the exception of one guy on youtube that reproduced the Big Country sound but he is a Big Country megafan who has duplicated all of Stewarts gear to the T. All the presets I've heard trying to duplicate these guitar players sounds don't even come close in my opinion. The funny thing is The Edge of U2 came from this stock of guitarists and I'm sure no one would duplicate his sound either had U2 vanished as a group in the lime light in the mid 80's like all these other bands did.
Do you even realize how smug and dismissive you sound?

Granted, you are correct that by all reports the bagpipe tone in question was achieved w/o the use of synths (and definitely no use of modeling). The OP is asking how to achieve the tone though. And guess what? We now have lots of cool tools! Why not use them?!?

BTW, his name was Stuart and not Stewart.
 
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Do you even realize how smug and dismissive you sound?

Granted, you are correct that by all reports the bagpipe tone in question was achieved w/o the use of synths (and definitely no use of modeling). The OP is asking how to achieve the tone though. And guess what? We now have lots of cool tools! Why not use them?!?

BTW, his name was Stuart and not Stewart.
Well pardon me all over the place! Sounds to me like you took it the wrong way. The gentleman was asking how to get the best duplication of the bagpipe-like sound Big Country got on that song, NOT the best literal bagpipe duplication, and it wasn't with a synth. Unintentionally sending him in the wrong direction by answering him with the assumption it was a synth which it was not will end up in frustration and wasting a lot of his time. Did I disrespect those people trying to help him? No I did not. I can't help it if your little feelings were hurt being corrected because you didn't have a clue on how to get the sound he was asking for or bother to do any research on how to get that sound and lazily just referred him to a literal bagpipe recreation with a synth which is not what he was asking for and putting him in the wrong direction. Did I just disrespect you a bit, ya I guess maybe I did.

By the way, you got me on that "Stewart" mistake, I guess that somehow makes me wrong about everything else ha...oh and you right of course! How petty.
 
You're opening line: "With respect to all the people who were nice enough to respond to you trying to be helpful it never seizes to amaze me how little people in general know, or probably more accurately, care to know about the amazing guitar sounds guitarists from the early '80's..."

Sounds like you're the only one with all the answers and you somehow know so much more than anyone else and pretty much says it all. Makes you sound like a cork sniffing snob and your second response only confirms it. Oh, did I just disrespect you? Ya, guess I did... :sweatsmile:

Read the OP. The guy wants the tone, doesn't seem to care if it's a recreation of signal chain and technique. Sorry if your little feelings were hurt (not).
 
With respect to all the people who were nice enough to respond to you trying to be helpful it never seizes to amaze me how little people in general know, or probably more accurately, care to know about the amazing guitar sounds guitarists from the early '80's like Stewart Adamson from "Big Country" created and how they got their signature sounds. I always thought there was some kind of stigma put on many "new wave/alternative" guitarists from that area that they were just average guitar players with gimmics, guitar synths and overprocessing in the studio which makes me laugh as many of these guitarists would accurately reproduce their amazing studio sounds in live situations with relatively little gear and no guitar synths at all. When I say little gear, it was about the same quantity as the hair bands back then, just used differently and often more progressively.

I'm afraid most of the advice you got here isn't going to help you get that authentic Big Country sound. You should really know the equipment he was using then and his signal path to start with. For one thing, he never used a guitar synth to get that sound or on any of his awesome sounds so using the bagpipe preset someone put on Axechange while being a great preset for what it is, it's not going to get you that sound since no synth was used. And no, he didn't use any chorus or compression either. He used an old MXR Pitch Transposer (pitch shifter) with the pitch shifted an octive or something like that with some detuning for the distinct modulated effect he had. He combined this with some medium modulation delay via Korg SDD2000. He used sold state Fender Showman amps. These were the Fender amps Rivera designed when he was at Fender and are the best sounding solid state amps I've ever heard aside from some modelers, both in their distortion and clean sound. They have a very warm and unique sound both clean and distorted. I wish these amps were modeled in Axe Fx. His distortion came from his amps which have extensive EQing controls. He also used a duel nose gate. This is all he used to get all his great sounds until their third full album where he expanded his sound canvas a bit and added a few modulation fx.

