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"Behind" note buzz.HELP!!!

Alenv3

Member
Btw. My axe is doing this from fw15 since i bought it...Thanks to all of you guys for help I'm going to leave this thread becouse I dont want to bother anyone anymore.We all have different opinions so this is endles thread.
 
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Lionheart

Guest
Some people prefer to have the natural amp sounds removed out of their amp. I'm not one of those guys. I don't want a sterilized version of an amp. Those oddities and quirks of a real amp give it it's character. Call me crazy.
 

Shredology

Inspired
Some people prefer to have the natural amp sounds removed out of their amp. I'm not one of those guys. I don't want a sterilized version of an amp. Those oddities and quirks of a real amp give it it's character. Call me crazy.
I don't think that is absolutely fair. This "fizz" distortion in an ugly, totally unmusical artifact. I think most would be happy to get rid of it, if that could be done in a specifically targeted way. That being said, I will echo another poster who mentioned it is more a bedroom annoyance and not really noticeable live.
 

Hellbat

Fractal Fanatic
I love the fizz. So real!

Check out this video from the :37 - 1:30 section. Lots of fizz in there. It's a real amp making that noise and the Axe FX 2 captures that dynamic perfectly.

 
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Rex

Legend!
Believe it or not, the fizz helps your tone cut through in the mix.

File it under "you can't please everyone." If the fizz isn't there, people say it "sounds sterile"..."sounds digital"..."where's the raw grit of a real amp?" Put the fizz back in, and some folks want that sterile sound back.

There are ways to reduce the fizz, as noted several posts above. But it's physically impossible to completely eliminate it from a distorted tone.
 

Gtr65

New Member
The "buzziness" of IM is a function of the "hardness" of the clipping circuit. The first thing you need to do is determine what is distorting: preamp or power amp. Power amp distortion is typically harder than preamp distortion due to global negative feedback. If you are using a modern amp model, i.e. something with a Master Volume, then there is a very good chance you might be overdriving the virtual power amp. In this case simply lowering the Master Volume will reduce IM.

If it's preamp distortion then you can reduce Preamp Hardness or experiment with the Preamp Bias to change the distortion character.

The Axe-Fx II is extremely accurate. Understanding how real amps work will allow you to adjust things to achieve your ultimate tone.
This is precisely what I wanted to know. Once again, thanks very, very much, Cliff!
 

BrickGlass

Inspired
This issue/concern does indeed get brought up every few months by someone, and then we have a few pages of discussion on the topic. If you don't have a problem with this buzz/fizz that is totally fine, but surely it is understandable that others are hearing it and wondering what it is, and if there is a way to reduce or remove it. I am always keeping an eye on this topic hoping for some insight from Cliff about options that may exist to address it, so I'm appreciative that he has chimed in here and I look forward to trying his suggestions.

The Axe-Fx is the best musical purchase I've made in my 25 years of playing guitar. This buzz/fizz does nothing to change my opinion about the Axe. It is an incredible piece of gear.
 

FractalAudio

Administrator
Fractal Audio Systems
Moderator
To put this to rest (again, for the umpteenth time):


One clip is the amp, the other is the model. All controls set the same.

The reason that it's more "noticeable" with modelers is that there is a lot more high frequency content in a typical IR. When you listen to your tube amp through its speaker you are in the far field and usually somewhat off-axis. There is less high frequency content reaching your ears compared to what a microphone records. Go put your amp in an isolation room and listen to it through the control room monitors. You'll be astonished at what you hear.
 
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Tommy Tempest

Experienced
Let me ask this question? Is this an issue with older firmware? Because I don't experience any of this unnatural fizz. The biggest thing I noticed with using the AXE for the last couple of months is, EQ is very important to tone. Too much bottom and it gets mushy, too much highs and it gets real fizzy fast. So if it is related to older firmware, update to the newest, because I don't hear what the op is referring to. If not, work on gain and EQ, especially if you have HF drivers in your choice of cab.
 

BrickGlass

Inspired
Let me ask this question? Is this an issue with older firmware? Because I don't experience any of this unnatural fizz. The biggest thing I noticed with using the AXE for the last couple of months is, EQ is very important to tone. Too much bottom and it gets mushy, too much highs and it gets real fizzy fast. So if it is related to older firmware, update to the newest, because I don't hear what the op is referring to. If not, work on gain and EQ, especially if you have HF drivers in your choice of cab.
Not a firmware issue. I've updated to every firmware as soon as it comes out for the last couple years. If you don't hear it, that is awesome.
 

chucma

Power User
Go put your amp in an isolation room and listen to it through the control room monitors. You'll be astonished at what you hear.
So true this. Long time ago, I took my favourite Marshall amp into the studio and mic'd it up, and sheesh I hated it after that!

That was my first lesson into how to mic up your amp properly. Basically now I've learned that's what amps do actually sound like, and it really pays off when you are in a mix because those sounds actually help develop your character so much. Everyone who has a tube amp has to learn how to make those sounds work for them, they become a natural part of your tone.
 
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