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Axe-Fx III Firmware Release Version 15.01

IronSean

Experienced
I mostly edit on the front panel even at home, don't like being tied to the computer. Some things are easier or quicker with Axe-Edit, but the on-unit capabilities are quite good.
I'm personally a big fan of the on-device experience. I can't be bothered to reach around and plug in a USB cable most of the time to use Axe-Edit. It takes a little time to learn where everything is, and the button layout isn't very conducive to using by feel, but I can be just as quick doing most things on device.
 

jon

Fractal Fanatic
I'm personally a big fan of the on-device experience. I can't be bothered to reach around and plug in a USB cable most of the time to use Axe-Edit. It takes a little time to learn where everything is, and the button layout isn't very conducive to using by feel, but I can be just as quick doing most things on device.
Yup, same here, most of my editing is done on the front panel, SOOOOOOOOO quick and easy

It takes all of like 10 minutes to get a hang of it at first, then it becomes so intuitive. I recognize the advantage of using a laptop, but for me, it's easier and more satisfying to reach out, grab a knob and make it happen.

Plus, I've noticed when I edit with the laptop, I tend to also edit with my eyes, and with the front panel I tend to use only ears, the way it should be, and I'm sure I'm not the only one here who subconsciously does that
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
Yup, same here, most of my editing is done on the front panel, SOOOOOOOOO quick and easy

It takes all of like 10 minutes to get a hang of it at first, then it becomes so intuitive. I recognize the advantage of using a laptop, but for me, it's easier and more satisfying to reach out, grab a knob and make it happen.

Plus, I've noticed when I edit with the laptop, I tend to also edit with my eyes, and with the front panel I tend to use only ears, the way it should be, and I'm sure I'm not the only one here who subconsciously does that
If my office/music room was set up in such a way that the front panel was at a convenient/comfortable height, I would use the front panel more.

I find AxeEdit to be indispensible for its integration of the Axe and file storage/backup on the computer.
 

Dave Merrill

Fractal Fanatic
If my office/music room was set up in such a way that the front panel was at a convenient/comfortable height, I would use the front panel more.
Yeah. My ergonomics aren't great for either one, but I get by if I'm sitting down. Which I never used to do, but anyway...

Part of the problem with the computer is the pick in my mousing hand. Front panel, it's not quite as bad.

I find AxeEdit to be indispensible for its integration of the Axe and file storage/backup on the computer.
Absolutely true, which is why I don't use templates and global blocks and such that much.

First world problems for sure, but real.
 

Joe Bfstplk

Axe-Master
Yeah. My ergonomics aren't great for either one, but I get by if I'm sitting down. Which I never used to do, but anyway...

Part of the problem with the computer is the pick in my mousing hand. Front panel, it's not quite as bad.

If my rack was on my old amp/rack/whatever stand that is in storage since the '90s, and angled upwards, it would be easier to do more than a couple adjustments via the front panel, but at the height it sits, it makes my neck cramp up. There's simply not enough room here to put it on the stand. It sits atop my Spacestation XL. For the computer, I just set the pick down and mouse as needed, then pick it back up.
 

jon

Fractal Fanatic
If my rack was on my old amp/rack/whatever stand that is in storage since the '90s, and angled upwards, it would be easier to do more than a couple adjustments via the front panel, but at the height it sits, it makes my neck cramp up. There's simply not enough room here to put it on the stand. It sits atop my Spacestation XL. For the computer, I just set the pick down and mouse as needed, then pick it back up.
Fracpad i must admit is a complete lifesaver in that regard!
 

stereotactic

Experienced
To all the people suggesting Axe Edit for live preset adjustment... yeah I love pulling out my laptop while on stage at a gig, and the audience too! :grin:
I can’t imagine anyone in the audience noticing much less caring about a smallest size MacBook Air sitting on top of my rack. I use it live for two reasons: 1) I like to be able to angle the screen up so I can see it while playing. I cannot see the Axe display because it’s typically at my waist and elevating or tilting it would require bringing additional gear. 2) I like to be able to see the whole signal path if I need to make a change. The Axe display is simply too small to see the whole signal path in any detail, those abbreviations on the blocks are tiny..
 