Guitar players from the early '80s don't get nearly the respect and recognition they deserve for their very cool and unique guitar sounds they had.
Stuart Adamson of Big Country, Jamie West Oram of The Fixx, Paul Reynolds of Flock of Seagulls, Charlie Burchill of Simple Minds, etc all had awesome unique signature guitar sounds but I have yet to hear anyone reproduce their sounds accurately with the exception of one guy on youtube that reproduced the Big Country sound but he is a Big Country megafan who has duplicated all of Stewarts gear to the T. All the presets I've heard trying to duplicate these guitar players sounds don't even come close in my opinion. The funny thing is The Edge of U2 came from this stock of guitarists and I'm sure no one would duplicate his sound either had U2 vanished as a group in the lime light in the mid 80's like all these other bands did.
wasn't he also using some kind of coin instead of a pick on that sound? I think I read that years ago in an interview somewhere. and interestingly that whole article was along the same lines as what you said as one of the first things they said was that all his tones most of the time came just from very creative ideas...
 
You're opening line: "With respect to all the people who were nice enough to respond to you trying to be helpful it never seizes to amaze me how little people in general know, or probably more accurately, care to know about the amazing guitar sounds guitarists from the early '80's..."

Sounds like you're the only one with all the answers and you somehow know so much more than anyone else and pretty much says it all. Makes you sound like a cork sniffing snob and your second response only confirms it. Oh, did I just disrespect you? Ya, guess I did... :sweatsmile:

Read the OP. The guy wants the tone, doesn't seem to care if it's a recreation of signal chain and technique. Sorry if your little feelings were hurt (not).
That is only your childish interpretation sir, and I don't see any thumbs up for your last comment, guess no one agrees with you. That says it all.
 
wasn't he also using some kind of coin instead of a pick on that sound? I think I read that years ago in an interview somewhere. and interestingly that whole article was along the same lines as what you said as one of the first things they said was that all his tones most of the time came just from very creative ideas...
Ya, when Stewart first formed Big Country they didn't have quite that sound, and if you listen to some of their very first songs which are hard to find because they aren't on any albums, they don't have that very bagpipe sound. My understanding is Stewart had kind of an ah-ha moment after people commenting how his guitar playing style and tone sounded bagpipeish and then he isolated himself for like a month to perfect that sound, though they admitted later that they didn't have enough money to get some of the equipment they wanted for optimum results.

As for the picks used, no, both Adamson and Watson used used non-metalic picks, you might be thinking of Paul Reynolds of A Flock of Seagulls. He used a coin just like Brian May did.
 
That is only your childish interpretation sir, and I don't see any thumbs up for your last comment, guess no one agrees with you. That says it all.
Seriously? You come on here to respond to a quote from 1 1/2 years ago and start talking about "thumbs up"? Are you in third grade?

And yes, you are condescending.
 
The trick is to emulate an MXR pitch transposer (that's what the band used to get the faux bagpipe sound), you can easily do it on the the FM3 with the pitch block.
 


Sorry about the potato video quality, i made this pretty quickly with my tablet just to show the bagpipe effect.

I actually was going to cover this song sometime ago, i made all the scenes for the two guitars in the song. Unfortunately i never got to that stage (it happens a lot, i start working on other songs and forget some along the way).

I recently "cleaned up" my Fm3, it was full of custom presets and i was runing out of space for new ones. I guess i never made a backup of that preset (i tought i did, but i can't find it in my computer). Fortunately i did save the pitch block effect.

Anyway it's pretty simple stuff.

Compression - Pitch block (dual chromatic) drive (rat) - amp/cab - delay - reverb
 
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Sorry about the potato video quality, i made this pretty quickly with my tablet just to show the bagpipe effect.

I actually was going to cover this song sometime ago, i made all the scenes for the two guitars in the song. Unfortunately i never got to that stage (it happens a lot, i start working on other songs and forget some along the way).

I recently "cleaned up" my Fm3, it was full of custom presets and i was runing out of space for new ones. I guess i never made a backup of that preset (i tought i did, but i can't find it in my computer). Fortunately i did save the pitch block effect.

Anyway it's pretty simple stuff.

Compression - Pitch block (dual chromatic) drive (rat) - amp/cab - delay - reverb

Dude, that sounds awesome!
 
Tks!

Forgot to upload the preset!

It's pretty basic, but it gets close to the original sound (it's all about that pitch block).
 

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