craiguitar

Power User
I can’t imagine anyone in the audience noticing much less caring about a smallest size MacBook Air sitting on top of my rack. I use it live for two reasons: 1) I like to be able to angle the screen up so I can see it while playing. I cannot see the Axe display because it’s typically at my waist and elevating or tilting it would require bringing additional gear. 2) I like to be able to see the whole signal path if I need to make a change. The Axe display is simply too small to see the whole signal path in any detail, those abbreviations on the blocks are tiny..
I agree, it’s hardly worth a thought. Ask anyone under the age of 30 what a gig looks like, and they’ll probably describe a solitary guy or girl on stage with a laptop, and pretty much nothing else.
As for actual real bands from the neolithic era who feel the need to play real instruments, well it’s not uncommon to see a keyboard player with a laptop perched somewhere on his rig. Perfectly acceptable I’d say.
 

negativefx

Inspired
I agree, it’s hardly worth a thought. Ask anyone under the age of 30 what a gig looks like, and they’ll probably describe a solitary guy or girl on stage with a laptop, and pretty much nothing else.
As for actual real bands from the neolithic era who feel the need to play real instruments, well it’s not uncommon to see a keyboard player with a laptop perched somewhere on his rig. Perfectly acceptable I’d say.
I set up a full RGB gaming rig next to my axefx on stage. gotta flex whenever i can
 

jon

Fractal Fanatic
I dunno.....having been myself part of a couple orchestras so far and quite a few studio sessions, both pre and post axe fx, I can tell you I can setup physically, even create a basic patch and tweak with precision in a couple minutes TOTAL and be playing whereas I'd still be struggling to get my amp and cab up the stairs.

With a preset already loaded (which 99% of us would have), I just have to plug and play, with a basic tweak here and there. I can literally be ready before the string section is tuned. I maybe haven't done as high profile gigs as him, but I can tell you being in similar situations, the axe fx is a GODSEND!

Kudos to whoever wants to struggle with loud heavy tube amps in an orchestral setting, but I can tell you from my personal experience it's not a favorite of the conductor nor orchestra NOR audience when all they are hearing is your Marshall
I JUST did a quick gig with some string players...set up my axe fx, PA, tuning and ready to rock, and they were still tuning. I had enough time to build a patch (albeit from a template) in fracpad for them to play through with me by the time they were ready.

Now I pride myself in record setup/teardown times, but I'm pretty sure anyone who spends a few minutes to know their gear can get things done quickly. I literally just proved it a couple hours ago 😂
 

Ghast

Member
I agree, it’s hardly worth a thought. Ask anyone under the age of 30 what a gig looks like, and they’ll probably describe a solitary guy or girl on stage with a laptop, and pretty much nothing else.
As for actual real bands from the neolithic era who feel the need to play real instruments, well it’s not uncommon to see a keyboard player with a laptop perched somewhere on his rig. Perfectly acceptable I’d say.
I see this train of thought a fair amount on forums, but you're neglecting plenty of thriving music scenes that are comprised largely of young musicians. All age metal shows are SWARMING with 16yo kids who are dying to see live bands. As soon as they turn 18 they're at every show they can get to. I've seen similarly eager kids at indie rock shows, and quite a few driven kids at jam gigs, playing jazzier stuff too. In fact, people under 30 make up at least 75% of any show I've been to in my life (not including classic rock cover bands). Its always older folks begrudging ticket prices and swearing off live music, in my experience.
 

craiguitar

Power User
I see this train of thought a fair amount on forums, but you're neglecting plenty of thriving music scenes that are comprised largely of young musicians. All age metal shows are SWARMING with 16yo kids who are dying to see live bands. As soon as they turn 18 they're at every show they can get to. I've seen similarly eager kids at indie rock shows, and quite a few driven kids at jam gigs, playing jazzier stuff too. In fact, people under 30 make up at least 75% of any show I've been to in my life (not including classic rock cover bands). Its always older folks begrudging ticket prices and swearing off live music, in my experience.
Fair enough, I’m generalising, but I work in a office of 33 people, mostly made up of under 30s, and whenever they chat about music, or gigs they go to, it’s not bands, but EDM, DJ’s, Pop dance acts, and rappers.
 
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